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Recommendations for generator to support heating system?

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Comments

  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 4,919
    Mark N said:

    Since there is a potential for danger to the linemen, isn't it best to determine the line is dead before working on it. I myself the think any wire should be considered to be live until it is determined it is not.

    That is the standard procedure. It's called "live, dead, live" testing. They use a tester on a long fiberglass pole to see if the line is live. They put it on a known live wire to make sure the tester is working correctly, then onto the dead wire then the live wire again for verification of function. The problem is after they do that there is nothing to stop a homeowner from turning a generator on. Most of the time they will add a ground to the line once it's dead for protection of all personnel, but that is usually on the feed side of the line. What if there is a break in the line they are fixing and the backfeed is on the other side? There are so many things that can go wrong with generators. The lineman do everything they possibly can to protect themselves and they still get killed on occasion. I can remember cruising a whole neighborhood one night listening for generators. Had to knock on every door to find the one back feeding. Found one in a basement running with no ventilation, another in the house with door open. Everyone was like "what's the problem?". It was a real eye opening night.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    Gordy
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    KC_Jones said:

    Mark N said:

    Since there is a potential for danger to the linemen, isn't it best to determine the line is dead before working on it. I myself the think any wire should be considered to be live until it is determined it is not.

    That is the standard procedure. It's called "live, dead, live" testing. They use a tester on a long fiberglass pole to see if the line is live. They put it on a known live wire to make sure the tester is working correctly, then onto the dead wire then the live wire again for verification of function. The problem is after they do that there is nothing to stop a homeowner from turning a generator on. Most of the time they will add a ground to the line once it's dead for protection of all personnel, but that is usually on the feed side of the line. What if there is a break in the line they are fixing and the backfeed is on the other side? There are so many things that can go wrong with generators. The lineman do everything they possibly can to protect themselves and they still get killed on occasion. I can remember cruising a whole neighborhood one night listening for generators. Had to knock on every door to find the one back feeding. Found one in a basement running with no ventilation, another in the house with door open. Everyone was like "what's the problem?". It was a real eye opening night.



    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,359
    ChrisJ said:

    hot rod said:

    ChrisJ said:

    hot rod said:

    Gordy said:

    Usually when back up generators are installed a permit is pulled, and proper automatic transfer, and disconnect are installed to code, and local utility requirements.

    Where this thread has gone is an under the radar approach. Not recommended. One slip up could cost you big money in fines, and or physical harm loss of life.

    When these type of threads appear I cringe. You never know the capabilities of a lurker.


    Pretty much any thread involving a DIYer or HO here has this potential.

    In this business we deal with fire, pressure, electricity, steam, fuels, flue gas, etc. All have the potential to cause harm and should be under the care of a qualified, insured professional.
    Like the one that almost killed me and my family in 2011.
    No thanks.

    Anytime I hear that it makes me cringe. In fact, this time I even dry heaved a little.

    Apparently you misunderstood the word qualified? If a homeowner is qualified to own, operate, and understand the workings of a combustion analyzer, for example, go for it. same with a generator I suppose.

    Any trades person you hire to protect you and your family, should be qualified and I feel insured should an accident or mistake occur.

    I do a lot, most, of my own work and take responsibility for it and am aware of the consequences.
    No, I noticed you included "insured professional.".
    The licensed professional I hired claimed he was qualified. How was I to know any different?

    "qual·i·fied
    ˈkwäləˌfīd/Submit
    adjective
    1.
    officially recognized as being trained to perform a particular job; certified."

    Did he willing and knowingly do something that could put you and your family in harm?
    Or was it a mistake or oversight?
    We all make mistakes in our lifetime, there is a big difference between willfully causing harm or potential for harm.

    Glad you and the family are safe regardless.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    hot rod said:

    ChrisJ said:

    hot rod said:

    ChrisJ said:

    hot rod said:

    Gordy said:

    Usually when back up generators are installed a permit is pulled, and proper automatic transfer, and disconnect are installed to code, and local utility requirements.

    Where this thread has gone is an under the radar approach. Not recommended. One slip up could cost you big money in fines, and or physical harm loss of life.

    When these type of threads appear I cringe. You never know the capabilities of a lurker.


    Pretty much any thread involving a DIYer or HO here has this potential.

