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Recip / Sawzalls

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ChrisJ
ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
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  • delcrossv
    delcrossv Member Posts: 742
    edited February 28
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    Plug in Milwaukee.  I also have a Porter Cable  Tiger Saw as a backup-  also plug in. 
    Trying to squeeze the best out of a Weil-McLain JB-5 running a 1912 1 pipe system.
    ChrisJ
  • STEAM DOCTOR
    STEAM DOCTOR Member Posts: 1,973
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    ChrisJ said:
    I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

    Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

    Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


    Both. All Milwaukee. Depends how much control I need. 
    ChrisJ
  • Jamie Hall
    Jamie Hall Member Posts: 23,324
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    Plug in Milwaukee

    Wouldn't mind having their big battery one, though...
    Br. Jamie, osb
    Building superintendent/caretaker, 7200 sq. ft. historic house museum with dependencies in New England
    ChrisJ
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
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    delcrossv said:
    Plug in Milwaukee.  I also have a Porter Cable  Tiger Saw as a backup-  also plug in. 
    ChrisJ said:
    I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

    Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

    Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


    Both. All Milwaukee. Depends how much control I need. 


    I have a lot of 4" cast iron I'm cutting out.
    I won't be in a rush and won't be getting it all done even in a weekend but I'm concerned a battery saw is going to annoy me the entire time.

    But I can't help but wonder considering how strong the drills are now.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,670
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    I would go with battery unless you're really using it for heavy duty work. I really like my other makita battery stuff. I have miwaukee battery stuff at work and it is probably fine for homeowner use but makita stuff is heavier duty. the difference between just picking it up and using it vs having to get out an extension cord then put it away for just a little thing is night and day.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,544
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    Everyone uses battery now extension cords are obsolete LLO

    8 years ago, when the big Casino build was going on here in Springfield there were hundreds of tradesmen on the job. You never saw so many battery tools in your life. Mostly Milwaukee. Extension cords may not be a problem in your home but with hundreds of people on a job and OSHA lurking..............

    That being said I hate it when batteries run down. If your cutting 4" CI I would use a cord, but I am old I like cords.

    One very handy tool is the Milwaukee "hackzall" nice and light and great for cutting a pipe out of a fitting but you wouldn't want to cut 4" CI with it
    Tommi68
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,158
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    Do you have a battery system now? If you have 18V Milwaukee the 2720 is a beast of a cordless. Heavy and heavy duty. Have at least one spare battery ready to go, if you are doing continuous cutting.

    I'd guess Dewalt or Makita have similar power if that is the system you have.

    Sharp blades make a huge difference in cordless saws battery life. Of any type.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    ChrisJLarry Weingartenmattmia2Dave Carpentier
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
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    hot_rod said:
    Do you have a battery system now? If you have 18V Milwaukee the 2720 is a beast of a cordless. Heavy and heavy duty. Have at least one spare battery ready to go, if you are doing continuous cutting. I'd guess Dewalt or Makita have similar power if that is the system you have. Sharp blades make a huge difference in cordless saws battery life. Of any type.
    I have a few DeWalt 20v batteries.

    I was considering this


    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Intplm.
  • STEAM DOCTOR
    STEAM DOCTOR Member Posts: 1,973
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    ChrisJ said:
    delcrossv said:
    Plug in Milwaukee.  I also have a Porter Cable  Tiger Saw as a backup-  also plug in. 
    ChrisJ said:
    I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

    Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

    Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


    Both. All Milwaukee. Depends how much control I need. 


    I have a lot of 4" cast iron I'm cutting out.
    I won't be in a rush and won't be getting it all done even in a weekend but I'm concerned a battery saw is going to annoy me the entire time.

    But I can't help but wonder considering how strong the drills are now.
    Definitely corded. Unless you have tight spots. I use Milwaukee and am very satisfied. Get Diablo heavy metal blades. Will cut like butter. Worth every penny. You can probably get away with one blade for entire job. 
    clammyChrisJkcoppdelcrossv
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
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    ChrisJ said:
    delcrossv said:
    Plug in Milwaukee.  I also have a Porter Cable  Tiger Saw as a backup-  also plug in. 
    ChrisJ said:
    I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

    Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

    Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


    Both. All Milwaukee. Depends how much control I need. 


