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High Velocity Heating System

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k2p2
k2p2 Member Posts: 5
I'd like to install small ductwork heating in my home in Seattle to replace hydronics.  I have found two companies that specialize in these systems: Unico and SpacePak.  It has not been exactly straightforward dealing with either of these companies..they don't seem to have installers in my area and the sales reps do not even live in my state.  Are these high velocity systems not very popular?  Also, I've been reading about how loud they can be.  Any thoughts about the noise factor?  Thanks in advance for your advice.

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  • Ironman
    Ironman Member Posts: 7,399
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    Bad Idea

    There's nothing wrong with high velocity if it's done right, but you'll regret trying to replace a good hydronic system with it. If you want it for a/c, that's fine, but don't use it to replace your hydronic system.
    Bob Boan
    You can choose to do what you want, but you cannot choose the consequences.
  • k2p2
    k2p2 Member Posts: 5
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    Hydronics bad...not good?

    Bob,



    I don't know if my hydronic arrangement is good or not.  There are two 60 gallon hot water tanks in my garage.  It's an open system with pex-al-pex orange tubing going throughout the house.  The tubes provide hot water to fan-coil units in the home.

    It doesn't seem very efficient and the fan-coil units are very noisy and drafty.  Additionally, I've always been nervous about one of the tubes leaking.
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,578
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    High velocity noise

    The high velocity system will certainly have the same air noise, so perhaps no improvement there. I think you should find an hydronics expert, and repair any deficiencies in the system you have.

    Anytime you use a blower to move air, there is a potential for noise, which rises with the velocity.

    There may be someone on this site in your area with the expertise to fix what you have.--NBC
  • unicoshannon
    unicoshannon Member Posts: 2
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    Unico

    Unico small duct high velocity heating and air conditioning systems install and performs very well with hydronic systems, we have been marrying the two technologies together on the east coast for decades to great effect.  This is not a situation where you have to sacrifice one to get the other, both can be used to create superior comfort in your home.  Please feel free to contact me so that we can discuss your situation and how we can assist you.  I can be reached at 314-422-3264.

    thank you







     

     

     

     



     

     

     
  • unicoshannon
    unicoshannon Member Posts: 2
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    Unico

    Unico small duct high velocity heating and air conditioning systems install and performs very well with hydronic systems, we have been marrying the two technologies together on the east coast for decades to great effect.  This is not a situation where you have to sacrifice one to get the other, both can be used to create superior comfort in your home.  Please feel free to contact me so that we can discuss your situation and how we can assist you.  I can be reached at 314-422-3264.

    thank you







     

     

     

     



     

     

     
  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,658
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    Open Systems in Seattle

    Unfortunately, you have a system installed that doesn't work well, uses excessive energy, has a risk of Legionella contamination and makes noise. They were installed because of low initial costs and increased builder's profits. A quality hydronic system will give great comfort (and no noise) but will require some of the walls and ceilings to be exposed to retrofit. Then there is the cost to do it right. I've installed plenty of SpacePak and Unico systems, but would not recommend them for heating unless A/C was a priority. Since we have only 3-5 cooling days yearly in Seattle, and over 240 days requiring a heating load, the decision is sort of obvious. I always recommend wall panel radiators and a mod-con boiler for this type of retrofit.
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