    In this business we deal with fire, pressure, electricity, steam, fuels, flue gas, etc. All have the potential to cause harm and should be under the care of a qualified, insured professional.
    Like the one that almost killed me and my family in 2011.
    No thanks.

    Anytime I hear that it makes me cringe. In fact, this time I even dry heaved a little.

    Apparently you misunderstood the word qualified? If a homeowner is qualified to own, operate, and understand the workings of a combustion analyzer, for example, go for it. same with a generator I suppose.

    Any trades person you hire to protect you and your family, should be qualified and I feel insured should an accident or mistake occur.

    I do a lot, most, of my own work and take responsibility for it and am aware of the consequences.
    No, I noticed you included "insured professional.".
    The licensed professional I hired claimed he was qualified. How was I to know any different?

    "qual·i·fied
    ˈkwäləˌfīd/Submit
    adjective
    1.
    officially recognized as being trained to perform a particular job; certified."

    Did he willing and knowingly do something that could put you and your family in harm?
    Or was it a mistake or oversight?
    We all make mistakes in our lifetime, there is a big difference between willfully causing harm or potential for harm.

    Glad you and the family are safe regardless.
    Will respond in PM, don't want to throw the thread off anymore than it has been.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,678
    The linemen around here are aware of that possibility -- and in general any line being worked on is grounded. Among other things, if someone connects a generator it will trip its fuse if it's connected to the grounded power line. They are pretty savvy people.

    I do agree with a couple of the previous points. First, one of the benefits of thread like this is that it helps people who might not otherwise have thought of a particular hazard to be aware of it. I have found that to be true in a number if instances. The other is it may encourage people to use professionals in situations with which they are not comfortable.

    I have no problem with a qualified homeowner doing his or her own work. I do a lot!
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • rickgerv
    rickgerv Member Posts: 22
    Concur with KC_Jones. I thought my electrician was ripping me off overcharging for something I don't need. These threads help. I'm still unclear whether any backup auto-generator (installed by my electrician) will keep my heating system up... pumps, mod con boiler, etc. I assume it will and simply kicks in when the power is off.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    rickgerv said:

    Concur with KC_Jones. I thought my electrician was ripping me off overcharging for something I don't need. These threads help. I'm still unclear whether any backup auto-generator (installed by my electrician) will keep my heating system up... pumps, mod con boiler, etc. I assume it will and simply kicks in when the power is off.

    I don't know what you were quoted, and we're not allowed to discuss it here.
    But what I can say is no, they're very expensive. Just the hardware alone is pricey but they're reliable and extremely quiet.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • KC_Jones
    KC_Jones Member Posts: 4,919
    There are also manual transfer switches that allow for manual manipulation. So basically the power goes out, you crank up the generator and to get the power to feed you flip a switch that disconnects you from the street and connects the generator at the same time. My former boss at the POCO had this setup with a 10kw generator. She had horrible electric service so she needed it. To go fully automatic is when the real money can start flowing.
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,252
    The key is you have to understand how to make sure the generator power can never get out of the house. If it never leaves the house then there is no harm no foul HOWEVER it has to be done so someone that does not know what they are doing CAN NOT feed generator power back to the service input lugs.

    It can be designed so it''s safe but make sure you understand what you are doing, lives are at stake.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,514
    KC_Jones said:

    I will go one step further and say I think the good pros should embrace these types of posts. Think about it this way, this is how you get the word out about the proper way to install equipment instead of the hack way. People say cringe I say smile. Look at the OP's reaction, they now realize why it costs so much to do this correctly. If we don't forward the best practices how do homeowner know what is right from wrong? How do we stop from being taken for a ride versus paying for what is right? It is talked about all the time how nearly impossible it is for a homeowner to vet out a contractor and these types of posts educate us on what is correct. Sorry to hijack, it just gets frustrating when all any of us is trying to do is keep our head above water and sometimes it feels like people are trying to drown us.

    That's why Jamie, and myself felt compelled to be explicit of the dangers. I personally was not jabbing homeowners, most of us are all homeowners? Darwin wanders everywhere. Even in the trades.


    Also to be a little more explicit on the lineman protection. There should be a visible ground at both sides of their work area. If there is a radial it should be grounded also. That's per OSHA standards.

