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Oil Tanks

I am in need of a replacement oil tank...Any thoughts on the Roth Double Wall Saftey Tank...???

Any thoughts would be most help...

Thanks

Comments

  • Ken D._2
    Ken D._2 Member Posts: 14
    Tank

    The Roth tank is a very well built unit. Galvanized shell with a poly inner lining. It will probably last a lifetime.
  • Al Letellier_9
    Al Letellier_9 Member Posts: 929
    Roth tanks

    Have three of the beauties in my home and they are great. In my humble opinion, the best of the other altenative safety tanks. Well worth the investment.

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  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,798
    How do Roth tanks avoid the water/sludge problems

    reputedly caused by top supply to burner instead of at bottom of tank? (supposedly bottom supply will allow general tank filter to remove water.)

    Thanks,

    David
  • Al Letellier_9
    Al Letellier_9 Member Posts: 929
    oil and sludge

    The solution is to use some sort of treatment in the oil to prevent the sludge build up in the first place and to get water in "suspension"with the oil. But with those really big openings in the top, it would be very easy to bet in there and suck out the sludge if it every became a problem.

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  • D107
    D107 Member Posts: 1,798
    Thanks Al. Seems like a built-in maintenance problem

    whereas with a bottom supply and two good filters you might never have a sludge problem to deal with. What other tanks can you recommend that have inert inside surfaces and bottom supply?

    David
  • Even with bottom feed steel tanks

    there is always , always a buildup of sludge over the years . Some are so bad we wind up leaving 30 gallons of primordial stew after a pump over . I've got less than 1/8 in my Roth tank . I'll see if I can take a pic of the inside .
  • Pics

    They aint too clear , but you can see there's no buildup on the sides . I'll take some more when it gets lower . I bought this Roth tank used , it must be 4 or 5 years old by now .
  • Pumping fuel over

    Ron said:

    “Even with bottom feed steel tanks there is always , always a buildup of sludge over the years . Some are so bad we wind up leaving 30 gallons of primordial stew after a pump over “.

    Ron, think about what you said. If there was 30 gallons left, how much did you accidentally send over to a new tank. Any is too much. A juice glass full would clog a normal residential filter.

    I am against EVER pumping any fuel over from an old tank to a new tank. When I still worked in the field (retired), I would run the existing tank down to near empty, then scrap what ever is left. The new tank would always get fresh new fuel.

    If the tank were a leaker, I would pump the fuel into drum(s) and feed the burner from the drums until the fuel was gone. I would then fill the new tank with fresh new fuel, and completely clean the fuel system on the heating unit, prior to start up.

    In addition, I very recently attended a NORA tank seminar taught by John Levey. NORA also teaches that you should not pump fuel from an oil tank to a new tank.

    JMHO

    Ed Carey
  • Pumping fuel over

    Ron said:

    “Even with bottom feed steel tanks there is always , always a buildup of sludge over the years . Some are so bad we wind up leaving 30 gallons of primordial stew after a pump over “.

    Ron, think about what you said. If there was 30 gallons left, how much did you accidentally send over to a new tank. Any is too much. A juice glass full would clog a normal residential filter.

    I am against EVER pumping any fuel over from an old tank to a new tank. When I still worked in the field (retired from the field work), I would run the existing tank down to near empty, then scrap what ever is left. The new tank would always get fresh new fuel.

    If the tank were a leaker, I would pump the fuel into drum(s) and feed the burner from the drums until the fuel was gone. I would then fill the new tank with fresh new fuel, and completely clean the fuel system on the heating unit, prior to start up.

    In addition, I very recently attended a NORA tank seminar taught by John Levey. NORA also teaches that you should not pump fuel from an oil tank to a new tank.

    JMHO

    Ed Carey
This discussion has been closed.