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Radiant Steam

Ken_8
Ken_8 Member Posts: 1,640
We would like your opinion on the following situation....
A very substantial 100-year old house has a one-pipe steam system. To accomodate the all new "ultra" kitchen layout, the contractor ripped out the existing rad(s) in this large area and all that's left is a 3'X 8' horizontally hung rad under the kitchen floor - actually hanging from the basement ceiling directly under the center of the kitchen floor.

The kitchen floor is 8" thick concrete with an inch or so of mud on top - with embedded tight-weaved brick/tile surface. Quarter-sawn oak cabinetry and ultra-primo top-of-the-line showcase appliances.

The kitchen is cold. The 3 X 8 foot horizontal basement ceiling hung rad has a potential output of somtheing like 84 S.F. EDR.

The rad is turned off. We know by turning it on, we will get both radiant and convected heat into the 9-inch thick floor slab directly overhead.

You guessed it. We will turn on the rad, see what happens after a few days - and measure the upper surface temp to see what we can get woithout anything else than simply turning he rad back on. We suspect the slab will get a few degrees warmer - given enough time.

However, we suspect we could substantially enhance the underfloor rad's perfomance in heating the slab by eliminating the insulating nature of the 2-3" void between the rad's top face and the underfloor/slab.

Our thoughts were to place some wire mesh on the top of the already horizontal rad, pack the 2-3" void with cementatious material (concrete, mortar, etc.) and thereby induce conducted and radiant heating into the slab underfloor.

Any other ideas out there?

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Comments

  • Ken_8
    Ken_8 Member Posts: 1,640
    Radiant Steam

    We would like your opinion on the following situation....
    A very substantial 100-year old house has a one-pipe steam system. To accomodate the all new "ultra" kitchen layout, the contractor ripped out the existing rad(s) in this large area and all that's left is a 3'X 8' horizontally hung rad under the kitchen floor - actually hanging from the basement ceiling - directly under the center of the kitchen floor.

    The kitchen floor is 8" thick concrete with an inch or so of mud on top - with embedded tight-weaved brick/tile surface. Quarter-sawn oak cabinetry and ultra-primo top-of-the-line showcase appliances abound.

    The kitchen is cold. The 3 X 8 foot horizontal basement ceiling hung rad has a potential output of somtheing like 84 S.F. EDR.

    The rad is turned off. We know by turning it on, we will get both radiant and convected heat into the 9-inch thick floor slab directly overhead.

    You guessed it. We will turn on the rad, see what happens after a few days - and measure the upper surface temp to see what we can get without anything else than simply turning he rad back on. We suspect the slab will get a few degrees warmer - given enough time.

    However, we suspect we could substantially enhance the underfloor rad's perfomance in heating the slab by eliminating the insulating nature of the 2-3" void between the rad's top face and the underfloor/slab.

    Our thoughts were to place some wire mesh on the top of the already horizontal rad, pack the 2-3" void with cementatious material (concrete, mortar, etc.) and thereby induce conducted and radiant heating into the slab underfloor.

    Whaddaya think?

    To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"
  • I like that.

    > We would like your opinion on the following

    > situation.... A very substantial 100-year old

    > house has a one-pipe steam system. To accomodate

    > the all new "ultra" kitchen layout, the

    > contractor ripped out the existing rad(s) in this

    > large area and all that's left is a 3'X 8'

    > horizontally hung rad under the kitchen floor -

    > actually hanging from the basement ceiling -

    > directly under the center of the kitchen

    > floor.

    >

    > The kitchen floor is 8" thick concrete

    > with an inch or so of mud on top - with embedded

    > tight-weaved brick/tile surface. Quarter-sawn

    > oak cabinetry and ultra-primo top-of-the-line

    > showcase appliances abound.

    >

    > The kitchen is

    > cold. The 3 X 8 foot horizontal basement ceiling

    > hung rad has a potential output of somtheing like

    > 84 S.F. EDR.

    >

    > The rad is turned off. We know

    > by turning it on, we will get both radiant and

    > convected heat into the 9-inch thick floor slab

    > directly overhead.

    >

    > You guessed it. We will

    > turn on the rad, see what happens after a few

    > days - and measure the upper surface temp to see

    > what we can get without anything else than simply

    > turning he rad back on. We suspect the slab will

    > get a few degrees warmer - given enough

    > time.

    >

    > However, we suspect we could

    > substantially enhance the underfloor rad's

    > perfomance in heating the slab by eliminating the

    > insulating nature of the 2-3" void between the

    > rad's top face and the underfloor/slab.

    >

    > Our

    > thoughts were to place some wire mesh on the top

    > of the already horizontal rad, pack the 2-3" void

    > with cementatious material (concrete, mortar,

    > etc.) and thereby induce conducted and radiant

    > heating into the slab underfloor.

    >

    > Whaddaya

    > think?

    >

    > _A

    > HREF="http://www.heatinghelp.com/getListed.cfm?id=

    > 68&Step=30"_To Learn More About This Contractor,

    > Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A

    > Contractor"_/A_



  • I like that.

    > We would like your opinion on the following

    > situation.... A very substantial 100-year old

    > house has a one-pipe steam system. To accomodate

    > the all new "ultra" kitchen layout, the

    > contractor ripped out the existing rad(s) in this

    > large area and all that's left is a 3'X 8'

    > horizontally hung rad under the kitchen floor -

    > actually hanging from the basement ceiling -

    > directly under the center of the kitchen

    > floor.

    >

    > The kitchen floor is 8" thick concrete

    > with an inch or so of mud on top - with embedded

    > tight-weaved brick/tile surface. Quarter-sawn

    > oak cabinetry and ultra-primo top-of-the-line

    > showcase appliances abound.

    >

    > The kitchen is

    > cold. The 3 X 8 foot horizontal basement ceiling

    > hung rad has a potential output of somtheing like

    > 84 S.F. EDR.

    >

    > The rad is turned off. We know

    > by turning it on, we will get both radiant and

    > convected heat into the 9-inch thick floor slab

    > directly overhead.

    >

    > You guessed it. We will

    > turn on the rad, see what happens after a few

    > days - and measure the upper surface temp to see

    > what we can get without anything else than simply

    > turning he rad back on. We suspect the slab will

    > get a few degrees warmer - given enough

    > time.

    >

    > However, we suspect we could

    > substantially enhance the underfloor rad's

    > perfomance in heating the slab by eliminating the

    > insulating nature of the 2-3" void between the

    > rad's top face and the underfloor/slab.

    >

    > Our

    > thoughts were to place some wire mesh on the top

    > of the already horizontal rad, pack the 2-3" void

    > with cementatious material (concrete, mortar,

    > etc.) and thereby induce conducted and radiant

    > heating into the slab underfloor.

    >

    > Whaddaya

    > think?

    >

    > _A

    > HREF="http://www.heatinghelp.com/getListed.cfm?id=

    > 68&Step=30"_To Learn More About This Contractor,

    > Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A

    > Contractor"_/A_



  • I like that.

    What's the plan if it works too well?

    Maybe a remote bulb TRV on the vent line?

    I think it's going to condense a lot more than it used to, the supply might get overwhelmed with return water.

    I think it's a great idea, in view of the options. I know where two of these are in a basement, heating an outside patio above, as snowmelt. It works well, from what I saw.

    Noel

    P.S. Aren't we due for another trip out to Kennybobscottport, soon?
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,736
    That might work

    but if it doesn't, some of those ultra-modern steam radiators might be the answer.

    To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
This discussion has been closed.