    A friend of mines grandpa started an electrical business. My friends father took it over, but gramps would still help out along with my freind who is actually a heavy equipment operator.

    They were doing some work at a church. My buddy was up on a ladder going to install a ceiling fan. He forgot to open the breaker on the circuit so he yelled down to gramps asked if he would turn the power off.

    Gramps: Yup powers off.

    Buddy: Takes wire nuts off, and gets jolted. Hey you old #%*+ I thought you said the power was off.

    Gramps: Never take another mans word......... And Walked out of the room.


  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,252
    Trust BUT verify.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
    GordyCanucker
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,252
    People that don't verify end up dead. I worked on HV radar power supplies for years and I always verified the power was off by measuring it, and that the shorting bar was applied to the output.

    When you hear the wire in a three phase conduit banging around your VERY happy you verified the shorting bar was on the output of the power supply. The wire banging around is the result of the shorting bar reflecting hundreds of amps back into the primary, the thermal circuit breaker back at the panel takes some time to heat and trip.

    Then you go find the idiot that removed your lockout and switched the power back on.

    In 1969 a guy was working on a tropo ground station transmitter in Pusan Korea. He didn't lock out the source and was killed when somebody turned on the disconnect. The second mistake that soldier made was not applying the shorting bar to the power supply.

    Bob

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • Jean-David Beyer
    Jean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,666
    I got a natural gas powered backup generator, and had it installed by a contractor who did nothing else. He employed licensed electrician ,on his staff and subcontracted to a licensed plumber to connect up the natural gas feed. Permits were pulled and inspections were done.

    The generator is a 12,000 watt Kohler that has a 75 amp circuit breaker in it. My house could, in principle, draw 200 amps, but it never would. I kept my Square D power distribution panel, but they added two breakers to it for the backup system. One powers the electronics in the generator (that also has a 12-volt storage battery in it) and is a GFI model. The other powers a load-shedding relay that will drop off my electric stove and my electric clothes drier if I am running on the generator. I can defeat that if I am careful. Mainly, I would never run the drier if the stove was on, and I would run only the top "burners" of the stove, never the oven. And never both the stove and the drier at the same time.

    They also added two big electrical boxes. One is a giant Double-Pole Normally closed relay that goes to my drier and stove. The other is another with a giant Double Pole Double Throw relay in it that selects if the house gets its power from the generator or the power company. It cannot connect the two together.

    They also put a plastic notice on the meter pan warning that there is a backup generator attached to the system. One of those things that is a 3 layer sandwich red on top, and white inside. And it is engraved so there are white letters on a red background. There is a similar sign on the power change over box that even tells where the backup generator is, so it could be shut off if necessary.

    The electric inspector pulled the covers off the three boxes to see that everything was OK. The gas inspector came three times. First, before the trench with the pipe in it was backfilled, second to physically examine the pipes, and third to monitor the pressure test. Only then would he remove his seal on the shutoff valve and we could try it out. Interestingly, power failed a couple of days later for an hour or so, and it all worked fine.

    At about the same time (a little before) I had a whole-house surge protector wired into my power distribution panel.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    edited January 2016
    This is what we put in equipment was a surge protector. I'd be surprised if any external surge protector or power strip was much more but would love to see what's in the fancy expensive ones with a display.

    http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ERZ-V20D201/P7229-ND/137412


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • BobC
    BobC Member Posts: 5,252
    You can get ones that look like a small hockey pucks and I suspect that is what they use in these but I've never cracked one open -

    http://www.mrsupply.com/cutler-hammer-chspultra-surge-suppressor-brand-new.html?gclid=COHR84imt8oCFZYWHwodcVQAnA

    This one is installed on my new panel.

    Bob
    Smith G8-3 with EZ Gas @ 90,000 BTU, Single pipe steam
    Vaporstat with a 12oz cut-out and 4oz cut-in
    3PSI gauge
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,514

    I got a natural gas powered backup generator, and had it installed by a contractor who did nothing else. He employed licensed electrician ,on his staff and subcontracted to a licensed plumber to connect up the natural gas feed. Permits were pulled and inspections were done.

