Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.
Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.

Burnham ANS Z21-13A 1983

Azrael_Ak
Azrael_Ak Member Posts: 4
Hello there,
I have a Burnham ANS Z21-13A 1983 low pressure boiler in my home and have been getting gas bills saying I have been using 20-25CCF/mo. and during the summer months I have not turned the thermostat on once. Is it normal for a pilot light to use this much gas?

Thanks

Comments

  • RobG
    RobG Member Posts: 1,850
    Does it heat your hot water as well?
  • Azrael_Ak
    Azrael_Ak Member Posts: 4
    Nope just 100% Boiler. The hot water is on a different meter paid for by the landlord.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,943
    edited August 2015
    I use 25-30 CCF a month for hot water indirectly heated by boiler.
    Do you have a gas range or dryer?

    Just curious, if I may ask what does that 20-25 CCF cost per month?
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,837
    ANS Z21-13A 1983 is not the boiler's model number- it is the standard under which that boiler was designed and tested. Is this a steam or hot-water system?
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • Azrael_Ak
    Azrael_Ak Member Posts: 4
    Ahh well Sorry i could barely read the label. It is only the gas boiler....hot water heat. And the reason i am so concerned is...my gas bill was pretty high for not using ANY heat this summer.

    April, May, and June I was in between 20-25 ccf. I am not sure how it could change over the summer with no activity just being a pilot.

    We pay:
    Enstar customer charge: $14.00
    Service Charge (Base): 18.00 ccf @ .114200 $ 2.06
    Regulatory Cost Charge .289000% $ 0.08
    Total Enstar charges $16.14

    Supplier Gas Cost: 18.00 ccf @ .677070 $12.19

    Current Gas Charges------------------------------------$28.33

    This is my July bill. I quit using my heat back in April. Which is springtime in Alaska. :wink:

    Also if it isn't normal consumption for this... are there aftermarket pilot lights you can replace it with to be more efficient? I removed and replaced the ancient Honeywell mercury switch thermostat and installed a brand new digital Honeywell programmable switch.
  • Azrael_Ak
    Azrael_Ak Member Posts: 4
    That's over 100$ over the summer for not using any heat. Outrageous in my book :persevere:
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,837
    Look closely at the label- there should be some numbers stamped in it. If you post those numbers, one of them will probably be the model number. Also post a picture.

    Honeywell makes the Y8610 upgrade kit that will convert a standing pilot to electric ignition. But if we know the model number, one could probably get the upgrade parts from Burnham.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 8,943
    Does your bill show the meter readings, that is previous, present and amount used? There is always a minimum charge per month even with no usage.

    Also you could shut off the gas service valve at your boiler, if you have a standing pilot it will have to be relite for heating.
    You can then sharpie/pencil mark the hand position on the meter to see if it is actually rotating. I mark the 2 smallest increment dials carefully looking straight the dials. If you see any movement in an hour or day then gas is going somewhere else.
    I would say is your meter and you could shut it off, just be sure you have the right meter. Someone will speak up if there is no hot water etc.
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,480
    A pilot with a .018 size orifice at 7" W.C. pressure (pilots are not regulated through the gas valve) will burn about a cubic foot per hour. Depending on the cost per therm for gas a yearly bill for a pilot could be between 100 to 120 dollars a year. The charts for calculating this are found in the National Fuel Gas Code NFPA 54.