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Main Drain Root treatment

BioBio Member Posts: 275
edited November 2015 in Plumbing
Had my main line backing up, long story short, roots were found in the old cast iron line, they were removed, what's recommended to keep re-growth at check

Comments

  • vaporvacvaporvac Member Posts: 1,516
    I hope someone answers this because I have the same problem every so often.
    Two-pipe Trane vaporvacuum system; 1466 edr
    Twinned, staged Slantfin TR50s piped into 4" header with Riello G400 burners; 240K lead, 200K lag Btus. Controlled by Taco Relay and Honeywell RTH6580WF
  • SWEISWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Copper sulfate will help, but only so much. The best answer IMO is to replace the line with fusion welded HDPE.
  • Jamie HallJamie Hall Member Posts: 11,371
    Right on, SWEI. The only long term solution is to replace the jointed pipe -- whether AC, cast iron, clay, whatever, with fusion welded HDPEm-- or, in larger pipes, a liner. Trees are persistent critters, and if there is a joint -- even a very well made one -- they will find a way through. One can clean them out -- there are a variety of firms which are more than happy to come out with their little reamer gadgets -- but that is at best a temporary solution. So is chemical treatment.
    Br. Jamie, osb

    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England.

    Hoffman Equipped System (all original except boiler), Weil-Mclain 580, 2.75 gph Carlin, Vapourstat 0.5 -- 6.0 ounces per square inch
  • SWEISWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Many years ago, I did some work with a builder in Santa Barbara who lined his french drain trenches (encircled them, really) with copper window screen. Worked amazingly well in a climate where trees are growing probably 50 weeks per year.
  • vaporvacvaporvac Member Posts: 1,516
    I'm guessing none of these are DIY type projects. :( How big need the lines be to line vs. replace? Reaming them out lasts for a while, but once they clog the results are bad!
    Two-pipe Trane vaporvacuum system; 1466 edr
    Twinned, staged Slantfin TR50s piped into 4" header with Riello G400 burners; 240K lead, 200K lag Btus. Controlled by Taco Relay and Honeywell RTH6580WF
  • j a_2j a_2 Member Posts: 1,796
    Did they offer to provide you a video...of the pipe? If it's clay pipe, chances are its at a joint, where the roots alyays head for...Depending on different variables like your location and is this public or private sewer, septic or not...dictates the next step
  • SWEISWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Trenchless replacement (usually with Fusion welded HDPE) requires about $50k worth of equipment and proper training. It's typically priced per running foot, with either a setup charge or a minimum footage. It's generally worth the cost IME, and is going to be the longest-lived solution.

    Lining (often with epoxy) is sometimes less expensive, and sometimes more so. Its biggest advantage is that it can be done from one end, meaning it can often make it all the way to the city main without breaking up the road. If the problem lies under a busy street, it may be the only practical option.
  • Danny ScullyDanny Scully Member Posts: 1,219
    edited November 2015
    www.rootx.com
  • KC_JonesKC_Jones Member Posts: 4,235
    I've had great success with chainsaws, fixes the problem permanently. Lol
    2014 Weil Mclain EG-40
    EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Boiler Control
    Boiler pictures updated 2/21/15
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10202744301871904.1073741828.1330391881&type=1&l=c34ad6ee78
  • vaporvacvaporvac Member Posts: 1,516
    You are so bad, @KC_Jones! Hijacking this post now... I've never really looked into it seriously, but when a problem crops up, it's enough to get me thinking about it.
    Two-pipe Trane vaporvacuum system; 1466 edr
    Twinned, staged Slantfin TR50s piped into 4" header with Riello G400 burners; 240K lead, 200K lag Btus. Controlled by Taco Relay and Honeywell RTH6580WF
  • delta Tdelta T Member Posts: 788
    Whether or not it is worth the expense of replaceing it depends on a lot of things. Maintenance (snaking once every year or even six months can go a long way before it adds up to the cost of a new line in many cases.

    We do not do lining or epoxy for the simple reason that sewer replacements are not a big enough part of our business to warrant the investment for the equipment, and lining is not always the best solution in my opinon. I have seen liners put in that clog in 2 years not due to roots, but due to the fact that the old line had huge settlement problems and was pitched the wrong way for portions of its length, and the liner simply follows the old line's path and so the problem remains.

    That being said Lining or epoxy is often a viable solution especially as SWEI mentioned if the problem is in the road. Digging in the road often triples or even quadruples the cost per foot for digging a trench. Don't know about other places but my local municipality makes the HO responsible for the asphalt patch for 6 years I think.

    First thing to do is get the line videoed to see what kind of shape it is in. If there is no settlement, or separation at the joints, or cracking, a cleaning once per year will avoid most backups and can be done for many years before you even come close to the cost of replacement IMHO.

    Only good long term solution is replacement however.

    copper sulfate does work sometimes...but keep in mind that it can and often does kill trees, not just roots.
  • jjheatjjheat Member Posts: 35
    Call a good drain company with a camera and high pressure water jetter. Cleans out roots 10 times better then snaking. Make sure they are experienced and use a camera as they are jetting to see condition of pipe.
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