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What heating source to choose?

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Tony_14
Tony_14 Member Posts: 3
I am contractor in the process of renovating a home. I have added a new 2nd floor and are renovating the existing 1st floor. The current heating system consists of a new Burnham Series 2 hot water system boiler, the first floor had old aluminum fin convector radiators. These radiators were place under windows on the first floor and removed as a result of windows being closed or a kitchen sink being moved to under the window.
The first floor is appox 1160 sq feet which is all wide open.
2nd fllor is 3 bedrooms & bath approx 740 sq feet.
I would like to replace the the radiators with someting other than baseboard because I would like room for furniture etc.
I am looking at different types of radiators (cast iron base boards, cast iron convectors, etc)
Also, I am hearing people tell me about adding a hydro coil through my AC unit, but am skeptical due to dray air and having a son with asthma.
What would be the best radiator/system to install into this home?
I have room under windows. I want something that is easy to clean and dust free.

Your thoughts?

I apprciate any help.

Thanks,

Tony

Comments

  • Tony_14
    Tony_14 Member Posts: 3
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    Deciding what type of radiators or heat to use.

    I am contractor in the process of renovating a home. I have added a new 2nd floor and are renovating the existing 1st floor. The current heating system consists of a new Burnham Series 2 hot water system boiler, the first floor had old aluminum fin convector radiators. These radiators were place under windows on the first floor and removed as a result of windows being closed or a kitchen sink being moved to under the window.
    The first floor is appox 1160 sq feet which is all wide open.
    2nd fllor is 3 bedrooms & bath approx 740 sq feet.
    I would like to replace the the radiators with someting other than baseboard because I would like room for furniture etc.
    I am looking at different types of radiators (cast iron base boards, cast iron convectors, etc)
    Also, I am hearing people tell me about adding a hydro coil through my AC unit, but am skeptical due to dray air and having a son with asthma.
    What would be the best radiator/system to install into this home?
    I have room under windows. I want something that is easy to clean and dust free.

    Your thoughts?

    I apprciate any help.

    Thanks,

    Tony



  • Weezbo
    Weezbo Member Posts: 6,232
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    Buderas pannels.........

    they look good. however...i know nothing of the system you have previously installed ,from my minds eye it seems you might be able to spin in some other options also at this time...instead of hydro air if your son has difficulties breathing an HRV might improve the IAQ,losing the carpet and going for floating floors in lino or a wood finish is easier to keep clean and might also help...new venitan blinds look sharp and unlike drapes and curtains further help ...u.v. is sorta pricy however they done right seem to aid in sick building syndrome..really there is another thing my frien swears by it is similar to a giant ionic breeze unit...however i really dont know you could find some info along those lines too though. might not detract from IAQ.
  • BillW@honeywell
    BillW@honeywell Member Posts: 1,099
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    Check out the following...

    For American products, Burnham makes panel radiators and cast iron baseboard and SlantFin makes a wide variety of baseboard products, and there are many more manufacturers, too. European manufacturers include Buderus and Runtal, among others. There's quite a range of designs and prices, ranging from utilitarian to artwork. Many of the panel radiators are available in just about any color. Heated towelracks for the bath are available as well.

    Check out the homeshows, your professional plumbing supply house, the 'Net or the "Find a Contractor" feature above. With hydronics, you never have to settle for the ordinary.

    On the IAQ front, besides the other suggestions already stated, one of the best favors you can do for asthmatic or highly allergic patients is to install a central vacuum cleaning system. They exhaust outdoors, and so don't blow small particles right back out the rear of the vac into the air again!. If this is new construction, they're straightforward to install, but retrofits can get tricky. If you go hydroair and/or AC, consider an electronic air cleaner, or a whole-house hepa filter system, humidification and UV germ inhibiting lights.
  • Tony_14
    Tony_14 Member Posts: 3
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    Bill,

    In your opinion what would be better. Hydro thru the AC or radiators/baseboards?
  • BillW@honeywell
    BillW@honeywell Member Posts: 1,099
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    It all boils down...

    to budget and lots of other factors, but if I were doing it, and in-floor radiant heat was not a possibility, I'd go with the cast iron baseboards or panel radiators, with a seperate air conditioning system. I would use either hepa or electronic air cleaners on the air conditioning, since pollen related allergies are exaggerated in the hot months.

    In winter, the baseboards don't stir up dust and dander and other allergens like a forced air system will. You also can have much tighter control on the temperatures with an hydronic system, since you can have outside temperature reset, "cruise control for your house", that varies the water temperatures to your heat emitters based on the outside air temp.

    Normal cooking and bathing may add enough humidity to an hydronic heated home for comfort, but hardwood floors, woodwork and people with allergies may not get enough humidity, and you may need a humidifier. A steam unit is best for this, since you don't need heat to produce the humidification, the unit is self contained, and the humidified air will be delivered by your AC ductwork. A small hydronic coil to temper the air from the AC system in the winter is a good idea if you plan to do this.

    Remember this...your house is a system, made up of interdependent sub-systems, and the failure of any of them effects them all. The best boiler and heat delivery system won't make up for poor insulation, leaky windows, or sloppy load calculations. You want to maximize comfort without wasting expensive fuel. You want adequate hot water for bathing and laundry. You want a system that meets your other needs, like minimizing allergies and is quiet and unobtrusive, but complments your wife's decorating.

    Sorry about the long answer. There are a lot of factors that go into this decision, so take the best from The Wall and other websites, talk to contractors and friends, make as informed a decision as you can, since this system will be a major factor in your life for many years. After all, energy costs are the third largest expense for homeownership after taxes and mortgage, but are relatively easy to control. Check out www.honeywell.com/yourhome for info on air cleaners, thermostats, humidifiers and UV.
  • DaveGateway
    DaveGateway Member Posts: 568
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    Only problem with hydro-air

    is that placing vents for optimal AC (ceiling, cold air drops) is lousy for heating which is better with floor and lower wall vents. As Bill said, the best heat would radiant: flooring or panel rads. Setting up an additional mini hydro-air system, for humidity and air purification from your AC system in winter would be a great bonus. Steam humidifiers are expensine and need maintenanace, so the addition of hydro-coil to the AC ducts to get a standard humidifier to work is simpler. The only issue is if the air handler is in the attic, it's not recommended to put a water line for a humidifer up there, only closet and basement air handler installs.
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