    The generator is a 12,000 watt Kohler that has a 75 amp circuit breaker in it. My house could, in principle, draw 200 amps, but it never would. I kept my Square D power distribution panel, but they added two breakers to it for the backup system. One powers the electronics in the generator (that also has a 12-volt storage battery in it) and is a GFI model. The other powers a load-shedding relay that will drop off my electric stove and my electric clothes drier if I am running on the generator. I can defeat that if I am careful. Mainly, I would never run the drier if the stove was on, and I would run only the top "burners" of the stove, never the oven. And never both the stove and the drier at the same time.

    They also added two big electrical boxes. One is a giant Double-Pole Normally closed relay that goes to my drier and stove. The other is another with a giant Double Pole Double Throw relay in it that selects if the house gets its power from the generator or the power company. It cannot connect the two together.

    They also put a plastic notice on the meter pan warning that there is a backup generator attached to the system. One of those things that is a 3 layer sandwich red on top, and white inside. And it is engraved so there are white letters on a red background. There is a similar sign on the power change over box that even tells where the backup generator is, so it could be shut off if necessary.

    The electric inspector pulled the covers off the three boxes to see that everything was OK. The gas inspector came three times. First, before the trench with the pipe in it was backfilled, second to physically examine the pipes, and third to monitor the pressure test. Only then would he remove his seal on the shutoff valve and we could try it out. Interestingly, power failed a couple of days later for an hour or so, and it all worked fine.

    At about the same time (a little before) I had a whole-house surge protector wired into my power distribution panel.


    Good to,hear from you Jean. Been wondering of your where abouts.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,223
    This discussion has been there before, but is always good safety discussion/review.
    Out here in the rural area almost every farm/ranch has a transfer switch included in with their meter socket. This is pole mounted in the farmyard, furnished by the REA (an old term that most don't recognize..this is really a quiz)...rural power companies.
    They will install that for some ridiculous low fee of maybe 25-50 dollars. They want it for protection of lineman and also they are all CO-OP operated, the managing board consists of the farmer/ranchers customers who mostly have tractor operated stand-by generators of typically 20KW. These transfer switches have a female cord connection hanging out of the bottom of them. Anything from 30Amp up to 200 Amp rating. They are never hot as in a "suicide cord connection" but are to connect to a generator source and feed the customer side of the DPDT switch when it is manually switched down. (Yes, you have to get out of the house to make it work. ;) , but it is so much better than a dark, cold and waterless house/farm.)

    Few people realize that transformers can work backwards almost as well as forwards. Your little Honda making 120V can, if connected to your incoming service line, produce up to 7200 volts on the primary line by backfeeding thru the transformer. This can be a hazard to everyone if your primary line is laying on the ground or within reach of anyone. Linemen will typically ground out lines before working on them. This is done with a "hot stick" and rubber gloves. This would short out your generator and they would see your lights go out, my guess is if you were producing feedback and failed to cooperate to cease and desist then your primary fuse would be probably be disconnected and reinstalled at a later date, maybe the last farm reconnected. But Sh't happens and there can be accidents for which the homeowner would be liable.

    I have connected many appliances with field installed cords, this includes dishwashers, garbage disposals for service disconnects and 120 VAC water pumps, furnaces etc for the very reason we are having this discussion, the AHJ understands the intent and approves the installation. (Common sense sometimes prevails).
  • bmwpowere36m3
    bmwpowere36m3 Member Posts: 512
    Just to play devil's advocate… Are transfer switches or DPDT switches anymore reliable means of insuring power cannot go out to the line vs. using the main breaker on the circuit panel.

    NOT accounting for user error, i.e., forgetting to switch off the main breaker, whereas the transfer switch would do it automatically.

    I realize there's dangers with anything… however as long as you switch the main breaker off before powering the panel, what's the problem?
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,514
    edited January 2016
    If the main disconnect in the panel is open then there is no danger. However that is the weakest link remembering to open the breaker before the generator is engaged .
    bmwpowere36m3
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,514
    edited January 2016
    While this all seems to be elementary. People lose train of thought in a seemingly crisis situation. Focus primarily being on generating power so comfort is not lost. Then remembering preliminary steps after,secondary steps have already been taken.
    bmwpowere36m3
  • bmwpowere36m3
    bmwpowere36m3 Member Posts: 512


    I realize there's dangers with anything… however as long as you switch the main breaker off before powering the panel, what's the problem?

