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Gentlemen; I have a raised ranch 1200sq.ft. living area with a similar sized basement. I am remodeling and will be putting pex radiant floor heating in the living room- kitchen area and hall. I have thought of Runtal type radiator panels for the remainder of the house, where I can not put the pex in the floor. In the floor,not staple up for the pex. I will be doing a heat loss calc. shortly. The chimney is concrete block with the red clay type liner.

The question is,what would you recommend for a brand name oil fired boiler.This would also be used to heat my domestic hot water.

Presently I have a elec. hotwater heater and heat the whole house with a wood stove. the chimney is in good shape

Comments

  • Gary FeredayGary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    It reads like

    It reads like you have a good grip on the ideas you want to do! Consider any boiler you want! Most of todays boilers have to have a chimnsy liner as they operate extreamly close to the condensation point and that is tough on vertified clay chimneys, The trick is to be careful to do as the instructions (included with the boiler) for the chimney tell you. bigugh
  • cmbb_4cmbb_4 Member Posts: 2


    Bigugh; Do you mean the chimney should have one of those stainless retrofit liners that slide in the present clay liner or is the red vitrified ok?
  • Gary FeredayGary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    vertified clay?

    It depends upon the boiler, fuel, and the boiler recomendations. The thing here is condensation. Heating up the clay, bricks, concerte, or other structure may be to much for the flue gases. thereby allowing condensation to form. The boiler makes water in the process of combustion. (about 1 gallon per 100,000 buts of input per hour). This is added to the huimidity alerady existing in the atmosphere. You can get "rain" at any temp if the air cannot hold any more extra moisture. All you have to do to get "rain" is lower the temp a little. Fog on the ground on a hot summer day is one example. Dew upon your car the same time. and you are not the least bit cold! Pick your boiler from your idea of what it should be. maybe parts and service will help you consider it. Then install as to "ITS" recomendations.
  • Gary FeredayGary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    Most likely!

    Boilers today remove heat from the combustion of the fuel very efficiently. Water is a byproduct of that combustion. It (the water) is sent up the chimney. If the chimney takes out heat to warm itself the water will condensate. That water along with nasty other condensates can destroy a good chimney. The SS liner heats up quickly, and is insulated by the air space between it and the clay. No condensate! products of combustion go out the top.
    I'd almost plan to put one in your chimney to start with! The boiler you choose will have the last say! bigugh
  • Gary FeredayGary Fereday Member Posts: 427
    careful re-reading

    Of your original post leads me. to think that you want to use the chimney for two or more inputs. That is ok ! I'd check with local codes and or a contractor as to what is common in your area. I know it is not recommended for a gas fuel to be vented into a fireplace or shared with a fuel other than gas. Oil and wood are compatible in some instances. bigugh
  • Vernon P. JamesVernon P. James Member Posts: 42
    chimney

    If chimney is an interior chimney it should be ok with new boiler. If it is an exterior chimney IE> goes up outside of house rather than up center of house , a SS liner or sidewall venter is only way to go. The clay chimney will only last afew years if it is outside.
  • EarthfireEarthfire Member Posts: 543
    chimney liner

    A liner is more imperative on a inside chimney. IMHO a liner in required at any time that a solid fuel chimney is converted to liquid fuel use. The residue on the wall of the chimney can become very corrosive when wetted by the moisture that is part of the combustion byproducts of an on & off combustion cycle for oil & gas. The corrosive gunk in the chimney will destroy the mortar and even attack the masonary ( brick,block) As the mortar breaks down it opens a path for combustion gasses to enter the structure. A stainless liner is cheap insurance in the long run.
  • cmbb_4cmbb_4 Member Posts: 2


    Thanks guys! Will look into it.
  • Chris MaderiaChris Maderia Member Posts: 120
    Best Boiler or Best Boiler for Your Application

    THis question could be anwsered simply by asking another question? What are you looking to achieve? Is the radiant floor going to be mixing using a modulating mixing vlv, injection, or simple thermostatic? I would recommend a Buderus or Viessmann Viterond. Simple because it seems that you are looking for efficiency and comfort. With both boilers you can achieve a high temp reset curve for your basesboard and a low temp curve for your radiant. This will offer you the comfort and efficiency I think you are looking for.
  • Chris MaderiaChris Maderia Member Posts: 120
    Best Boiler or Best Boiler for Your Application

    THis question could be anwsered simply by asking another question? What are you looking to achieve? Is the radiant floor going to be mixing using a modulating mixing vlv, injection, or simple thermostatic? I would recommend a Buderus or Viessmann Viterond. Simple because it seems that you are looking for efficiency and comfort. With both boilers you can achieve a high temp reset curve for your basesboard and a low temp curve for your radiant. This will offer you the comfort and efficiency I think you are looking for.
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