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glove bags for asbestos removal

Why would you want to do this yourself. If you're a contractor, you're opening yourself up to some wicked liability. Here in Maine, a licensed oil trech can remove three linear feet or 1 sq ft of the stuff, but still have to use all containment, documentation and disposal manifesting as the abatement companies.
If your a homeowner....don't do it!!! Call a pro.

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Comments

  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member
    where can I buy glove bags

    Anyone know of a place in Westchester county NY or an online store where I can get glove bags?

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member
    where can I buy glove bags

    Anyone know of a place in Westchester county NY or an online store where I can get glove bags to remove a little pipe insulation?

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member
    where can I buy glove bags

    Anyone know of a place in Westchester county NY or an online store where I can get glove bags to remove a little pipe insulation?

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    I'm a homeowner. I don't have a big budget for asbestos removal. But I want to remove more than a couple feet so that I can add a couple new steam lines. I've seen plumbers just knock the stuff off with a channel-lock pliers and sweep it up off the floor. I'd like to do something a little safer than that, so I thought maybe a mask and a glove bag would be better than nothing.

    Do you order the stuff online?

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    I'm a homeowner. I don't have a big budget for asbestos removal. But I want to remove more than a couple feet so that I can add a couple new steam lines. I've seen plumbers just knock the stuff off with a channel-lock pliers and sweep it up off the floor. I'd like to do something a little safer than that, so I thought maybe a mask and a glove bag would be better than nothing.

    Do you have any recommendations for where to get the glove bags?

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • SOME states

    Will allow you to do this yourself (within limits). You can probably search anonymously on your states' governmental websites. IF allowed, you should be able to request/download info. Be aware that corrugated asbestos pipe insulation IS asbestos in one of its most potentially hazardous forms--it WILL have to be disposed of in an approved site REGARDLESS if you can or can't remove it yourself legally.

    If you have to get the men in white suits you may well want to consider having it ALL removed and re-insulate with a less liability-prone and more resale-friendly material. I frequently see this insulation "encapsulated" with fibered aluminum paint or similar. While this does help with the immediate issue and is certainly less expensive than removal, I believe it makes removal more difficult (and costly) down the road...
  • Mad DogMad Dog Posts: 2,595Member
    Don't make the foolish move, my brother...asbestos

    will come back to haunt u years later...and what about your family? Those numbskulls who "knock it off with channellocks" outta be locked up. Everyone has different tolerance to the stuff. That one time you do it...those few fibers....could kill you or your family...think about the guily you'll have, man! You'll always wonder..righ Tank
  • Hell bent

    OK, so you've chosen not to heed all the warnings about doing it yourself. Before you touch the stuff, spray it down gently with some water to keep it fron getting into the air; that way, you will reduce the chances of it getting into your lungs.

    As you remove the layers, spray down with more water the get the lower layers wet.

    All the best,

    Alan

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  • Mad DogMad Dog Posts: 2,595Member
    Ok, well , now that the gloves are off - pun intended

    it must be soapy water - very soapy. 1) This is the surfactant. Soap binds asbestos fibers much better than water.2) DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT JUST RIPPING IT DOWN in an open room, you must make a containment area with plastic. 3)
    Dont even think about using a regualr mask...it must be an asbestos-rated respirator. 4)you'd better triple-bag it. 5) Don't get caught trying to get rid of it, you'lll be in BIG trouble!!! 5) you are making a huge and hazardous mistake thinking you can do it yourself - listen to Tank!!!!!!!. I am only giving you this advice becasue you probably won't listen to any of us and I'd rather you do as little damage as possible to your home environment and your family's health, just don't wanna see no one get hurt. Sincerely. Mad Dog

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  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    Thanks for the warning. But spraying it down with water doesn't sound nearly as safe as a glove bag, no matter how soapy. Or am I missing something?
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    Well I do feel guilty that I let that plumber into my house, and I don't want to make that mistake again. That's why I am asking about glove bags.
  • Aidan (UK)Aidan (UK) Posts: 289Member
    Why?

    Why would the men in the disposable white suits, respirators, rubber boots and gloves go to the trouble of erecting airlocks and containment areas and double-bag this stuff?

    The reason is that they know what it can do and I fear that you do not.

    The dangerous stuff is not the dust that you've seen knocked on the floor. It is the microscopic fibres that you cannot see, which can remain suspended in the air for hours, during which time that air can be inhaled deep into the lungs. When the fibres do settle, they can be disturbed at a later date. Mesothelioma is about as nasty as it can get.

