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hot water Radiators and Single Entry valve

hello
has anyone converted steam radiators to hot water ?
i have located a single entry valve "with immersion pipe for radiators with a single entry" for conversion of a steam radiator to forced hot water. (i know about difference between actual steam radiators and radiators that can be used for either steam or hot water - this valve would be used on the radiator that could be converted to hot water).....

this is available from www.hydronicalternatives.com and is item 1185 for side entry and there is another model for a bottom feed.

This seemed like it might be better and easier alternative than a two pipe setup to each hot water radiator.
please let me know if anyone is familar with this or has any suggestions. thank you.

Comments

  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,122
    ah...

    are you converting a steam system to hydronic? If so, may I ask why? Steam is easy to get running properly, and just as good (if not better) quality heat. If you are converting, there are a lot of things to consider...

    and most of the folks on the Wall would not recommend doing it!
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Matthew Grallert
    Matthew Grallert Member Posts: 109


    I would recomend it stongly and I have used these valves many many times. Forget about the old piping and use a manifold and pex. By converting to water you have amazing control over the system with the use of a reset control, I like AQ2000 series. And the living space with the use of thermostatic heads mounted right on the single entry valves. I like to use coventional rad vlave for the first floor simply for the preservation of the old time look. and I use the SEVs for the second and above floors with the supply and return piping hidden in a single pipe of an appropriate size. The control and saving will be worth it.
    Peace
    Matthew
  • rich on heat
    rich on heat Member Posts: 47


    hi Jamie -
    No not converting. i've learned from all the posts this is not the best or easiest thing to do...

    i have a bunch of salvaged radiators i wanted to use in a restoration. the house has absolutely NO heat whatsoever in vermont. was heated with wood. i really wanted to instal steam, but no one wants to run black pipe.
    so i am looking at how to use them for hot water.

    would you know to test a radiator for 10-12 PSI needed for hot water prior to placing it in the house? all the radiators are capable of hot water.
    thank you!
  • rich on heat
    rich on heat Member Posts: 47


    Matthew
    Thanks so much for the info. Do you know how to test a radiator for 10-12 psi prior to placing it in the house?
    I am running pex probably in the walls - in vermont - i plan to strapped out the walls over the insulation to provide an area to run this under the sheetrock. would this need further insulation? and would this be correct? this eliminated drilling through all the joists and further degradating the support.
    thanks so much for your help....much peace to you. thank you.
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 17,122
    Good show!

    I know about wood heated Vermont houses -- lived in one in Brookfield for years and years. Don't blame you a bit for going to something you don't have to split and carry! Pity you can't find someone to spin pipe -- but those folks are a bit thin on the ground (my teacher has died, or I'd suggest him! -- and I don't live there any more).

    Easiest way to test the radiator that I can think of, if you have the height, is to set it all up with the valve and all then run a hose or pipe up 20 feet and fill it all with water. If the water level drops, she's leaking. If not, she isn't.

    If there is insulation in your outside walls, and the pex is inside the insulation and just covered by sheetrock, you shouldn't need anything more (even in Vermont!) but I won't guarantee anything... !
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
  • Matthew Grallert
    Matthew Grallert Member Posts: 109


    Hi first off the best thing to do is rinse out the acorns and chipmunks and test with air. I also find that if there is a water leak it will usually seal up, kind of a gamble for a customer but if its your place well you know. most of the rads will seal. And in my opinion there is no such thing as too much insulation. Have fun man.
    Peace
    Matthew
  • rich on heat
    rich on heat Member Posts: 47
    psi test for radiators

    hi thanks for the ongoing info. How would you test with air please? that was the direction we thought to go - but did not know the mechanics of how to do it......
    as for acorns! ....found a wall filled with them - thousands of them. and one can never have too much insulation. am making the walls as close to SIP design as possible. please let me know how to air test the radiators for 12 psi. thanks.
This discussion has been closed.