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Trinity boiler help

Dan_16
Dan_16 Member Posts: 11
I bought and installed a new T200 boiler from NY Thermal in Canada. The first one had a leak in the heat exchanger and was replaced under warranty. The 2nd one ran for 2 weeks and the sentry 2100 module went bad. Now after another 3 weeks of running fine ,the boiler bangs and vibrates at initial ignition but then smooths out and operates great. I can't see me having a gas pressure problem because it runs fine after the fact and my Rinnai hot water heater run well also. When it does misbehave I can see the flame shuttering before it clears up. I'm thinking air/fuel mix problem but nothing has changed so why have problems now? House is cold and I'm frusterated, need help fast.

Comments

  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 763


    Gas pressure is critical. You must test before and during the firing cycle. Must never drop below 7". Combustion analysis is necessary. At 5000 ft. I have to adjust every one that I have installed. Temp. and humidity can affect the air/fuel mixture. Some units have ran great for months until the weather changes. Then I have had the puffing/shuttering problems. Call Cliff Taite with NTI, 514 668 6464 or the tech support at the factory 800 668 2575.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • Ken_8
    Ken_8 Member Posts: 1,640
    Thank you.

    Got your call. I left a message on your phone.
    I am puzzled however. Why isn't the installing contractor taking care of this?

    I will be there for you as needed.

    Ken

    To Learn More About This Professional, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Professional"
  • Dan_16
    Dan_16 Member Posts: 11
    Thanx

    I found you were 100% right Dave, pressure was 11" standing and plummited to 4 when firing hard. I had ran 1/2 pipe but am going to redo and increase this. Possibly may have to add a seperate regulator. Appreciate the help.
  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 763


    Sounds like you may be using LP gas. Check the manual for max. and min. gas pressures.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • Greg Swob
    Greg Swob Member Posts: 167


    Dave-

    Hope you enjoyed the training session at HVAC Supply as much I did. They speak highly of you and after seeing some pics of your installs, I see why. Also, thanks for the tips on the condensate neutralizing apparutus. Greg
  • Dan_16
    Dan_16 Member Posts: 11


    Found out that my gas meter was bad and screwing around with my pressures. They canged the meter and regulator and at least have fairly constant flow. I can't keep the pressure as high as 7" all the time though like you recommend cause I just don't have it at the street. The shuttering is greatly reduced but there is still a small one. All of my readings are in thier parameters except for the manifold pressure. They say it should be 0.00" when running and I have between .05-.10". It's small but I can't get it exact and am thinking thats where my slight shutter if from. I also don't have an analyzer.
  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 763


    Are you using natural gas? It should drop only about 1" at full fire. Without a combustion analyzer you are flying blind. These boilers were set up a sea level and with a Btu content of of about 1030 per cubic ft. I install these at 5000 to 8000 ft. with a Btu content of about 830. Once I have them set up they purrr like a kitten. I too had a couple of problems with bad boards. They seem to have the bugs worked out.

    Find the input screw. Turn it one turn counter clock wise. If that does not help, go back to the original postion and turn clockwise one turn. If no go, you need an analyzer.

    Do you have the 1.5 Sentry board? Look on page 25 of your manual. Set your highest gas input value from 205 to about 160. Then set the starting gas input to 45. This may smooth things out until you get help.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • Dave just curious as to why

    you would have a 1" drop when firing. Most gas systems should be set up for no pressure drop at full fire. There are allowable drops but those are listed so that pressures and pipe sizing will be set accordingly. Is this something that these units typically do?
  • Steve Miller
    Steve Miller Member Posts: 115
    Trinity's

    > I bought and installed a new T200 boiler from NY

    > Thermal in Canada. The first one had a leak in

    > the heat exchanger and was replaced under

    > warranty. The 2nd one ran for 2 weeks and the

    > sentry 2100 module went bad. Now after another 3

    > weeks of running fine ,the boiler bangs and

    > vibrates at initial ignition but then smooths out

    > and operates great. I can't see me having a gas

    > pressure problem because it runs fine after the

    > fact and my Rinnai hot water heater run well

    > also. When it does misbehave I can see the flame

    > shuttering before it clears up. I'm thinking

    > air/fuel mix problem but nothing has changed so

    > why have problems now? House is cold and I'm

    > frusterated, need help fast.



  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 763


    Tim, I was refering to the pressure drop on the gas line. When sizing fuel lines, I always thought there should be no more that 1/2" to 1" pressure drop when all the gas appliances were fired. I use Gas Tite's program to size my gas lines and it asks you what the pressure is and what the pressure drop is that you want. At medium pressure we can see up to a 6" pressure drop. For low pressure I use 7" with a 1" drop to size the lines.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • Good that is a factor

    that is built in to those charts so that there will not actually be a drop. I just wanted to make it clear so everyone understands that there should not actually be a drop in pressure ever. If there is something is wrong.
  • Dave Stroman
    Dave Stroman Member Posts: 763


    Tim, Am I missing something here. When I put my pressure gauge on the inlet of a gas valve, I always see some drop in pressure when the burner fires. 1" is not unusual.

    Dave in Denver
    Dave Stroman
  • Dave and others

    a properly sized outlet with good pressure from the utility or LP gas provider should show no drop in pressure from point of delivery to the end user piece of equipment. The idea is to have the same pressure at all points of use in the system with no drop at all. You may get a small drop at start up but it should come right back to a steady pressure as determined by settings from the utility or LP gas provider. For residentail systems with a house regulator (high pressure systems) are usually set to 6" to 7" W.C. For inner city low pressure systems pressure may vary from 7" W.C. to 10" W.C. from the mains into the customers home. With the exception of extreme weather conditions or high demand pressure should remain steady at all times between those points of 7 to 10. For LP gas 10" to 11" is the norm from your second stage regualtor also with no drop when equipment is firing.
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