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A modest proposal...

Well, It is kind of early in the process, but I get the idea that not many people want to comment on what they do or don't do as it pertains to CO detection and prevention. I understand. You never know when a hungry attorney might be lurking over your shoulder. So, instead of a survey, how about we develop a "Best Practice" recommendation as it pertains to CO.



We can all input into this list the things we HAVE to look for, and what actions should be taken if higher than normal CO levels are found. We can also generate a list for the building occupants. Remember, education of EVERYONE is critical if this is going to work.



In the end, we will have a living, breathing, continually growing document. I am sure Dan will not mind posting it in the Library for everyones use. I will format everything and put it into its printable format (PDF).



I'll start. The name of the document, BEST PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING CARBON MONOXIDE. (subject to change if someone has something snappier.



CUSTOMER NAME:

CUSTOMER ADDRESS:

CUSTOMER TELEPHONE #:

ALTITUDE OF OPERATION:

FUEL SOURCES FOR FIRED APPLIANCES (LP, NG, OIL, WOOD)

FIRED APPLIANCE INVENTORY: List ALL appliances that operate with a flame.

under each fired appliance, the following information should be obtained;



AIR FREE CO,

CO2,

OXYGEN,

STACK TEMPERATURE,

EXCESS AIR,

STACK PRESSURE

COMBUSTION CHAMBER PRESSURE

MANIFOLD PRESSURE PRE REGULATOR,

MANIFOLD PRESSURE POST REGULATOR.

FUEL PRESSURE (OIL).



VENTING SYSTEM: TYPE PIPE INSPECTION TERMINATION INSPECTION.



COMBUSTION AIR: CORRECTLY SIZED (how many square inches per 1000 btuH)



STACK PRESSURE UNDER NORMAL CONSIDERATION:



STACK PRESSURE UNDER WORST CASE DEPRESSURIZATION.



DID BACK DRAFTING OCCUR? YES NO



Beneath each appliance should be three boxes, with a place for the technicians initials and the customers acknowledgement initials with the following check boxes.

APPLIANCE CONDITIONS: GOOD POOR DANGER, NEED FOR IMMEDIATE SERVICE AND OR ACTION. APPLIANCE HAS BEEN DISABLED.



CHEMICAL STORAGE: ARE THERE ANY DANGEROUS CHEMICALS IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY OF THE APPLIANCE?



I am sure there is more, and appreciate anyone else's input. My stomach thinks my throats been cut (hunger) will check back later.



If we can save just one life...



ME
It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.

Comments

  • MikeyB
    MikeyB Member Posts: 696
    edited March 2010
    Best Practice

    Great Idea Mark, how about adding these items to the list.

    -Level's of CO  in ambient air, inside and outside

    -Are CO detectors in place and are operational

    -Is there an attatched garage to the structure.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    Excellent additions...

    Maybe we should also add, "Last time batteries were changed on detectors"



    Thanks for the input Mikey.



    Anyone else?



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • MikeyB
    MikeyB Member Posts: 696
    Detectors

    Sounds good ME, also the CO detectors and smoke detectors have expiration dates on them, 5-7years or so
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,180
    This is terrific.

    When you're finished and in agreement, I can add this to the new CO section of the Library if you'd like. 
    Retired and loving it.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    edited March 2010
    Absolutely....

    As I said, it will be a living breathing, growing document, and we can update it as needed. It will eventually stabilize as a document. It will be in the Library for perpetuity.



    Here is take one. Awaiting additional input.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,180
    Retired and loving it.
  • Jean-David Beyer
    Jean-David Beyer Member Posts: 2,666
    Boiler in attached garage...

    In your "ATTACHED GARAGE RECOMMENDATIONS" section, item 6, you say, "6. Never operate any other gas fired appliances in an enclosed garage." To what does "any other" refer? For example, I have my home heating boiler in my garage. I also have my indirect-fired hot water heater there, but it could have been a gas fired one.



    It seems to me, as a non-professional, that it would be OK to have both items in an attached garage, provided, of course that the air supply to the various devices, and the venting connections were according to manufacturers' specifications and also conformed to local codes. The cited part of your recommendations seems, to me, to need this item clarified.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    edited March 2010
    Word should have been

    GASOLINE or DIESEL powered item, like lawn mowers, generators.



    As it pertains to using NG fired equipment in the garage, code requires the lowest flame to be 18" above the finished floor to avoid igniting liquid vapors (gas, diesel).



    It is perfectly legal in most places I work to have appliances in a garage, but there are a WHOLE other set of requirements that most HVZC contractors understand that would apply.



    Thanks for your input.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,814
    I'd add

    'level of sensitivity of CO detector.' or the brand, model etc. big box stores sell units that i think don't indicate below 20ppm if that, while NSI or Efficiency Experts units go down as far as 6ppm or lower. This process would educate the consumer on the difference.
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,556
    edited March 2010
    FVIR water heaters do not have to

    be 18" off the floor.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,839
    Shows you what type of tank style water heater I last installed....

    ... Didn't EVEN have FVIR back in the day :-)



    Also got your other recommendations via email Tim.



    Thanks for contributing and correcting.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
This discussion has been closed.