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T-Former VA rating check???

Volt's X amps = VA rating........I just had a brain stumble and forgot the basics.

Mike T.

Comments

  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    VA rating for 24 vac t-former.

    Need to know the formula to arrive at required VA rating required. Example: 3 HW zone valves rated at .8 amps each =2.4 amps....so 24 vac divided by 2.4 amps equals VA???? of current set up or load. Right or wrong?

    Mike T.
  • Paul Rohrs_4
    Paul Rohrs_4 Member Posts: 466
    Transformers

    a (120V AC)40VA transformer which supplies 24V. 40VA ÷ 24V = 1.66 usable amps available.

    a (120V AC)50VA transformer which supplies 24V. 50VA ÷ 24V = 2.083 usable amp available.

    Regards,

    PR

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  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Thanks Paul

    That makes sense......If you take your 1.66 ampsx 24 vac that equals 39.84 va on the rating of the t-former...;-)

    Mike T.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 11,150


    Not only do you add up the va ratings but it is a good idea to add some margin for safety. Depending on the type of load there is current inrush involved.

    The other factor is wire size especially with low voltage wiring. watch your voltage drop.


    ED
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    T-Former

    When figuring the VA rating ,does power factor get added into the formula? V x A x P.F.=watts.? And the VA rating is the same thing as watts.
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    Techman, ...

    I think PF is used in current drawing loads such as motors usually 115vac and higher. from this watts is determined and overall efficiency on the load is determined. Did you purchase that "Ugly's Electrical Reff."??? Great book and it's in there.

    See Ya.

    Mike T.
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    Xformer

    Mike T. I did and I didn't.I did purchase "Ugly's" but, I didn't read all of it. I'm heading out to the truck right now to go get some reading material-Ugly's. Thank's!
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    X -Former

    O.K. I read Ugly's .The formula IS the formula! So, is power factor more limited to industrial applications? How does P-F affect my units in the 7 1/2 - 50 HP range and smaller commercial / residential units up to 5 HP ? How would I recogonize a problem ? 4 questions, 4 thanks!
  • jim lockard
    jim lockard Member Posts: 1,059
    loads

    I was thinking that power factor comes into play with inductive loads such as transformers, and motors. Resistance loads such as electric heat would not apply.
    As to how the power factor would apply to a small control Xformer is of no value. Power factor in regards to a 3 phase motor could raise to cost of operation for that motor. A .80 PF on a 3 phase motor that draws 30 amps and a .95 PF on a 3 phase motor that draws 30 amps the .80 PF motor will cost more to run. Why ? because you have two kinds of power real power(IxE=W) which is what the amp meter sees and apparent power (PF) which is what creates the magnetic field/inductive power. Hope this helps.
    Been a long time how did I do. Best Wishes J.Lockard
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    T-former

    Morning!Hi Jim, sounds all right to me! ,so I'll say you did good.But somewhere along the line a bigger t-former is used to get power into our customers buildings. The control T-former's secondary load is almost exclusivly used on resistive loads and being small (75va and lower), I can see the P-F effects being negligable.. I also understand the monitory savings.
    One of my refrigeration customers has 4 -5hp3ph units ,4-3hp3ph,and several smaller 1ph units.Should I even care about power factor? How do I recogonize low p-f? Thanks again!(See what you started Mike T.!)(Enjoy!)
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    SMiles all around.....;-)

    The power factor is fixed on a given load. If you were to look in the parts book to replace one of them motors you will find that there are a few selections to choose from. some cost more.....Why? I think if you look at the motor specs some of them are rated more efficient than others, less run cost, more for motor. Check out pg. 13 in the Ugly's Hand book. If you plug in the #'s of your motor, you can get the Idea.

    Mike T.

    PS: I know Techman,...Look what I started.:-) The last thing I want to do on Football Sunday is try and reassure myself...;-)

    Also, just an additional point if you look on further to pg 14, 15 and so on the power factor, HP, and the eff% of the inductive load is set and constant. As a result the #'s may change due to a low voltage situation or a change in amps due to electrical problems or say a plugged filter. Amps in this case will go down and that changes the overall formula, but the said above is still the same. I hope that makes sense. If you need it I can scan the pages for you.

    Mike T.
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    ???????

    Mike T. I think your computor needs a new "spellcheck". The proper spelling is NASCAR Sunday!
  • Empire_2
    Empire_2 Member Posts: 2,343
    ;-) I like That to.

    I switch back and forth.

    Mike T.
  • Rollie Peck
    Rollie Peck Member Posts: 47


    Just a safety/legal reminder - split loads greater than the
    capacity of one 40 VA transformer among two or more
    transformers rather than use a higher capacity transformer.
    40 VA transformers are designed especially to limit their
    output current so as not to overheat the small wire used on
    thermostats and controls in case of short circuts.

    Rollie Peck
  • carol_3
    carol_3 Member Posts: 397


    Here's another reason to stick with smaller transformers, besides. If you have a number of zones and you're using multiple transformers, if one burns out, you have the rest left to keep part of the building going.
  • Techman
    Techman Member Posts: 2,144
    Burning T- form

    In a R.T. ( Lennox? or York?),on the 75va Tform there was a warning sign cautioning against shorting the secondary. Sure enough,the wind blew my jumper wire (hot)against the cabinet.Then 30-45 seconds later,poof, smoke came out, goo came out ,a couple of swear words also came out ,then down to the truck and out came a new T-former. Enjoy your day!
  • carol_3
    carol_3 Member Posts: 397


    Ah, yes,letting the smoke out kills them every time, doesn't it. :)
This discussion has been closed.