Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

New Steamer Install

Options
2»

Comments

  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,700
    Options
    Steve said:

    I am not disagreeing. I am just explaining the thinking behind it
    And we have to follow Codes whatever they maybe

    Oh I know.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • SWEI
    SWEI Member Posts: 7,356
    Options
    Steve said:

    On the drip leg issue, This has been going back and forth between the local utility company and building department for the last number of years

    It comes straight out of NFPA 54 9.6.7 (which gets copied into UMC 1312.7, and on to numerous local codes, including NYC.)
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,538
    Options
    as for the missing dirt leg there was a picture on the internet, (maybe it was from this site) of someone in NYC hooking up a garden hose from a dirt leg to feed another appliance. Also in MA no dirt leg outdoors because they could collect moisture and freeze. That's probably why the NYC rule says dirt leg AFTER the appliance shut off.
  • HydroNiCK
    HydroNiCK Member Posts: 182
    edited March 2015
    Options
    I'm a plumber in NY.....You always need a drip leg. Also, you have to remember that NG is lighter than air. With The drip leg being after the shuttoff less gas sinks to the bottom of the drip leg when the boiler is running since it hits the burner first and anything powered after that might be gas starved.
  • Robert O'Connor_12
    Robert O'Connor_12 Member Posts: 728
    Options
    After working in hurricane ravaged Staten Island & hearing the same about the drip legs I opted to use them on EVERY install anyway. The Rapid Repair inspector/engineers didn't want them used.Most of the gas lines had to be blown out with compressed air/nitrogen. The residual moisture remained. After they paid to have us go back and replace gas valves and such on brand new equipment, they then encouraged their use. As a matter of fact, the longer the better!
    SWEI
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,700
    Options

    After working in hurricane ravaged Staten Island & hearing the same about the drip legs I opted to use them on EVERY install anyway. The Rapid Repair inspector/engineers didn't want them used.Most of the gas lines had to be blown out with compressed air/nitrogen. The residual moisture remained. After they paid to have us go back and replace gas valves and such on brand new equipment, they then encouraged their use. As a matter of fact, the longer the better!

    I had wondered this when piping my stuff but I was told length didn't matter? ;)

    I think I used 5" nipples and caps or something close to that. Is there ever a reason to remove the cap to drain or clean it?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Robert O'Connor_12
    Robert O'Connor_12 Member Posts: 728
    Options
    Drip leg/dirt legs became necessary because long ago we used manufactured gas which had a high moisture and particulate content. Any length is fine so long as there is a need for it. In my case, all the houses were under 8 feet of water. The water overcame the 6 inches of pressure you were receiving from the utility and thus forced it's way into every inch of that piping. We blew out the piping the best we could so as to quickly restore heat to all. Long and short of it all Imho, with todays natural gas, you really don't need them but I always install them. In fact, many times I pipe it to the floor to act as a support. In the case of Staten Island....you need em', & you need em' long!
    vaporvac
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,700
    Options

    Drip leg/dirt legs became necessary because long ago we used manufactured gas which had a high moisture and particulate content. Any length is fine so long as there is a need for it. In my case, all the houses were under 8 feet of water. The water overcame the 6 inches of pressure you were receiving from the utility and thus forced it's way into every inch of that piping. We blew out the piping the best we could so as to quickly restore heat to all. Long and short of it all Imho, with todays natural gas, you really don't need them but I always install them. In fact, many times I pipe it to the floor to act as a support. In the case of Staten Island....you need em', & you need em' long!

    That's how the one on my parent's 1958 forced air furnace was. Had to be a good 18" long right down to the floor.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • jonny88
    jonny88 Member Posts: 1,139
    Options
    Moe beautiful install and it takes a lot of courage to post.i know you broke your **** on that one and you should take great pride in it but it is a very educated audience and this is how we all get better.i posted a steam boiler which I was proud of and asked for critiques on it.steamhead gave me some which I addressed and she works like a charm.in regards to drop legs I always use them.thanks for posting and you should have a very happy customer