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Flooded Appliances

JStar
JStar Member Posts: 2,752
Living, working in NJ...we got rocked by the hurricane. I've been condemning any gas appliance that has been completely submerged in water, and have been very particular about any repairs that I find to be safe and practical. The day the hurricane rolled in, I spoke to my manager, advising them about the protocol for flood-damaged appliances. It seems that no other technician is following that policy. Even my company president has never heard about it. I've handed in a few different articles on the subject, but he wants more proof. Is there any article, or document that defines the law or regulation regarding these matters? So far, I've found documents from GAMA, AHRI, and the NJ State Police. What more could there be?

Comments

  • lchmb
    lchmb Member Posts: 2,997
    If

    If you check with any manufacturer related to gas they will put in writing to replace an appliance that has been submerged.
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Effects of water on regulators.....

    Natural gas regulators work on the principal if the differential of atmospheric pressure on the bellows or diaphragm, which is a thin membrane and the spring tension that is applied to the assembly.  Just add a little water and it WILL NOT WORK as designed!.  Look at Maxitrol sites or any dedicated regulator manufacturer and you will find that any contamination call for replacement if the Combination valve in your case or a dedicated step regulator.  Notice that almost all adjustment screws for valves have a tiny pin hole in the screw head.  This is to alleviate air that builds up atop the diaphragm.  If air is trapped and cannot be relieved, the bellows or diaphragm cannot properly self adjust to accommodate the flow of the gas. 

       I personally would not take the chance of putting back into service any valve or regulator that has been saturated with, water, Ice, or any liquid which can alter the operation of the part.

    Just an opinion.  Consult you local gas supplier and they will tell you the same.



    Mike T.
  • JStar
    JStar Member Posts: 2,752
    ...

    I'm aware of the safety and functional hazards. I'm looking for some sort of statement that I can print and hand out around the company. Word of mouth isn't good enough, I suppose. 
  • lchmb
    lchmb Member Posts: 2,997
    well

    You have documentation from 3 agency's so far, how many do they want to prove you right?
  • JStar
    JStar Member Posts: 2,752
    ...

    I don't know why...this industry has a tendency to attract very stubborn individuals. I think the biggest problem is the lack of education with some of the other technicians. They've been blowing out gas lines and lighting pilots all week because they get paid more for repairs than they do for condemning systems. Then they convince our supervisor that it's okay because they've been doing it like that for years with no problem. So, I'm the only guy out there who is actually locking-out units.
  • lchmb
    lchmb Member Posts: 2,997
    the good part

    You'll also be the only guy who doesnt get dragged into court. Like I said, check with Honeywell or any gas valve manufacturer. And doing it wrong for all these years does not suddenly mean it's better...just means they have more chances to kill someone...
  • CMadatMe
    CMadatMe Member Posts: 3,085
    Flood Statements

    Contact the manufactures of equipment. They all have sent out flood statements and want equipment replaced not repaired.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
  • icesailor
    icesailor Member Posts: 7,265
    Liability on Flooded Gas Appliances:

    Tell the bean counters and the thick heads to call their liability insurance carriers and ask them for permission to do what they are doing. Or give them a waiver. The insurance carriers will not do it.

    If the insurance carriers that cover your liability policy won't approve it, the company leaders are complete fools.

    Ask the insurance companies. The answer will be "NO" and they may require you to go back and disconnect appliances or get waivers from the customers.

    In Massachusetts, you can't sign your rights away with a waiver when something is wrong or dangerous.

    What simple fools. What does the Gas AHJ have to say about this? If the AHJ approves, get it in writing.
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,480
    See the other posting

    on this subject on the Wall.
  • JStar
    JStar Member Posts: 2,752
    Well...

    One of my last calls of the day was a call-back on a water heater that another technician dried out and re-lit last week. The combustion chamber suffered a minor explosion. The owner heard a loud bang overnight. The sight glass was blacked out and the tank sprung a leak....I don't think I'll be needing anymore documents on the matter.
  • lchmb
    lchmb Member Posts: 2,997
    well

    Glad to hear no one was hurt...Hard way to make your point..
This discussion has been closed.