    I have a lot of 4" cast iron I'm cutting out.
    I won't be in a rush and won't be getting it all done even in a weekend but I'm concerned a battery saw is going to annoy me the entire time.

    But I can't help but wonder considering how strong the drills are now.
    Definitely corded. Unless you have tight spots. I use Milwaukee and am very satisfied. Get Diablo heavy metal blades. Will cut like butter. Worth every penny. You can probably get away with one blade for entire job. 
    Any opinion on their 12a vs 15a "super sawzall" ?

    I never mind investing in tools.  I suppose my main question is does it just end up heavier and bigger for no reason 90% of the time.



    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Dave Carpentier
    Dave Carpentier Member Posts: 590
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    Im a Milwaukee guy (but was impressed once with a Makita cordless with a reasonably worn blade on quite a few tree branches , that thing just kept cutting).
    So definitely get a Milwaukee.
    I hate dragging around cords, stepping on them etc
    30+ yrs in telecom outside plant.
    Currently in building maintenance.
  • STEAM DOCTOR
    STEAM DOCTOR Member Posts: 1,973
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    ChrisJ said:
    ChrisJ said:
    delcrossv said:
    Plug in Milwaukee.  I also have a Porter Cable  Tiger Saw as a backup-  also plug in. 
    ChrisJ said:
    I just broke the spindle on my 13a Milwaukee.  

    Wondering what everyone's favorite saw is these days?

    Are you still using plugin saws or battery?


    Both. All Milwaukee. Depends how much control I need. 


    I have a lot of 4" cast iron I'm cutting out.
    I won't be in a rush and won't be getting it all done even in a weekend but I'm concerned a battery saw is going to annoy me the entire time.

    But I can't help but wonder considering how strong the drills are now.
    Definitely corded. Unless you have tight spots. I use Milwaukee and am very satisfied. Get Diablo heavy metal blades. Will cut like butter. Worth every penny. You can probably get away with one blade for entire job. 
    Any opinion on their 12a vs 15a "super sawzall" ?

    I never mind investing in tools.  I suppose my main question is does it just end up heavier and bigger for no reason 90% of the time.



    Can't really compare. I have been using the 15a for quite a while. Don't feel the weight at all. Wouldn't even consider that I factor. If you are strong enough to work on 4" cast iron, than I doubt you will notice that you are even holding the sawzall. And for what it's worth, I am not a big guy at all. Quite the contrary. 
  • dko
    dko Member Posts: 603
    edited February 28
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    6538-21 is the only active SKU for a corded "Super Sawzall"
    15a, 1-1/4" stroke, orbital action, variable speed trigger, and speed dial.

    The only other active corded sawzall from Milwaukee is the
    6509-31
    12a, 3/4" stroke. thats it

    Discontinued models are still available all over the internet, but officially- those are the only two corded sawzalls left. Many did like the 13a's

    What you will want depends on what you're cutting.
    Heavy demo definitely the super sawzall, when speed is the focus. orbital action is tremendous in wood cutting.
    it can do it all as you can dial it in to whatever the situation needs.

    Fine cutting and smaller diameter pipe the regular 12a is good enough. it can do everything the 15a can, just slower.

    Plumbers tend to grab the cordless Hackzall way more often. Lighter, more control, and fits in tight spaces.

  • STEAM DOCTOR
    STEAM DOCTOR Member Posts: 1,973
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    And if you are using the proper blades,.you will barely be holding the sawzall anyway. Those Diabolo blades are unbelievable.  Heavy metal carbide. They are available on supply house or Amazon. They also have the amped which I think are a bit better
    Long Beach Ed
  • dko
    dko Member Posts: 603
    edited February 28
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    The purpose of the Diablo Amp'd blades is to get better value (last longer than the carbide). But most burn it out just the same and isn't worth the extra cost. If you are the type to use blades with care (lubricate when needed, control speed), then go for it.

    From what I see, no matter what blade it is, it's turn it up full blast, full speed, no lubrication, cut back to back nonstop, notice subsequent cuts are taking a bit longer (heat), then toss the blade.

    When the bosses tell me to stop giving his guys the Amp'd version, I completely understand.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
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    And if you are using the proper blades,.you will barely be holding the sawzall anyway. Those Diabolo blades are unbelievable.  Heavy metal carbide. They are available on supply house or Amazon. They also have the amped which I think are a bit better
    The Diablo blade I think played a part in my mistake tonight.  100% my fault, but.

