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CO strikes again

Steamhead
Steamhead Member Posts: 16,723
on the top burners? If so, they may be set too high. This would cause the flames to strike the bottoms of the pans or griddle, cooling them down and producing CO. It can be difficult to clock the meter to verify BTU input on these little burners- do a differential clocking if you can.

I solved this problem on my 35-year-old Norge by turning the orifices down a bit. I also opened the air shutters as far as possible without causing the flames to lift off the burners, which further shortened the flames. Now they're down to about 50 PPM or less air-free, and Lucky the cat doesn't freak out when I use the stove.

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Comments

  • John R. Hall
    John R. Hall Member Posts: 2,246
    These were the lucky ones

    Another story about ignorance of the origins of CO. At least these guys survived.

    http://www.dpa.xtn.net/index.php?table=news&template=news.view.subscriber&newsid=105378
  • MIKE6
    MIKE6 Member Posts: 102
    Speaking of CO......

    I had a call to check the gas appliances for CO.After the Fire Dept. had 450ppm and the CO alarm went off.It was a warm day heat was not in use, awh had 9ppm,chimney was clear.No car in the garage.No exhaust fans in use.Dryer not in use.No smokers no candles no gasoline motors on in garage like a leaf blower etc.So what the heck is going on here? Second time Fire Dept. here this week,cust changed CO alarm after FD could not find any source of CO.Now as I walk past a picture on the wall I see someone I know.Great I'm at Lenny's house now I have to find the problem.I asked his wife what exactly did she do this morning.She made pancakes on a new griddle.I put the griddle which takes up 2 burners on the stove. I had readings of 999ppm.I turned the flames down and 750ppm showed.WOW I never saw this before.I took large pots and pans and tested. The larger the pan the more CO.My feeling is the pans smother the flames, not enough aircausing CO.The burner grates seem to be not high enough.This is a 2 year old range.How did this pass the AGA and UL testing? At least I found the problem now I think of all the times I could not find a problem Was it something like this? This is scary.450ppm in the bedroomsof a split level home.Nothing to laugh at.Be careful out there.

    Mike
  • rudy_2
    rudy_2 Member Posts: 135


    "Baines said 20 parts-per-million was “normal.” "

    Wonder what he means by that - zero is 'normal'.

    Had a tragic accident here in Athens, Ohio several weeks ago. Two city workers pumping water out of a sewer lift station with a gas powered pump.

    Guy went down to shut the pump down, CO levels were so high, it killed him almost instantly. The second went down to help his coworker, tried to hold his breath but it still put him in the hospital..... Fortunately he had called the FD before he went down to assist or he'd probably be dead as well.
  • rudy_2
    rudy_2 Member Posts: 135
    Gas ovens

    Putting a pan on the flame produces CO by cooling the flame down. When any part of a flame is lowered to below 1128 degrees F, CO will be produced.

    Believe it or not the ANSI Z21 standard for gas ovens (that are vented into the home) is 800 ppm (air free) while a furnace or boiler (vented to the outside) is only 400 ppm (air free) - go figure.

    Plus the ANSI standard was established in 1927 ... and we're still using it today.
  • Mark Hunt
    Mark Hunt Member Posts: 4,909
    Flame impingement


    I show this to folks all the time. I'll test the burners with nothing on them, which is how they pass AGA testing, then I put a pot of cold water on them. ZOOOOOOOOOOOM goes the CO.

    Try testing an oven. They are allowed to produce 800ppm!

    Mark H

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  • MIKE6
    MIKE6 Member Posts: 102
    range co

    I had the cust contact the manufacturer and ask for replacement grates and see if they had a recall.They sent a factory rep.He ordered new grates and the same ones came.Cust to call manufacturer again.I'm not invloved any more Lenny's wife doesn't want to spend money on this.She works for a law officeand wants the manufacturer to make free repairs.I told Lenny to call me when its over and I'll check for co again
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,723
    My oven

    produces less than 20 PPM a/f. And it's 35 years old.

    I can only recall one time when I couldn't get an oven below 50 PPM. That one puts out about 150, but this is better than the 1500+ it put out when I first got there. This lady is getting her kitchen redone and the stove will be replaced.

    To Learn More About This Contractor, Click Here to Visit Their Ad in "Find A Contractor"
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
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