    Which "you" are you talking about?

    The typical ones?

    Like the ones that drive motor vehicles on a daily basis?

    Those?
    I know what your getting at… but with that kind of attitude we shouldn't let anyone do anything, unless their licensed/blessed/etc…

    I guess the argument extends to homeowners doing work on their homes… I guess I'm lucky that I have half a brain, a great father I learned a LOT from, a good AHJ and have done all work myself (pulling permits when required). If I don't know something, I ask a professional or AHJ for a second opinion before proceeding.

    I guess I just have a little sore spot when topics like this come up and sometimes the general tone is that homeowners/individuals shouldn't be doing work… "leave it to the professional".

    However I agree, that the dangers and consequences should be made well-aware.

  • bmwpowere36m3
    bmwpowere36m3 Member Posts: 512
    Gordy said:

    While this all seems to be elementary. People lose train of thought in a seemingly crisis situation. Focus primarily being on generating power so comfort is not lost. Then remembering preliminary steps after,secondary steps have already been taken.

    I agree… that said, I've never lost power and been in a "crisis" moment. However I can't speak for others.

    It more like, "Well, crap… we lost power (usually always when there's feet of snow out). Better pull out the generator, run the cord into the basement, disconnect the mains, start gen, and be mindful of what's turned on in the house"

    Then it's a waiting game, once we see neighbors with lights or periodically check if power has been restored.

    Biggest "crisis" I remember is to remember to fuel the gen and get fuel. I think we once ran the house for almost a week following a freak storm up here in the Northeast a few years ago.
  • Paul48
    Paul48 Member Posts: 4,470
    Try as you might...It is impossible to make everything in life "idiot-proof". All you can do is caution someone as to the dangers to everyone involved, and be done with it. Those that would do as they please, maybe read the first caution posted here, and the next 100 fell on deaf ears. Did you know, that you can't put insecticide in a drinking water tank, to kill mosquito larva? Sadly, that happened in a school in China.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,223
    In over 40 years as an electrician I have seen numerous main breakers that would only disconnect one leg. The main is so seldom used that this would go unnoticed. At least 2 of them were Square D, and many times the old pushmatic will say off but leave one leg hot. I am sure there were more but as said the main is seldom exercised. If I do shut off a main CB I will check that both legs disengage.
    The typical auto transfer usually has a mechanical interlock to assure positive switching. The manual switch is usually a large knife blade switch.

    But all need to be exercised and tested that they have functioned correctly.

    On a large RTU the knife switch disconnect would open 2 out of 3 poles, the unit would shut down.......safe right, after learning the hard way, :o I have always opened the switch box to visually see all blades had opened. There are quite a few "sidearm" switched disconnects on basement equipment and AC's. People assume that they never wear out as they are seldom used. The fiberboard insulator that moves the blades decays with age and humidity, the sidearm may move but not the knife. So it is always worth a look inside. And also something overlooked in change outs.
    ChrisJ
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    edited January 2016
    JUGHNE said:

    In over 40 years as an electrician I have seen numerous main breakers that would only disconnect one leg. The main is so seldom used that this would go unnoticed. At least 2 of them were Square D, and many times the old pushmatic will say off but leave one leg hot. I am sure there were more but as said the main is seldom exercised. If I do shut off a main CB I will check that both legs disengage.
    The typical auto transfer usually has a mechanical interlock to assure positive switching. The manual switch is usually a large knife blade switch.

    But all need to be exercised and tested that they have functioned correctly.

    On a large RTU the knife switch disconnect would open 2 out of 3 poles, the unit would shut down.......safe right, after learning the hard way, :o I have always opened the switch box to visually see all blades had opened. There are quite a few "sidearm" switched disconnects on basement equipment and AC's. People assume that they never wear out as they are seldom used. The fiberboard insulator that moves the blades decays with age and humidity, the sidearm may move but not the knife. So it is always worth a look inside. And also something overlooked in change outs.


    My dream was to have a panel that is both fuses and circuit breakers.

