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look at this near boiler piping

Fred P
Fred P Member Posts: 77
this boiler doesnt look piped right. I may be wrong, but is the equalizer supposed to be below the side tapping (is there even an equalizer on here??) and is the hartford loop a little on the small side??

I noticed there is drain tapping off the return pipe, thats a good idea.

This is a 1 pipe system in my neighbors house.. just wondering what you guys think of the way it was piped out.

It was piped from only 1 tapping and goes straight up into a 90 elbow...

Comments

  • isn't it amazing...

    forrest gump would say, ugly is as ugly does...
  • Fred P
    Fred P Member Posts: 77
    i guess that means

    you dont like the way this looks.. but is it acceptable?? would it meet "code" so to speak...

    I dont like the way it looks either, but Im not in the business... but Im learning!
  • not even close, Jim

    Show me a header with an equalizer at the end that is 24" above the water line.

    Noel
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,676
    Let me try

    That tee isn't looking too good- where it comes out of the boiler should 90 UP, get to at least 24" above the water line, then 90 into a horizontal "header", then after you pipe into the main, you'll have a 90 facing down, which connects to the return. This is called the equalizer.

    Gary

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  • jim_14
    jim_14 Member Posts: 268
    what about the hartford loop?

    It looks like there is a small one there, is it acceptable or did they cut corners here too??
  • the size would be in the

    installation instructions which can usually be found online at the boilers manufacturers web site..
  • Fred P
    Fred P Member Posts: 77
    so whats happening here? the steam is coming out

    the side of the boiler, what happens next? Does the water content immediatly drop down and back into the return?

    is this piping setup causing a lot of wet steam to go up into the main and rads??

    Im trying to picture this in my head
  • Boilerpro_3
    Boilerpro_3 Member Posts: 1,231
    It all depends on the steam velocity.

    If the pipe is big enough and the boiler output low enough you may see alot of the water drop out.

    Boilerpro
  • jim_14
    jim_14 Member Posts: 268
    funny thing

    is that this thing works, although the homeowner complains of having to add water every few days in winter season.. Although her efficiency isnt so great, we get about the same gas bills and my boiler is 55 years old and takes over an hour to get steam into the rads...hers takes about 20 mins
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,719
    If it takes an hour

    to get steam into your radiators, the boiler may be the cause- and it may not be. Are your steam mains insulated, and are there vents at the ends- if so, what make & model? How long are the mains and what pipe size?

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  • jim_14
    jim_14 Member Posts: 268
    my boiler is being replaced

    next week and a main vent will be added since there isnt one there now or ever before. And I insulated the mains a couple of years ago..didnt do much except keep the basement cooler and more bearable..
  • Fred P
    Fred P Member Posts: 77
    its a bryant and the website does not

    have the instruction manual online
  • Wethead7
    Wethead7 Member Posts: 170
    I think it's water

    Is that green thing a pump??
    The picture does noy show enough information.
  • bob young
    bob young Member Posts: 2,177
    steam & water

    a split system
  • Fred P
    Fred P Member Posts: 77
    its a taco circulating pump

    for hot water baseboard.. Is an aquastat required for hot water off boiler?
  • Wethead7
    Wethead7 Member Posts: 170
    Aquastat

    No the boiler should be warm enough.The aquastat would only add parts and make it more diffacult to work on later.

    The KISS method works best on these.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,719
    Actually, it's good to have one

    on a split system like this. If only the hot-water zone is calling for heat (not the steam zone) you don't want to get the boiler hot enough to make steam. So the aquastat would cut the burner off at 180 degrees or so. If the steam zone (or both zones) calls for heat, the aquastat is bypassed and the boiler can make steam.

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  • antman
    antman Member Posts: 182
    by-pass

    It should also have a bypass from the return water of baseboard so you can temper the water going to the baseboard system when the boiler is making steam.

    Ant

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  • A better picture would really help, the controls and that pump

    would lead me to believe that somethings wrong. I think that your neighbor needs a bigger basement, that boiler is a real tight pack.
This discussion has been closed.