    I'm trying to cut the pipe out of a very tight spot in a wall and trying not to poke thru the other side of a plaster wall.   The issue is I think the pipe is next to a stud, which I didn't notice at first because it's behind lath and I think the blunt end of the Diablo blade was hitting the inside back of the pipe. Either that or that and the stud.

    Trying to get the pipe cut out fast as I had a friend on the roof ready to pull the pipe out and it started pouring out (bad planning on my part) .

    Either way i failed the task at hand.  Now I wish I had just used the 9" instead of 6" blade and just fixed the plaster.



    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,963
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    Battery powered Saws have come a long way but still mostly stay in their boxes.  Cordless, hand drills, yes, Sawzall can't keep up when you're rocking & rolling. Diabloes are insanely good..Mad Dog 🐕 
    ChrisJdelcrossvLong Beach Ed
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,670
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    If framers are now using cordless saws i'm not so sure the cordless reciprocating saws aren't up to the job now.
    reggi
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,158
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    For me it comes down to dealing with cords, plugs, trip hazards, or battery change outs throughout the day

    I would say the power is about equal now a days.

    I built  my entire shop with cordless tools a couple years back. Drills, saws, nailers, laser level. Its nice to be cord free on ladders, and scaffolds. Roof framing and sheathing is nice without hoses and cords.

    if I had to cut a steel I beam with a saw, a corded tool would be a better choice

    Its good to own both types. Corded tools are dirt cheap at pawn shops 🤫
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    ethicalpaulmattmia2
  • WMno57
    WMno57 Member Posts: 1,280
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    I like using both corded and cordless. Depends on the task.
    As Hotrod said, used corded tools are a bargain. I've picked up a couple dozen made in USA Milwaukee, Porter Cable, and Skill at estate sales. Including a Milwaukee 75th anniversary sawzall , drill, and toy truck.

    I DIY.
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,963
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    Believe me, I don't need a cord to trip over either, but when you have to drill dozens of Shields in to concrete of a lot of Sawzall cuts, I dont have to cone down off the ladder or lift every 6 times.  Mad Dog 🐕 
    ChrisJ
  • ScottSecor
    ScottSecor Member Posts: 856
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    I have been using Milwaukee brand Sawzall's almost exclusively for the last forty years. About ten years ago we switched from corded to cordless. Admittedly, we are not easy on these saws. We have had four different models in the last few years, not one of them has worked as designed for more than one year. We typically use them on boiler demo jobs, so there is regularly some standing water in the pipes.

    We switched to using band saws whenever possible to reduce the vibrations and we get a lot more cuts per blade. I agree with others regarding sawzall blades, I would rather spend the extra money on good blades as compared to switching blades after two or three cuts.
    ChrisJMad Dog_2
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,544
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    I agree with @ScottSecor about band says being superior to cut with and when you know what you are doing and don't twist the blade you can keep the same blade for a long time. But you have to have enough room to maneuver it around the pipe and you get a smoother cut and less vibration on your arms.

    But a sawzall will do anything a band saw can do just not as well.

    In the case above the sawzall is the best choice for 4" CI in a tight spot.

    The best way to cut CI is with a grinder and a cutting disk...like cutting butter.
    ChrisJLong Beach Ed
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
    edited February 28
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    After all of the comments etc...

    I think I'm going to stop and pickup a 15A super sawzall.....
    Just seems like the right move.

    It's going to make things even worse in this tight spot, but it'll make the rest of the work easier.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Mad Dog_2
  • Zman
    Zman Member Posts: 7,569
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    I like the 20 volt dewalt because of the different blade configurations. It's nice to be able to load sideways.
    I also have an older Milwaukee Super Sawzall for my bigger screwups. :o
    "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"
    Albert Einstein
    mattmia2rick in Alaska
  • Alan Welch
    Alan Welch Member Posts: 268
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    Harbor Freight rotating head sawzall with quick change blade. Well worth the 20 dollars when on sale. Throw it away if you break it, but I found it surprisingly tough cutting tree roots in the dirt . Cheaper than replacing chain saw blades.
  • SlamDunk
    SlamDunk Member Posts: 1,583
    edited February 28
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    Why not a cheap soil pipe cutter from harbor freight or Amazon. A lot quieter and cleaner. My local home depot rents them...Otherwise, corded and battery DeWalt works well for me.
  • pecmsg
    pecmsg Member Posts: 4,861
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    I use my band saw more and more!
    SlamDunkIntplm.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,670
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    Unless it is completely trashed you could just get the part that broke in your old sawzall and fix it and save your money for the cordless version for everything else.
  • delcrossv
    delcrossv Member Posts: 742
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    SlamDunk said:

    Why not a cheap soil pipe cutter from harbor freight or Amazon. A lot quieter and cleaner. My local home depot rents them...Otherwise, corded and battery DeWalt works well for me.

