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Modcons in Closets-

ced48
ced48 Member Posts: 469
Are the ventilation requirements different than those for non direct vent units?

Comments

  • heatpro02920
    heatpro02920 Member Posts: 991
    yes

    An appliance that uses outside combustion air has different indoor space requirements than a unit that doesn't... Check the local code and manufacturers specs...
  • ced48
    ced48 Member Posts: 469
    Lochinvar's Language Is

    from the code that covers appliances that take their combustion air from the interior, so I question the requirements-Local's are going to tell me to go by national code, which I am having trouble finding reference to sealed combustion units.
  • heatpro02920
    heatpro02920 Member Posts: 991
    Tim will know this

    Thats who I would ask...
  • heatpro02920
    heatpro02920 Member Posts: 991
    Tim will know this

    Thats who I would ask...
  • ced48
    ced48 Member Posts: 469
    A Little More Research-

    and it looks like codes may require just the opposite for bedroom and bath locations, no ventilation, and sealing of the door. Well, now I'm really getting confused. All air for combustion is from the exterior, why would Lochinvar be requiring room air to be to be added to the closet? Maybe heat buildup?
  • Eric_32
    Eric_32 Member Posts: 267
    What model

    what model are you referring to?
  • ced48
    ced48 Member Posts: 469
    Lochinvar WH55

    Never firing at more than 60%-
  • Eric_32
    Eric_32 Member Posts: 267
    OK....

    This is what's going on, now that we have a model number.



    IN the install manual, http://www.lochinvar.com/_linefiles/WH-I-O-Rev%20P.pdf



    the model 055 can be installed in a closet or alcove.



    A closet is a room the boiler is installed in that has a volume less than 90 Cubic Feet ( for the 055)



    If this is SO, then you have to use either CPVC, Polypropylene or Stainless for the vent material due to amout of heat generator in the room.



    No air ventilation openings into the room are needed when clearances around the Knight boiler are at least equal to the Service clearances shown in the manual.



    For spaces that do NOT supply this clearance, provide two openings as shown in FIG 1-1



    The openings are not for combustion they are to cool the space.



    The issue you are having with the boiler not firing over 60% has nothing to do with this.



    Parameters are controlling the firing rate.
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    Combustion air/sealed combustion:

    It would seem to me that unless the air intake is directly connected to the burner blower, and gets ALL make-up and combustion air through the outside connection, you can run the risk of using up excess air in a bedroom if the unit is run with the cover off. And the covers aren't all that tight. Then there's the issue of ventilation in the door.

    Sounds like a "Camel's nose under the tent". thing. Once the nose is under the tent flap, and smells that's there, the camel wants the whole tent.

    "What do you mean it's wrong? The Code says 96" developed, I'm only 2" past that at 98". No, you have to include the two 90's and the 45* in the total developed length. You need to go up in size. Its in the I/O manual. Didn't you read it?
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    I can hear the inspector:

    "But it's never fired at more than 60%-"

    But it CAN be fired at 100%. It has the POTENTIAL of being fired at 100%.

    Or like the sign one of our former inspectors proudly displayed on the wall in his office:

    "Arguing with an inspector is like trying to catch a greased pig. You'll never know how much fun the pig is having".
  • Gordan
    Gordan Member Posts: 891
    Not for nothing, but...

    It seems that you'd be more likely to use up bedroom air with the closet door open rather than closed.
  • ced48
    ced48 Member Posts: 469
    No Need to Get Nasty-

    Units like these installed in bedrooms had to be in closets with sealed, solid , air tight, self closing doors at one point. Now, the lochinvar manual is calling for requirements that fit units that draw their combustion air from the interior space.



    I'm not an idiot, this is confusing- The TT manual has no such ventilation requirements for closet installed units, as far as I can see- So-
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,569
    Heat

    I believe they are concerned that the limited space inside the closet will cause the room to get too warm which would potentially over heat the flue pipe.

    Install per manual with PP piping and you should be all set.

    Carl
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
  • ced48
    ced48 Member Posts: 469
    I Assumed the Only

    reason for the ventilation might be the temperature of the closet. Triangle Tube asks that the ambient temperature not become to high. What would a reasonable maximum temperature be? If the closet stays at 85 degrees or so, is this reasonable? The temperature inside the boiler cabinet is certainly higher than this ? Never could it become high enough to melt the poly exhaust pipe.



    I just would like to be able to leave the door shut at times to quiet the thing down when it does it's pre and post purges. Boiler is in a den, not a bedroom, and operates at a max of 60% by my choice, not some problem.