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High CO levels on Burnham P Series

MacPHJr
MacPHJr Member Posts: 66
I am getting a CO Level of 440 ppm in the stack of the boiler. The customer would like to have the house air sealed but the weatherization company wont do it unless the CO levels are below 100 in the stack. How can I lower the CO levels in the stack

Comments

  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,837
    Lot's to do...

    Go here and read this first.



    http://www.heatinghelp.com/files/posts/2566/Everything%20You%20Wanted%20to%20Know%20about%20CO....pdf



    It's is either too much gas or too little air, or possibly just dirty burners.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Good Morning Mark:

    Nice article.  I am what you call a collector of information since reference material is sometimes at a premium.  For the young guy's,...Eat this stuff up since it may just save your life or the lives of others.  This stuff is free and always a great read.  O become an educator and educate the masses.



    Again thanks mark for all you do.



    Mike T.
  • Mark Eatherton
    Mark Eatherton Member Posts: 5,837
    No problem Mike

    Am here to contribute and help. It's a community of learning.



    ME
    It's not so much a case of "You got what you paid for", as it is a matter of "You DIDN'T get what you DIDN'T pay for, and you're NOT going to get what you thought you were in the way of comfort". Borrowed from Heatboy.
  • Tim McElwain
    Tim McElwain Member Posts: 4,481
    First make sure

    that you are not over gassed, This can be checked by simply clocking the burner on the test dials on the gas meter.



    Next check the inlet and outlet gas pressure to the unit, on most gas valves today this can be done right at the valve.



    Insure that the boiler is clean and that there is no blockage.



    Make sure the burners are properly aligned and not out of position and impinging on some cooler surface. Pull the burners and clean them.



    Is there adequate air for combustion in the combustion zone?



    I assume you took other readings with a combustion analyzer, what are they?



    Is this equipment flued into a lined masonry chimney or a "B" Vent?



    If you give me the input in BTU's and the number of burners I can calculate the orifice size required for you.
  • MacPHJr
    MacPHJr Member Posts: 66
    Thanks

    Hi Tim, I havent been to the site yet. The Co levels were sent to me via email from the energy audit company we are partners with. They do there own testing and when they encounter problems they call us in to make repairs or do service. I will be there tomm and do all of my own testing. I will definitely let you know. Thanks.



    Also, i wanted to thank Mark for the article he posted. I actually was with the local fire chief today and he is attending a conference on CO. I dropped off the article in his office and he was going to make copies for all the firefighters. He was very thankful and appreciated the info as did we. Thanks again
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