    There's lots of information on the internet about this. Read up on it so that you know what you're doing. I just did a Google search on 'mesothelioma', to make sure I'd spelt it correctly. I got 234,000 hits. Why should there be all that information on one illness? You do not want to get into this.
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    If I was doing it for a living, I would definitely want to do airlocks and boots. More importantly, I would also want some way of monitoring it in the air to tell whether it was there or not. I also would want to double protect everything in case of mistakes or accidents.

    But at this point I only want to remove enough for a couple new steam lines. Containment areas sound like overkill. But a good glove bag sounds prudent. Still don't know where to get one though.
  • Don WalshDon Walsh Posts: 131Member
    Asbestos

    Well guys, we got this horse to the trough, but he ain't a drinkin!

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  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    I appreciate all the warnings and advice, and I may even follow it.

    I was hoping for a direct answer, but maybe the answer is that no one buys or uses glove bags except the men in the white suits.

    Thanks anyway,
    Tim
  • Glove Bag

    Found a couple when searching but they specifically said NOT approved for hazardous material removal.

    I have a feeling that such are not available to mere mortals.

    DID though find EPA requirements when using a glove bag. STILL requires all of the decontamination chambers, negative HEPA filtered air pressure in the space, etc., etc., etc.

    I would nearly swear that "Big Brother" or his next-of-kin "Big Law" monitors the net for such things... For many months after I complained to the EPA about their new alkyd paint formulation requirements my firewall repeatedly detected intrusion attempts from an ip address linked to the US government.

    Find out if your state allows private removal. Some do in certain circumstance. Hysteria level varies greatly.

  • DougieDougie Posts: 12Member
    This is what you're risking

    The joke I used to tell when people asked how my Dad was, was, 'well he's 72 now and he can still kick my a##.' This was a guy who never took an easy day. Never met a harder worker. Never met a stronger, more stubborn man. Never saw a more horrible death.

    The only known cause of mesothelioma is asbestos exposure. This was proven to us when we called the workers comp people and they immediately accepted his claim without requiring proof of exposure. A good thing too, since he couldn’t remember ever being that close to asbestos, except for the asbestos brake pads on the drilling rigs he used to operate.

    Mesothelioma attacks the lining surrounding your lungs. You can’t fix it. Early detection might get you a couple years but by the time you notice the problem it’s too late. As the cancer eats out that sac, the pain becomes unbearable. My father, stubborn old coot that he was, refused to accept the death sentence the doctors handed him. He tried chemo, radiation, shark cartilage, you name it. He traveled the continent to see the best oncologists in NA. They just told him to go home. He became a shell of his former self, constantly attached to a catheter that collected the yellow poison that collected in his lungs. He kept fighting up to the very last day. That’s when the pain became unbearable even for this great man. A son should never have to see his father’s spirit broken.

    His last words were,’ Take me, you bastard, take me’.

    For chrissake don’t do this to you and your family!!
  • Mark HuntMark Hunt Posts: 4,909Member
    We used to


    have snowball fights with the stuff before it was dangerous. Heck, most of the playsand in sand boxes used to have some "white insulation" in it.

    I can't tell you where to get the glove bags because I do not know.

    Here in New York, a homeowner is allowed to remove the stuff themselves. Contractors are FORBIDDEN to touch it without the proper liscence.

    IMHO, you would have to expose yourself to a hell of a lot more of this stuff than you will with one removal job to cause a real health problem.

    That being said, "white insulation" will hang around in the air for a LOOOOOOOOOOOOONG time and you and the ones you love will be breathing it EVERY day.

    I know it costs a ton of money to have it removed, more than a new boiler installation in many cases, but this may be another one of those times when you need to bite the bullet and hire someone.

    BTW......anyone have any info on the number of people that die from asbestosis in the USA each year?

    Mark H

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  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    Thanks for looking. I think glove bags must be available to mere mortals, but perhaps there's too much liability in advertising them.
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    Thanks for the insight. I wasn't aware that contractors were forbidden from touching asbestos. Ironically, my guess is that this is why I'm having so much trouble finding them. Contractors can't buy glove bags.

    Tim
  • Mark HuntMark Hunt Posts: 4,909Member
    Hold on


    Liscenced Asbestos Abatement contractors will have access to all of those things.

    The folks here are NOT asbestos contractors, we're heating contractors. Two different trades all together.

