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Tell me why this is incorrect.

Al Corelli
Al Corelli Member Posts: 454
Got involved with finishing another contractor's boiler. (we both do installs for the same oil company)
Looking at the picture, I see the Hartford loop done in a way that screams "incorrect", but I'll leave it up to y'all to decide if it will work like this (no real time to do it over, but I will if you think it is bad.

The other contractor "always does it this way" and "never has problems".

My name will not go on this install (we're doing him a favor, cause he has family issues), but I do not want to create problems.

Thank you all for your insight and information.

Al Corelli

Comments

  • Brad White_117
    Brad White_117 Member Posts: 8
    Observations

    1) It is backwards (obviously). The return is "dropping off the equalizer" to the boiler rather than flowing up and into the equalizer and back to the boiler.

    What I see happening here is forcing your return and steam to dead-head against each other and one hopes still allow flow to leave by that close nipple. If run at higher pressures I see this as an issue with waterline instability. Just a gut check; I am sure Steamhead and others will make much more cogent observations.

    2) Equalizer is 1-1/4" size. I would make it 1-1/2" as Dan H(imself) has recommended.

    3) Check valve in the return on the floor? Necessary? Granted it looks "very existing" but I suspect that is more of a constriction than a help.

    My $0.02

    Brad
  • Robert O'Brien
    Robert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,537
    Would

    I do it that way? No,but I have seen it many times with no operational problems

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  • clammy
    clammy Member Posts: 3,094
    ain't right

    Sorry Al but in my book it's not right ,i really have never seen a hartford loop piped that way it sure looked eaiser the way he had it lined up and all but i would believe that it is not correct and if any issues did arise then they could be in trouble .I would myself repipe it ,it looks like a couple of nipples and a 90 and 45 and your good to go ,sorry but i stick to the manafactures piping diagrams and i,ve never seen that before.Has it been steamed yet ?,peace and good luck clammy
    R.A. Calmbacher L.L.C. HVAC
    NJ Master HVAC Lic.
    Mahwah, NJ
    Specializing in steam and hydronic heating
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
    no frills job

    not piped traditionally or professionally but could probably work. relief valve missing on cold water supply to coil. no tempering valve or shut off control valve. no draw off to drain domestic system. neat work lacking key items.
  • Funny thing

    We piped one that way not too long ago . It just worked out that way . Worked well .

    Before everyone jumps on the bandwagon of thinking it ain't right , I'd like to know why ? If the whole thing is below the water line , how does the this setup effect anything ?
  • Al Corelli_2
    Al Corelli_2 Member Posts: 395
    Spartan Job

    I look at the boiler job and it is no wonder the other contractor makes more money than us.

    It has not steamed yet.

    All of the questioned coil devices are in another part of the piping.

    It is a VERY small system running at vapor pressures. I'll wait for more responses and the yay or nay will vote the repipe in or out.

    On "spartan" boiler swap-outs, ONLY the boiler is changed. This one necessitated building a header as the previous boiler (I saw pictures) had no header ,equalizer or Hartford loop.

    Thanks for your continued assistance,
    Al Corelli
    Al Corelli, NY



    914-804-2234
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,078
    as long as the top of the ''hartford''

    is actually below the waterline it will work just fine..my only concern would be if the water was at the LOWEST point of operation, do you hear strange gurgling noises as the header drains back into the water attempting to rise up..it will still work mind you..i know three ways to do a false waterline and all work..but only one way is ever taught..me thinks this is the same..i think it would only potentially be noisy.

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  • Brad White_117
    Brad White_117 Member Posts: 8
    That is what I was trying to articulate, Gerry

    the notion of downcoming major condensate and residual steam meeting upcoming condensate, bullheading and taking a left to the boiler. All of the return would have to go head to head and a hard turn rather than flowing more smoothly into the equalizer. I think we are thinking on the same plane here. I do agree if at vapor pressures as stated it is not likely to be a violent event with stacking in the equalizer.
  • gerry gill
    gerry gill Member Posts: 3,078
    yup, were thinking alike..

    scary isn't it..you described it well..

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  • Al, these guys are right

    it might work OK but why take the chance? I'd say repipe it "to manufacturers specs", without the check valve.

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This discussion has been closed.