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Weil Mclain Boiler debri in exhaust

Dan M
Dan M Member Posts: 50
Since the begining of the heating season I noticed that no water was coming from the exhaust drain on my 2 year old Propane fired Weil-mclain Boiler. I removed the exhaust drain tube from the bottom of the exhaust pipe trap (Stainless steel pipe). The drain pipe has a flexible elbow which I found to be full of rust and scale ( about 3/4 of a dixie cup). I checked with a magnet and found that a lot of the debri was metalic. This boiler is a replacement for one that died after 6 years from what was labeled "Installation and boiler Design problems". This new boiler came (Free of charge) with two internal ciculators for mixing water within the boiler to prevent thermoshock of the jackets. The new boiler was hooked to the old system By a professinal with the advice of a Weil-Mclain tech help and the old ciclulator removed and placed with a Taco 011 running continuously (no other modifications to the system) for 2 seasons. The 011 pump was put on by the installer to solve ciculation problems that seemed to suddenly become a issue with the new boiler. The new pump was loud a had to run continously to get less that perfect flow in the entire two story farm house. The installer pretty much gave up and left me with poor ciculation and a noisy pump. After posting and asking questions on the Wall I replaced alot of piping and the high velocity pump with a 007. The water now ciculates well and the radiators get hot fast. The boiler water stays relativly warm all the time and the boiler cycles for short (5 minutes or less)runs rather than long drawn out cycles. The boiler seems to be running better than it ever has( Thanks to advice from people on this website) Rather than ramble on I'll get back to my original concern . The deri is from the past season before the repiping and pump change. Do you think I am heading for another trashed boiler or maybe have stopped the damage in time , or finally is it normal to have any rust and scale in a boiler exhaust trap. Thanks again
Dan

Comments

  • Dan M
    Dan M Member Posts: 50
    Debri in exhaust pipe

    Since the begining of the heating season I noticed that no water was coming from the exhaust drain on my 2 year old Propane fired Weil-mclain Boiler. I removed the exhaust drain tube from the bottom of the exhaust pipe trap (Stainless steel pipe). The drain pipe has a flexible elbow which I found to be full of rust and scale ( about 3/4 of a dixie cup). I checked with a magnet and found that a lot of the debri was metalic. This boiler is a replacement for one that died after 6 years from what was labeled "Installation and boiler Design problems". This new boiler came (Free of charge) with two internal ciculators for mixing water within the boiler to prevent thermoshock of the jackets. The new boiler was hooked to the old system By a professinal with the advice of a Weil-Mclain tech help and the old ciclulator removed and placed with a Taco 011 running continuously (no other modifications to the system) for 2 seasons. The 011 pump was put on by the installer to solve ciculation problems that seemed to suddenly become a issue with the new boiler. The new pump was loud and had to run continously to get less than perfect flow in the entire two story farm house. The installer pretty much gave up and left me with poor ciculation and a noisy pump. After posting and asking questions on the Wall I replaced alot of piping and the high velocity pump with a 007. The water now ciculates well and the radiators get hot fast. The boiler water stays relativly warm all the time and the boiler cycles for short (5 minutes or less)runs rather than long drawn out cycles. The boiler seems to be running better than it ever has( Thanks to advice from people on this website) Rather than ramble on I'll get back to my original concern . The deri is from the past season before the repiping and pump change. Do you think I am heading for another trashed boiler or maybe have stopped the damage in time , or finally is it normal to have any rust and scale in a boiler exhaust trap. Thanks again
    Dan
  • Gary Fereday
    Gary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    Dan M,

    I think here I'd start with a complete heat loss. Get the free calculator off this "wall". After you calculate the system as it should be, how close is it to the existing system? The boiler should run as long as possible. Short cycling is not all that efficient. I am gussing here that the boiler may be oversized for the job. You could easily take pressure & temps off the system and calculate what is there now. Boiler Flow and btu input and output . all must fit with the heat loss of the building. JMHO anyway bigugh
  • Gary Fereday
    Gary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    Oh !

    As far as the debrie goes, check it often as the season continues. That may have been just slag from manufacture. Check with your Tech rep, if it continues. bigugh
  • Chauncey
    Chauncey Member Posts: 43
    The internal pumps and the control module

    > As far as the debrie goes, check it often as the

    > season continues. That may have been just slag

    > from manufacture. Check with your Tech rep, if it

    > continues. bigugh



  • Chauncey
    Chauncey Member Posts: 43
    The internal pumps and the control module

    are designed to spare the boiler from operating with lots of cool water coming down the return, and causing prolonged periods of condensation. You might want to have someone check the sensor for the correct resistance. Also check that both pumps are operating. The boiler can do screwy stuff if one gets stuck. Do you by chnace have a meter on your propane? Yours would only be the second one that I had ever seen or heard of. (For purposes of checking the gas useage/firing rate of the boiler). Look under the inducer motor and be sure you have the red colored propane orifice plate installed. If your system is a radiant heat system W/M is looking for a bypass in the pipes coming up from the boiler into the system loop (primary-secondary piping) If you have a converted gravity system you need primary/ secondary. Only baseboard can be piped in and out. The control will lock out if the water from the return is cold for an extended period of time. Are you using a setback thermostat? C
This discussion has been closed.