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Propane BTU calculation?

There are approx. 91,000 BTU's available in a gallon of propane, so multiply 2.4 x 91K and you get 218,400 BTU....at 100% efficiency.....multiply that by the efficiency rating of the unit to get approx. BTU consumption.

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Comments

  • Jamie_6
    Jamie_6 Member Posts: 710
    Propane

    How do I convert the following information into BTU's?

    88 cubic foot per hour / 2.4 gallons per hour Propane.

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  • Al Letellier_9
    Al Letellier_9 Member Posts: 929


    > How do I convert the following information into

    > BTU's?

    >

    > 88 cubic foot per hour / 2.4 gallons

    > per hour Propane.

    >

    > _A

    > HREF="http://www.heatinghelp.com/getListed.cfm?id=

    > 289&Step=30"_To Learn More About This

    > Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in

    > "Find A Professional"_/A_





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  • Constantin
    Constantin Member Posts: 3,782
    Isn't Propane 91.6kBTU/Gallon?

    ... so looks like 220kBTU/hr...

    EDIT: Looks like Al beat me to the answer! :-P

    Ah, the joys of a laggy internet connection and tabbed threads...
  • Dick Charland
    Dick Charland Member Posts: 178
    Could be

    Constantin, but who knows for sure that it is to spec. We figure #2 oil at 142,000, but that may not always be the case.
  • S Ebels
    S Ebels Member Posts: 2,322
    Supposedly it is........

    There is however, variation in blends that yield different btu/gallon numbers. I was told by a large local propane company to use 90,000 to be safe. They sell over 6,000,000 gallons per year so I assume they know whereof they speak.
  • Bob Harper
    Bob Harper Member Posts: 864
    BTU values

    The stated BTU values are a function of the vapor density/ specific gravity. The heavier the fuel, the higher the BTU rating. Same with NG. Depending upon where you live. Around Philly, PECO says use 1050 BTU/ Cu ft. That, however does not take into account "spiking" during high demand periods where they toss in whatever is lying around on the back shelf---butane, ethane, iso-ethyl whazzamattathane. You name it. Of course, they'll deny it or play it down but just wait until the LNG flows. Get out your Wobbe Index numbers!

    Timmy? Ed?
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