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J.L. Mott

gerry gill
gerry gill Member Posts: 3,078
and you saved it..you da man...
gwgillplumbingandheating.com
Serving Cleveland's eastern suburbs from Cleveland Heights down to Cuyahoga Falls.

Comments

  • Jim Bennett
    Jim Bennett Member Posts: 607
    J.L. Mott

    This was interesting today. I worked on a J.L. Mott Sanitary Screw connection water closet. There have been discussions here on J.L. Mott, and I suspected this was one.

    Today there was something in the trapway that the auger could not grab, so I had to remove the closet. If it had not been for the "Wall", I would have had no idea how this was set, and a hammer would have been the tool of choice.

    Removed the flush valve and grabbed hold and gave a twist and IT SCREWED RIGHT OFF! (righty tighty, lefty loosey) Turns out to be 90 years old! The threads on the male and female connection were pristine! What a great design! How many other plumbing connections can be reused after 90 years, much less 20!

    Here's a few pics in case I'm not the only one to have never seen one of these.
    Jim Bennett
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,734
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
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  • Sweet_2
    Sweet_2 Member Posts: 143
    I second that !!

    WOW, Thanks for sharing that. Glad you didn't reach for the hammer.
  • Jim Bennett
    Jim Bennett Member Posts: 607
    wax seal

    It does seem to be a better connection. Too bad other manufacturers didn't pick up on it.

    My first thought was how you installed the floor connection so the closet was facing the right direction when tight.

    Here's another cool pic, the building in the back, behind the telephone pole is where this closet is located. I think the picture shows the construction of a subway tunnel so that would make it around the early '20s.

    Jim
    Jim Bennett
  • jackchips_2
    jackchips_2 Member Posts: 1,338
    Hi Jim,

    Those are great pictures and look just like the ones I took out of our 100 year old Library back in the 80's. They did not have any markings at all but were similar to yours.

    When I pulled the two out I did destroy one just to figure how to remove it but I think the other one ended up in the Manoog Museaum in Worcester, Ma. I had that same thought you just shared about how it ended up facing forward. We can still learn so much from the old time mechanics.

    One thing about the ones I pulled was they were gravity flush valves with a feed from a tank in the the attic. How were these fed?

    Great find and thanks for sharing.

    Jack
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,744
    We'll see if today's so-called last-forever technologies

    will be that durable 90 years out! I love when I see them. I beilieve they were in Paterson N.J. or lower Manhattan, J.L. Mott Mad Dog

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  • Dave L_2
    Dave L_2 Member Posts: 15
    J L Mott ...

    > will be that durable 90 years out! I love when I

    > see them. I beilieve they were in Paterson N.J.

    > or lower Manhattan, J.L. Mott Mad Dog

    >

    > _A

    > HREF="http://www.heatinghelp.com/getListed.cfm?id=

    > 210&Step=30"_To Learn More About This

    > Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in

    > "Find A Professional"_/A_



    Was in lower Manhattan. I removed a 100 yr old " Sitze " soaking tub with the faucet and standing waste that was made by J L Mott. The tub and hardware were in GREAT shape. The tub was donated to the Manoog Plumbing Museum in Mass.

  • Dave L_2
    Dave L_2 Member Posts: 15
    J L Mott ...

    Was in lower Manhattan. I removed a 100 yr old " Sitze " soaking tub with the faucet and standing waste that was made by J L Mott. The tub and hardware were in GREAT shape. The tub was donated to the Manoog Plumbing Museum in Mass.

    Dave
  • Jim Bennett
    Jim Bennett Member Posts: 607
    Not sure Jack,

    how these were originally fed. Now they are on the domestic water service with Sloan valves. Whatever was there must have been lower and closer to the bowl. I suspect this as there is a small metal stanchon on the wall with a rubber bumper on the end, similar to a door stop. (you can see it in the last photo) Looks like it was there for the seat to rest against when up. Now the seat rests on the flush valve.

    Did the ones you removed have some sort of flush valve?

    Jim
    Jim Bennett
  • Scott Denny
    Scott Denny Member Posts: 124
    J.L.Mott

    They were at 84 to 90 Beekman St. I have a framed advertisement for their products cut out from a magazine from the turn of the century.
  • jackchips_2
    jackchips_2 Member Posts: 1,338
    They did

    have flush valves that worked under very low pressure fed from a gravity tank in the attic but that is all I recall. Too many years have gone by.

    If I could impart one bit of advice, other than dealing with the actual installations, to P & H mechanics starting today is to preserve our history. Boy how I wish I had some of the items demolished during renovations in the 70's and 80's.

    Jack
  • Sweet_2
    Sweet_2 Member Posts: 143
    Good advice Jackchips

    Theres so many good practices going by the waste side in the name of technology. Not to mention the work ethic of the Dead men. I for one miss the craft of leading joints, came in on the tail end and am glad I had the opportinity to do some. Theres so much the younger ones could benefit from knowing, The Dead men served this trade well.
This discussion has been closed.