    I haven't used my Ridgid snap cutter on the past 3 jobs. Just easier to use the Sawzall with Diablo blades.
    If I had to do a whole house, then maybe. But for a couple of cuts, Sawzall all the time.
    Trying to squeeze the best out of a Weil-McLain JB-5 running a 1912 1 pipe system.
    STEAM DOCTOR
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,963
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    I've had my Supersawzall 20 yrs.  Diablo blades. That's all I'll buy now.  Mad Dog 🐕 
    STEAM DOCTOR
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
    edited February 29
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    Mad Dog_2 said:

    I've had my Supersawzall 20 yrs.  Diablo blades. That's all I'll buy now.  Mad Dog 🐕 

    For what it's worth the 15A SuperSawzall I bought yesterday says right on it "Professionally made in China by Milwaukee"

    I guess that's supposed to sound better than "China" or "Made in China".

    My dad still has a "Heavy Duty Sawzall" he got back in the late 80's that apparently is 4 amps and all the power he's ever needed. It has a metal case.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Mad Dog_2mattmia2
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,963
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    Remember in the 1990s when China Renamed a manufacturing town "USA" so they could say Made In USA 🇺🇸?   Mad Dog 
    Intplm.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,706
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    Mad Dog_2 said:

    Remember in the 1990s when China Renamed a manufacturing town "USA" so they could say Made In USA 🇺🇸?   Mad Dog 

    That was Japan and the city was named Usa long before WWII.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
    Mad Dog_2Intplm.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,544
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    Most of the Milwaukee stuff is good but not as good as it used to be. My old boss had a Millwaukee "hole Shooter" 3/8 corded drill with a metal case that he bought in 1946. When he died in 1988 it still worked just as good. I bought one in 1977 3/8 corded 1200 rpm. Mine is reversable his was not It will break your wrist if you're not careful. Had it apart for new grease and a new cord and maybe a new chuck I forget. Of course with the battery tools it doesn't get much use now. Has a metal case and plastic handle. Cost me $75 new I thought that was outrageous.
    Intplm.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,670
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    BTW, you can press the chuck apart and clean and re-lubricate it. Usually they aren't worn, they are just dirty.
  • CLamb
    CLamb Member Posts: 281
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    ChrisJ said:

    Mad Dog_2 said:

    I've had my Supersawzall 20 yrs.  Diablo blades. That's all I'll buy now.  Mad Dog 🐕 

    For what it's worth the 15A SuperSawzall I bought yesterday says right on it "Professionally made in China by Milwaukee"

    I guess that's supposed to sound better than "China" or "Made in China".
    Maybe it's to allay fears it's made by slave labor.
    Long Beach Ed
  • delcrossv
    delcrossv Member Posts: 742
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    CLamb said:

    ChrisJ said:

    Mad Dog_2 said:

    I've had my Supersawzall 20 yrs.  Diablo blades. That's all I'll buy now.  Mad Dog 🐕 

    For what it's worth the 15A SuperSawzall I bought yesterday says right on it "Professionally made in China by Milwaukee"

    I guess that's supposed to sound better than "China" or "Made in China".
    Maybe it's to allay fears it's made by slave labor.
    "Professional" slaves. Not a job for amateurs.
    Trying to squeeze the best out of a Weil-McLain JB-5 running a 1912 1 pipe system.
    Long Beach Ed
  • Panheadsforever
    Panheadsforever Member Posts: 21
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    For cutting pipe You need one that is straight and not orbital (for wood) or just buy a cordless band saw….so much superior.
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 6,963
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    Anyone still .own Milwaukee Hole Hog? Aka The Widow maker, Jaw Breaker, The Pig 🐖?  Up on an 8 foot ladder drilling floor joists with a 4.5" Wood bit....mad Dog 
    Long Beach Edgunn308