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Handy tool

Didn't think I'd need it, but when I saw it at my local builders supply, I just had to have one. Used it yesterday to level a Viessmann horizontal indirect and it paid for itself.

Pumped it up and it lifted the tank up high enough for me to get a wrench on the nuts to adjust the feet.


Often wrong, never in doubt.
Paul S_3Rich_49STEVEusaPAGreenGeneChrisJSWEI

Comments

  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,837
    I saw that thing at my local hardware store the other day and had the same thought, Might not need it very often, but would be nice to have when needed... Fire departments use something like this connected to the exhaust pipe of their fire trucks for emergency heavy lifting.

    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • GreenGene
    GreenGene Member Posts: 290
    Why didn't I think of that?
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 11,831
    Made in Denmark, NICE!
    :)
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Coany
    Coany Member Posts: 91
    Is it bad form to ask how much?
    " Do what you can, with what you have, where you are" Teddy Roosevelt
  • FranklinD
    FranklinD Member Posts: 399
    The Fire Dept I work for has a few varieties of them, from 4 to 64 sq ft for lifting semi trailers off of cars and such things. We have a large truck-mounted air tank (30 gal or so) filled by either the truck's air brake compressor, a standalone gas-powered compressor, or recharged by shop air thru an umbilical while parked. The smaller ones are like a heavy nylon almost, but the big ones are multiple layers, the outermost being a type of fireproofed canvas.

    I have a small one much like the one pictured... I've used it to help level washers, dryers, stoves, workbenches, you name it. In my world at the moment (mechanic/building maintenance) it has a million possible uses.

    Besides...who needs an excuse to buy another tool? Snap-On and Matco having charge accounts available on their tool trucks is about the worst thing that ever happened to 20-year-old me....but I still go on the truck every week to see what the 'specials' are. Ha.
    Ford Master Technician, "Tinkerer of Terror"
    Police & Fire Equipment Lead Mechanic, NW WI
    Lover of Old Homes & Gravity Hot Water Systems
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,209
    Back in the day we did the same thing at the local Sears tool department. Six months after getting out of the army I remember applying for a major credit card, I got refused because of insufficient work history. I had worked for 11 months before going in the army, 3 years at different posts in the army, and six months at a job after the army. I was pretty pissed.

    I was in the sears tool department one Saturday morning soon after looking at a 9" table saw, one of the salesmen I knew came over and told me it was a sweet deal. i agreed but told him I didn't have the cash, he told me he could get me a sears store card and didn't think I'd have any problem. I went down to the credit office filled out the form and left with a card that had a whopping $500 limit.

    Over the next couple of decades I bought a lot of stuff from Sears so they were well rewarded for giving me that card.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    Coany said:

    Is it bad form to ask how much?

    They are about $20.00 here: http://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/winbag-12323r
  • Solid_Fuel_Man
    Solid_Fuel_Man Member Posts: 2,269
    That was my go-to tool when I worked at a garage. We used it almost exclusively to get into locked cars. Slide it between the door and the roof of a vehicle and pump it up. Then you can slide a metal rod in and pop open the door handle, or better yet push the power unlock button! It was even the same brand, made in Denmark.

    TS
    Serving Northern Maine HVAC & Controls. I burn wood, it smells good!