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Riello F5 Motor Replacement

Doug613
Doug613 Member Posts: 9
Hey guys/gals,
First post on the Wall! I have a Riello F5 motor that I have to replace as it is making a whining noise and don't know how long I got. Pump is fine and fan is not the problem. I have a pretty good idea on how to get it out of there but is there any pitfalls that I may encounter along the way?
I looked at it and would seem that I will have to remove the selonod from the pump and completely remove the pump, I'm hoping at that point I should have access to the motor housing?
One other question I see there is a Cap below the controller, is it in a discharged state after power is off?

Thanks for help in advance

Doug

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,132
    Can't speak to the mechanics of getting the motor out...

    But you never, ever, treat a capacitor as discharged until you have actually discharged it properly yourself.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    icesailorbilltwocase
  • Randy-LeeBraman
    Randy-LeeBraman Member Posts: 46
    fans like to seize to motor shafts be ready with a new one,have had to cut many off so i carry a couple of new ones in stock,one on the truck and one on the parts shelf at shop.
  • Doug613
    Doug613 Member Posts: 9
    Thanks guys for the comments, In response to Jamie. What is the correct way to discharge that Cap? To Randy. I will grab one and see what happens, will try some penetrating oil and hope for the best! So would there be anything else that you guys would have seen?

    Thanks
    Doug
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,132
    Doug -- you need to connect a resistor across it the terminals -- say 10 to 100 ohms -- and let it set for a bit. You can in a pinch use an incandescent light bulb -- say around 40 watts -- with clip leads.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    @Jamie:

    You mean a rubber chandelier with a 40 watt light bulb with insulated alligator clips?
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,132
    Yup
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    You can start a Cap start motor with a rubber chandelier as long as the start switch works.

    I learned that trick over 40 years ago from an old Scotts electrician. Gordon "Mac" MacDonald. No one believed me that it worked. Until I went to a Meet, eat and see session for Riello burners. I almost fell off the chair when the Riello guy told us to do that. Another Scotts man told me how to do a third world test on a capacitor.

    Take a cord whip with insulated alligator clips on the end. Clip them to the suspect Capacitor. Set on wooden counter. Plug cord whip into a 110 volt outlet. Count to 10. Unplug cord whip. Remove clips. Short across Cap terminals with a well insulated beater screwdriver. If it sparks, its good. If it doesn't spark, it isn't good.

    Works for the third world tech's.