    I could no sooner tell you where to get glove bags as I could tell you who had the best price on roofing nails. I don't do that for a living. I install heating systems and quite often they are COVERED in "white insulation".

    I just can't touch it sir, glove bags or no.

    You have to be a liscenced ASBESTOS ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR to play with this stuff, not a HEATING contractor.

    My brother is a contractor, he frames houses. Doesn't know squat about heating them, but he can nail the bejeezus out of them!!

    No disrespect sir, but you are asking the wrong people for info on glove bags.

    Mark H

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  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    thanks for the explanation. As I said, I had not realized that heating contractors were not allowed to touch the stuff, so clearly this was not a good place to ask the question. Sorry.

    I think it is ironic that the net effect of this regulation is to make glove bags harder to find. I wonder if MORE asbestos gets removed improperly than would be the case if contractors were allowed to remove it properly.

    Thanks again for clearing it up for me,
    Tim
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    I'm very sorry to hear about your dad. Sounds like a hard way to go.
  • T.J.T.J. Posts: 17Member
    Glove bag supplier

    Tim,
    I recently purchased glove bags from a supplier in NJ near where I live. They shipped them to me via UPS. I also purchased black 6 mil bags marked on the outside ASBESTOS. I too am a ambitious homeowner and with proper preparation and equipment including a rented negative air machine I think you should be OK. I will find the suppliers name and number if you are still interested...let me know.

    Good luck

    TJ
  • Tim GardnerTim Gardner Posts: 183Member


    Wow, I had given up on getting an answer to this one! Yes I would love to get the suppliers name and number!

    Thanks,
    Tim
  • Aidan (UK)Aidan (UK) Posts: 289Member
    RIP

    I hope he rests in peace, as well as the countless other good men killed, and still dying, from this insidious filth.


    I'm sorry if this stirred bad memories Dougie.
  • Don WalshDon Walsh Posts: 131Member
    raspberries

    Not only will the horse not drink, he is going to pee in his own trough!

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  • Asbestos Mortality

    http://www.wconline.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/features/BNP__Features__Item/0,3299,76784,00.html

    (Above mainly a social comment but it does mention trends.)

    Am looking for actual rates from CDC. Regardless of the real health risk asbestos is a TERRIBLE liability risk.

    Heating contractors open themselves to essentially unlimited liability if they even talk with others about removing the stuff, let alone touch it... Once the trial lawyers have gotten every drop out of the deepest pockets, they'll start pursuing those that aren't so deep.

    Homeowners though can sometimes deal with asbestos themselves IF they choose and IF they are willing to take the chance not only with their own person and their own family, but any FUTURE problems that may arise when they re-sell.

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/96-134/pdfs/96-134c.pdf

    Asbestosis mortality through 1992 (can't find newer data). 4.82 deaths per million, 959 total in the country. Highest in AL, WA, WV, NJ and DE. Average age at death: 74 years. Interesting that the graph there shows a nearly perfect parallel with increasing life expectancy and that even those who died from asbestosis lived longer than typical life of those at the beginning....

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2003-111/pdfs/2003-111h.pdf

    Mesothelioma: overall U.S. mortality in 1999 -- 11.65/million. Asbestos exposure is the only known/"proven"/assumed cause. Top three listed occupations of those who died: Managers/administrators, Housewives, Pipefitters with pipefitters/plumbers < ½ that of the above. Areas with highest incidence seem to bear ZERO resemblance to that of asbestosis.

    ------------------

    The ONLY class at any level that I EVER flunked was statistics--AND I flunked it twice with two different professors. Why? I essentially told the professors that they were absolutely full of crap if they EVER thought that statistics as calculated by the BEST minds using the FINEST equipment and the most PERFECT data can ever be considered "reliable" when related to ANYTHING human! You can "prove" almost any human thing, no matter how absurd, statistically--trial attorneys rely on this and they seek out the "dumbest" juries they can find!!!!!

    One of the professors blatently stated this "problem" in his opening lecture yet much of the class hinged on trying to "prove" human behaviour via statistics. Coins, cards and atoms are fine--they ARE predictable.

    Sorry for the rant...
  • SeattleNick_2SeattleNick_2 Posts: 24Member
    Here is an interesting site on asbestoz .....

    Lots of history.........


    http://www.bumc.bu.edu/SPH/Gallery/brodeur.html


    Photo caption:

    FRANK RUSSO 1949

    JM employee. Reaching in for a chest full of chrysotile asbestos fibers mixed-in with rayon fibers.
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