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anyone doing T Drill?

Kniggit
Kniggit Member Posts: 123
The T-Drill will put a flange on it much like the factory headers have, and a standard solder joint might work for temporary use (read emergency) only. We have always brazed the joints.

Comments

  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,490
    anyone doing T Drill?

    I buy header stock from the local vendors, I pay well over a 100 bucks for a 1" copper by 24 (1/2" ) take off.

    Has anyone bought the T Drill set up? I suppose you need to braze the stubs? Any code issues? I suppose not for residential heating in mass.

    Thanks,

    gary

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    Gary Wilson
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    Northampton, MA
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  • Josh_10
    Josh_10 Member Posts: 787


    Hi Gary,

    I used a T-Drill on a really big job a while back. I was fitting mostly 4" Copper but I really feel the T-Drill saved me alot of time. Basically it flanges the pipe about 1/8" so you can braze in your stub.

    Can't say much for smaller pipe. I would think you would want to set yourself up with a good jig so your manifold is plumb. Also one thing to keep in mind is the pipe will become more flexible after brazing so I would support it well. But I am sure you know that.

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  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
    Definitely braze the drop stub.

    i owned a t drill wrench and drill style t drill a long time ago the hand wrench thing was pretty handy deal..the drill thing might work with the new 18 v slow rpm battery packs that are availamle these days....and there are some pinner pipe vices with a few twisty locks on them that actually hold on to the surface and pipe..

  • Christian Egli_2
    Christian Egli_2 Member Posts: 812
    Mr.T and the A team making holes

    Here is the link to Flowdrill, the Dutch company that has long been making hole bits to perforate steel and other metal with about the same line of thought as the T drill.

    Check out applications HVAC to see headers and such.

    Their method allows for tapping, which is neat, and it goes real fast.

    However the technique is not practical for on site operation with hand held tools. It really works, and boy does it work, on a drill press.

    http://flowdrill.com/english/introduction.htm

    An idea worthwhile sharing.

  • used in our lab area

    I had the plumbing program come in several years ago and they did the T-drill thing on a primary loop around our shop. We used both 1/2" and 3/4" off the 1 1/2" copper loop. Worked great. I know the instructions said you Must braze the joints. There just isn't enough surface for the capillary action and strength for a reliable joint using soft solder.

    And I know the plumbing shop has made up several "manifolds" using this tool.
  • Scott04
    Scott04 Member Posts: 69


    What is the cost of a T-drill? I just went to the web site, and I can see where this tool could be very useful.

    Scott
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,509
    You might want to...

    ... look into the REMS tools for pulling 'T's. For occasional use they have a nice kit for use with your drill. For brazing only.

    Yours, Larry
  • flange
    flange Member Posts: 153


    We first used a tee drill in the late eighties for a water source heatpump project. it was a high rise application, with roughly twenty units per floor. all joints do need to be brazed due to lack of getting a full cup. excellent time saving device once it was accepted. job is still fimne many years later.
  • hr
    hr Member Posts: 6,106
    no, you don't want to soft solder

    that joint. I like the JW Harris Blockade solder for that. A bit cooler melt temperature than sil-phos.

    I'd second the REMS if you do 1" and under sizes. Not quite as fancy as the T-Drill but less $$'s.

    Watch e-bay for used t-drills. And pawn shops :(

    hot rod

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  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,490
    T drill

    HR, is the price a secret? I can't seem to find the price online.

    Is there a jig that one could buy or does one make there own? I've never seen it done.

    Thanks, Gary

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    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
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  • hr
    hr Member Posts: 6,106
    take a look

    The REMS I have, Twist/ Hurrican, will pull tees and also create a fitting socket with a second attachment. Even on hard drawn tube.

    The T-Drill is a bit more engineered as the same head drills and pulls the tee, in one movement. It also has a hefty chain vice to secure the tool to the pipe. A must for the larger pull sized or overhead work.

    I built this simple unistrut stand to hold pipe to pull manifolds, etc. on the work bench.

    I've found it's cheaper, and neater, to buy premade manifolds, however.

    Watts radiant, PHP Precision Hydronic products, and Alberta t-Drill will build just about anything with copper.

    Earthlee.com makes great steel pipe manifolds and headers, by the way :)

    Either tool will easily pay for itself, sometimes on the first job. We bought the first T-Drill when we did copper fire protection systems, years ago.

    And yes, even 20 years ago they were weird about price. You had to get a rep to demo the tool for you before price was discussed. Hard to say no after a good live demo, on the job. You'll want to keep the tool the rep arrives with :)


    hot rod

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  • Jeff Elston
    Jeff Elston Member Posts: 289
    Price

    I priced one in Phillyabout a month ago it was around 5 grand

    But you should find a rep

    I really like there pipe cutter the super 8 looks nice


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  • Kniggit
    Kniggit Member Posts: 123
    Always braze

    I thnk after re visiting this thread enough times, I should state when I said emergency, the intent of the word would be that, if you had no other options and you needed to complete it in critical situation that could not be without service in the imidiate situation, and you could remove and replace the joint, either the next day sooner. Otherwise a nice brazed joint should last you the life of the pipe.

    Just to be perfectly clear NEVER use doft solder on a PERMANANT pulled tee.

    Sorry just needed to get that off my chest.
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