Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

kickspace heater

Options
jtz1229
jtz1229 Member Posts: 3
My friend's daughter is building a small modular house. He is trying to do a lot of small things to help save her a little money. All the baseboard is in and there are 3/4" pex drops into the basement. There are going to be two zones. He can save a little money by running the pex around the basement tying in all the baseboards and terminating the pex where the boiler is going to be. I am going to help him this weekend. There is a kickspace heater in the kitchen with 1/2" drops into the basement. It is activated by a switch in the kitchen. I'm sure there is an aquastat in the heater so that the fan only runs when there is hot enough water going through it. I'm just not sure of the correct way to tie it into the 3/4" pex. Thanks for your help.

Comments

  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 4,448
    Options
    simple way is to do 2 -- 3/4 x 1/2 x1/2 tees. in series separated by at least 12". 1/2" to the kick and back and 1/2" in line.... some goes to the kick some continues along.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 17,008
    Options
    Yup- that's how I'd do it.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • Bob Bona_4
    Bob Bona_4 Member Posts: 2,083
    Options
    I'd do with a 3/4x 1/2 copper T, and a 3/4x1/2 monoflow T downstream, about 12" apart. If you get the "scoop" style monoflow T, that comes first. Don't forget a 1/2" baseboard T and a coin vent at the TK, accessible for bleeding.
    HomerJSmith
  • Rich_49
    Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,766
    Options
    How many pieces of baseboard are there ?
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • jtz1229
    jtz1229 Member Posts: 3
    Options
    27' 5 pieces
  • jtz1229
    jtz1229 Member Posts: 3
    Options
    Thanks for everybody's help. It's always easier to have a plan before you start something.
  • Rich_49
    Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,766
    Options
    Instead of a series l o o p I suggest using a manifold / homerun approach . All the heat will receive the same temp water then and you won't have to worry about declining temps and comfort issues . The kickspace would get it's own homerun then also . Each piece of heat could then be adjusted flow wise for best performance and comfort .
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Options
    Assuming the emitters are placed around the perimeter of the house, I would pipe it in reverse return using PEX. Simple, inexpensive, and performs wonderfully.
  • markham56
    markham56 Member Posts: 2
    edited December 2019
    Options
    I have a 1928 home with cast iron radiators and a hot water boiler. Most of the home is toasty warm except the kitchen which has always been drafty and is furthest from the boiler.

    I usually have my thermostat set to 72 and the boiler will come on as needed to maintain that temperature.

    I just gutted my kitchen and replaced the radiator with a BeaconMorris K120 kickspace heater and low temp aquastat. The problem is that it will run in the morning when the boiler first fires up but doesn’t stay on long enough to heat the room. And during the day the boiler doesn’t heat up enough to trigger the aquastat. The kitchen stays about 6 degrees colder than other rooms.

    Any constructive, cost-effective suggestions? Thanks.
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 3,389
    edited December 2019
    Options
    Hi, You say the kitchen is drafty. I'm wondering if there are things you can do to reduce heat loss from that room. Damper on exhaust fan? Looking at it with an IR camera? Leaky windows to fix? As you gutted it, did you have opportunity to properly insulate walls? Suppose the thermostat could be moved closer to the kitchen, but that might just overheat the rest of the house. :o

    Yours, Larry
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,967
    Options
    markham56 said:

    I have a 1928 home with cast iron radiators and a hot water boiler. Most of the home is toasty warm except the kitchen which has always been drafty and is furthest from the boiler.



    I usually have my thermostat set to 72 and the boiler will come on as needed to maintain that temperature.



    I just gutted my kitchen and replaced the radiator with a BeaconMorris K120 kickspace heater and low temp aquastat. The problem is that it will run in the morning when the boiler first fires up but doesn’t stay on long enough to heat the room. And during the day the boiler doesn’t heat up enough to trigger the aquastat. The kitchen stays about 6 degrees colder than other rooms.



    Any constructive, cost-effective suggestions? Thanks.

    Foam the exterior walls behind the cabinets?
    Why don't you get hot enough water to trigger the fan stat?