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Can my Burhman V8H Run off Kerosene?

Popalopkis
Popalopkis Member Posts: 1
I have a Burnham V8h boiler, and someone i know is selling 100 gallons of k1 for really cheap. i was curious, my landlord wasnt sure if it is able to run kerosene, but we are almost out of oil and Irving requires too much for a minimum delivery for us to afford. But before i go and throw that much in it I wanted to be sure I wasnt going to cause any damage

Comments

  • burnerman_2
    burnerman_2 Member Posts: 297
    YES ... the reason most don't is it's usually at a higher price. It will burn cleaner than # 2 fuel oil...You get less BTU's from it but if it's cheap I say go ahead
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,777
    It'll burn hotter too, won't it? Will burner manufacturer's have a problem with honoring warranties burning kerosene?
    Steve Minnich
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,725
    100 gallons once aint gonna kill you. It will run a little different. More important is to make sure it's actually clean. Hasn't been sitting for years, no water in it, wasn't pumped out of someone elses tank, etc.
    steve
  • burnerman_2
    burnerman_2 Member Posts: 297
    It will not burn hotter,,, kero is only 135,000 BTU per gallon Fuel oil 140,000 ... give or take
  • Kakashi
    Kakashi Member Posts: 88
    It could cause some tank problems or fix tank problems. We use it sometimes on tanks that have sludge problems or gelling problems. Worst case scenario you may have to change the oil filter once or twice. If it's junk from someone else's tank than I wouldn't touch it.
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
    It will run great, but ant prolonged use of Kero, and your fuel pump may fail. Little to no lube in Kero
  • CMadatMe
    CMadatMe Member Posts: 3,086
    For any professional to tell any person that it is ok to burn a fuel not approved by the Mfg of the equipment is plain irresponsible.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
  • burnerman_2
    burnerman_2 Member Posts: 297
    so if a customer had an outside tank weather was 10 below? it is wrong to use kerosene to keep your fuel oil from jelling.. and it sounds like a one time deal.. most lit. pretty sure says #1 or # 2 oil .. kerosene is #1
    billtwocase
  • Jason_13
    Jason_13 Member Posts: 299
    This is what the I&O manual states;
    This boiler is designed to burn No. 2 fuel oil only. Do not use gasoline, crankcase drainings, or any
    oil containing gasoline. Never burn garbage or paper in this boiler. Do not convert to any solid fuel
    (i.e. wood, coal). Do not convert to any gaseous fuel (i.e. natural gas, LP). All flammable debris, rags,
    paper, wood scraps, etc., should be kept clear of the boiler at all times. Keep the boiler area clean and
    free of fire hazards.
    CMadatMe
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,075
    Chris said:

    For any professional to tell any person that it is ok to burn a fuel not approved by the Mfg of the equipment is plain irresponsible.

    What if the information they are giving is 100% correct?

    Apparently only #2 fuel oil is approved.
    What about Diesel? Isn't Diesel identical to #2 fuel oil except for road taxes?
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
    I guess with that healthy advice, we should stop treating the fuel with water absorbents and other tank treatments. I guess the dead men didn't know anything either
  • CMadatMe
    CMadatMe Member Posts: 3,086
    edited January 2016
    I feel that there is a difference between a professional going to the job, assuring the burner is running properly, inspecting the system and making sure its safe, then telling a homeowner or any non professional that its ok for them to use an alternative fuel source via a web post, phone call or any other means other then being on the job.

    I also believe that the professional should disclose to the homeowner what the manual states. Allow the homeowner to make a full educated decision and the possible repercussions from that decision.

    That's what professional's do.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
    I can almost agree with what you are saying
    LPGasman
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
    Maybe all this time, that is why Burnham had so many leakers?
  • CMadatMe
    CMadatMe Member Posts: 3,086
    edited January 2016

    If we use that approach, there would be no Heating Help forum whatsoever.

    A visit to the site would be mandatory before we could advise on changing a nozzle or some electrodes or a gas valve or a thermocouple because there always MIGHT be another variable that we did not anticipate.

    Call up a car dealer/service mechanic and describe a problem or ask them if you can do something. Do they diagnose over the phone? No, they may suggest an idea but that's always followed up with, bring the car in. Now I know a homeowner can't bring his house to you but shouldn't the consumers safety and industry professionalism mean something? Think there's too much, "its always been that way" excuse so to speak. Not directed at you just in general throughout the industry.

    Giving someone advice to a problem on any forum is no more then an assumption, guess or past experience but most here for instance always follow up with "Find a Professional" when it concerns the combustion process or possible safety concerns.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 13,075
    How about apples to apples. Go to any car forum, post a problem and see how many people diagnose the problem without seeing the car. Comparing a forum to a car dealership is a bit ridiculous.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • rick in Alaska
    rick in Alaska Member Posts: 1,378
    I can' t even buy #2 diesel from my heating supplier up here. The only thing sold around here is #1 fuel oil, and we have absolutely no issues whatsoever with it. The fuel pumps handle it just fine, and so do the boilers.
    Rick
  • billtwocase
    billtwocase Member Posts: 2,385
    I can see the point that Chris is trying to make here, and it does remind that not all should be armed with a screwdriver or a wrench, but people that come here in search of help are usually caught between continually paying for poor service and constant reoccurring issues. I would rather they come here for maybe just an educated guess, then to experiment and cause harm without direction. Keep in mind that this is also done without a fee. You can give any kind of advice to anybody. What they do from there is up to them.
    HatterasguyCMadatMe
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,725
    I stand by my advice, as well as the combined advice of the others. The OP asked if he could dump some kerosene in the tank and use it. I took that as a one time thing, and gave the same advice I would give to my customers, with the caveat to make sure it's clean, has no debris/water etc.
    Like Rick in Alaska (and up there in Canada), #1 is the standard fuel. I used to have a chart that told you what mixes of #2/#1 would lower the pour point to what temperature. This was routinely done, and also done in diesel engines in very cold weather environments.
    Now I can add a winter blend when I load at the rack, so I haven't mixed in #2/#1 for years.
    Also, if you strictly follow the manufacturer, no mention of ULSD, or any bio mixes, which we know work up to B5 with no problems (at least I haven't seen any in 4+ years now).
    If the OP wanted to ALWAYS run straight #1, then I would've advised to have a tech come out and check the combustion, and warned about some issues that may pop up as billtwocase stated.
    Despite the wonderful world of sue happy people, this advise is not ill-advised or 'irresponsible'.
    Maybe the original poster can pop back on and tell us in a few weeks how he dumped the fuel in and had no problems. Yes it will clean out the tank, and may shorten the life of the filter, but so does the bio/ulsd fuels. The first 2/3 years the filters looked awful on annual services, now they are starting to look pretty good. In situations with double filtration (my house for example), I went 3 years with hardly any change in vacuum.
    The thing I find irresponsible, is calling other people irresponsible without considering there level of knowledge and experience.
    BTW, if you noticed, not one person (and some of the best weighed in) came on and stated, based on their experience, not to do it.
    steve
  • CMadatMe
    CMadatMe Member Posts: 3,086
    edited January 2016
    Steve my point is, that yes, it's ok to advise that it can be used and I agree it can as long as he is aware of what the mfg says and it should also be followed up that he should have a pro check his boiler, inspect it and put an analyzer on it once he puts the Kero in the tank.

    I'll say it again, to advise anyone to put an alternative fuel into a piece of equipment without advising them to make sure a professional inspects it is irresponsible in my opinion.
    "The bitter taste of a poor installation remains much longer than the sweet taste of the lowest price."