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Can i relocate a steam radiator?

JD424
JD424 Member Posts: 7
Hi All

I have a steam system and I have on Radiator in front of a bay window that is preventing me from getting a couch to fit. I would like to move it over about 1'. Can I remove the valve install a 1" elbow and 1' pipe and then re instal a inline valve and connect it to the Rad? Would there be any problems so long as I kept the pitch somewhat correct?



I would love to do this under the floor since I have access to it but the pipes are covered with what could possibly be asbestos and Im sure no one wants to disturb that especially me. Also the Rad is not at the end of the pipe so it would be a nightmare to start re piping everything downstairs.



Any suggestions ?

Comments

  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,296
    Got any pictures?

    I've seen people extend them by adding a nipple and a coupling between the spud and the radiator, but I think the way you've described looks better. You can also put another elbow between the runout and the riser so the riser comes up a little to the left or right of its current position.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • JD424
    JD424 Member Posts: 7
    edited March 2012
    Pictures

    Here is a Picture from below and one from above. I want the radiator to go over a foot to the left. From below I was also thinking rather than disturb the pipe with the insulation on it remove the nipple that goes up through the floor and replace it with a 1" 90 Degree street elbow run a 12" or 8" nipple horizontal to the floor and then a 90 degree and nipple up through the floor . That would keep the piping under the floor. Only thing is to get the 90 degree street into the existing is gonna be tight may have to use a crow bar to try to pull it back from the wall. Or do i try to remove the existing 90 and replace it with a union ?



    Does this make sense or am I crazy?



    J
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,373
    You're not crazy

    but the problem is the valve.  That connects to the radiator with a union, and to replace the valve with a different one you're either going to have to be really lucky and find a valve with a matching union to the spud in the radiator, or get the spud in the radiator out -- which can be done, but isn't as easy as it looks.
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • JD424
    JD424 Member Posts: 7
    Lucky

    I just replaced the valve with a new one and the brands matched but I have had to take the spud out too even with the tool it was a pipe wrench with a 6' pipe over the handle and 2 people standing in the rad on its side it did suck! but i was real gentle and I was able to do it. I posted some pics from the floor below and would rather go that route so there is no pipe showing on the main floor whats your thoughts on that ?



    J
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 15,373
    So long

    as the pitches are correct, it won't really matter whether you jog over below or above the floor.



    You were lucky to get that spud out... !
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,296
    You said it!

    I always shear those little ears right off. I don't know why I even bought a spud wrench. Think we ought to get this guy's number and give him a call when we need a spud taken out? :-)
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • JD424
    JD424 Member Posts: 7
    edited March 2012
    Got some Advice

    From a guy today who said best way to do this was to break the elbow with a hammer to remove it without harming the threads and put a union on the existing feed and then pipe it to where I want the Rad and go up through the floor. Im a little apprehensive to whack away at a elbow.. Is this the best approach? He also said to spray the insulation with water to stop it from becoming airborn.



    J
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,296
    Here's what I'd try

    Ordinarily I'd remove the riser from above (remove the valve, slide the radiator out of the way, put a cap on the pipe to try to keep it from egging and put a couple of biiiig wrenches on with their jaws staggered about 90 degrees, and work up a sweat). Then I'd take a close nipple and screw it in, the try to screw a 45 down on top of it. If I can get that tight and pointing the right way, I'd put in a long enough nipple to get me over to where you want it to come up. (This is where your trigonometry comes in handy. Didn't your math teacher tell you you'd need it someday?) Then put another 45 on the end of that and twist it around to point up. Then you can punch the new riser through the floor.



    The trouble with putting a street elbow into another elbow is that you'd be wildly lucky to get it pointing the right way once it gets tight. Fittings are a lot harder than pipe, and you can't keep turning them after they get tight.



    I'm not crazy about working around asbestos either. When I discover some I just have someone qualified come and remove it. Then it's gone. It's not out there lurking and getting in the way. It's expensive and a pain in the neck, but at least we're in better shape than the poor guys who put it there.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
  • Hap_Hazzard
    Hap_Hazzard Member Posts: 2,296
    A friend of mine died of mesothelioma.

    I think I'd rather just go out and shoot myself than whack away at an asbestos-wrapped pipe with a hammer for a an hour or two.



    First of all, we don't know if that's malleable or hard cast iron. Second, neither one is a piece of cake. You should try it sometime under safer circumstances to gain an appreciation of how hard it can be; then you can imagine how much asbestos dust you'd be kicking up in the process.
    Just another DIYer | King of Prussia, PA
    1983(?) Peerless G-561-W-S | 3" drop header, CG400-1090, VXT-24
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