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Recessed Sunrad radiator pitch

Ross S
Ross S Member Posts: 3
Anthony,
2 1/2" Supply Main diameter, 1 1/4" or 1 1/2" individual pipe diameters to radiators (most have larger diameter). The rad with the gushing water release at the end of each cycle has the 1 1/2" (larger) diameter pipe. I didn't get a chance yet to check the air vent for proper size, nor even try to clean it, but I will. There is a small section of this pipe thats bare in the basement, just as it breaks off the main supply. I will wrap it up asap. Thanks for the interest and ideas. Ross

Comments

  • Ross S
    Ross S Member Posts: 3
    Big problem with little Sunrad unit

    Hello,
    I have this small Sunrad unit recessed in my bathroom wall. (See attachment of particular model)
    It is 20" high x 7 sections. I have been hearing extremely loud water hammering (when steam starts radiating through it) and constant water gurgling during the entire heat cycle. When I put a level across the top, I noticed that the unit was pitched 3/8" in the wrong direction! Is it correct to pitch THIS unit the same way as a typical free-standing unit? Establishing the correct pitch would entail removing ceramic tile that abuts up against the unit. I realize that care must be taken not to pitch it too much. The system is one-pipe steam. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks, Ross
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    It needs to be pitched

    1/4" per 2-1/2' of length, back toward the supply valve. Use checkers.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Ross S
    Ross S Member Posts: 3
    Thank you and one more question

    Thank you Dan for the fast reply, I will get right on it. One other strange thing happens during the heating cycle...actually right at the end. I hear a gush of water always coming from another radiator (free standing...wide unit on 2nd floor) down its pipe to the return pipe as if vacuum pressure was holding it until you hear the final push of air coming out of its air vent. It is at that point this water (seems to be an exact duration of time and water) rushes down and then all is well. Pitch is fine and there is no water hammering...just the gush of condensate. Just wondering if you or any one else reading has an opinion. Your book "We got Steam Heat" is great. I will be buying others I'm sure in the future. I insulated all the exposed pipes in the basement (most of them were naked!) I sense that the upright pipes in the outer walls going up to the second floor rads are suffering from poorly insulated bays. Plaster walls are not friendly when you try to break into them to re-insulate. At least the basement runs are now tucked in tightly. I'm going to contribute a "brick to the wall" so this great site can keep heating :) Thanks again, Ross
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    I appreciate that.

    Thanks.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Anthony Menafro
    Anthony Menafro Member Posts: 197
    Supply piping

    What size and type of piping is supplying these rads.? If your piping is too small, the steam and condensate can't pass one another. Also make sure that the air vents aren't too large on these rads. causing the rads. to flood and the steam holding the water in them until after the system shuts down.Hope all works out for you.

    Anthony Menafro
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