    For example, a 20A fuse in series with a 18A breaker for a 20A circuit. I'd love to see this (or whatever size that is appropriate) for every circuit in the house. Of course I can't have this for obvious reasons. (No one makes it, it'd be against code etc)

    Mechanical breakers do stick sometimes, fuses don't. I do insist on a QO panel in my house, but that's about all I can do.

    All of my designs use fuses and always have. Typically 3AG.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,678
    @JUGHNE -- I like your comment! There is a very good reason that I carry one of the little neon voltage sensors and use it, every time I work on a wire! Not that they're fool proof -- but every little bit helps.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • HydroAirJoe
    HydroAirJoe Member Posts: 27
    I quickly read thru the posts I see nobody has bought up the fact of that lots of these cheap portable generators do not produce the the cleanest of power. Not a big deal for your lights, but I would be a bit cautious about powering any sensitive equipment like computers or fancy control boards on heating equipment. An inverter may be a better choice for those applications, but TBH I have used a B&S Wheelhouse portable generator many times without any issues.
    ChrisJ
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083
    edited January 2016

    I quickly read thru the posts I see nobody has bought up the fact of that lots of these cheap portable generators do not produce the the cleanest of power. Not a big deal for your lights, but I would be a bit cautious about powering any sensitive equipment like computers or fancy control boards on heating equipment. An inverter may be a better choice for those applications, but TBH I have used a B&S Wheelhouse portable generator many times without any issues.

    Actually, a few others brought it up early in the thread but it was early on and probably easy to miss.


    Here was my response to this earlier in the thread.


    "I have to admit, if something with a microprocessor can't run on literally any generator producing 105-130V AC over a fairly wide range of frequencies, noise and all, I have very little respect for the product. All of them run on DC and I would expect most fairly recent products (past 10 years?) to have switchers in them with decent filtering.

    Anything I've built doesn't care what noise is on the AC line.

    That said, I really have no idea what kind of garbage is being sold these days.


    I've heard Honda generators mentioned again and again for many years and have yet to hear a bad thing about them. I too would recommend one. I'm still using a 1992 Coleman 4KW generator that sounds like a dump truck going through a nitroglycerin plant. It gets the job done and hasn't let me down so it stays. it's output is ugly, and it's voltage is on the highside but nothing I own cares."
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • HydroAirJoe
    HydroAirJoe Member Posts: 27
    BTW, I like these better than transfer switches...
    generlink
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083

    BTW, I like these better than transfer switches...
    generlink

    I don't know if I care for my meter protruding a foot out of the meter pan.

    Is there a website out there with larger pictures? The 190x190 pictures are very difficult to get any detail out of. :(

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Paul48
    Paul48 Member Posts: 4,470
    edited January 2016
    My meter is on the driveway side of the house. It might make it through the first day. I figure, three bills in a row, that you conserve on electricity, and the utility company would leave that thing on your front porch.
  • rickgerv
    rickgerv Member Posts: 22
    Somewhat off topic but related. One of concerns that I didn't state is keeping the heating system on to prevent frozen pipes especially if there's standing water in the pipes when the power goes out. Hence a generator to keep it running. As an alternative, assuming I'm home, can all the water be drained if it appears will be off for a while and weather conditions are bad. I DID NOT want glycol running in my pipes.
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    rickgerv said:

    Somewhat off topic but related. One of concerns that I didn't state is keeping the heating system on to prevent frozen pipes especially if there's standing water in the pipes when the power goes out. Hence a generator to keep it running. As an alternative, assuming I'm home, can all the water be drained if it appears will be off for a while and weather conditions are bad. I DID NOT want glycol running in my pipes.

    That's a lot more work and only addresses the heating system. What about all the water lines to sinks, toilets, etc? I'd go with a generator if it were me and I knew the power would be out for a while.
    Jean-David Beyer
  • HydroAirJoe
    HydroAirJoe Member Posts: 27
    CrisJ
    Are the pictures you can find on their site in the download section, not good enough? http://www.generlink.com/downloads.cfm
    BTW, I think your power company has to ok the use of this device.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 12,083

    CrisJ
    Are the pictures you can find on their site in the download section, not good enough? http://www.generlink.com/downloads.cfm
    BTW, I think your power company has to ok the use of this device.

    Everything is tiny, it's like it was setup for a 320×200 display from the 1980s.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment