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Abandoning basement oil tanks

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jesmed1
jesmed1 Member Posts: 560
edited September 2023 in Oil Heating
We have two fairly new (5 yrs old) 275-gal oil tanks in the basement. We may be switching to gas burners in the boilers, so may be abandoning the oil tanks in place, and I'd like to know what the rules are for that.

I know we'll have to remove the two fill pipes that go through the wall to the outside. We have two jacketed copper feed lines that run inside the concrete floor over to the oil tanks. Can I just leave those feed lines in place and cap them where the would normally connect to the oil burners? There are ball valves at the tank exit, so obviously we'd close those. And I have a compressor, so could blow those lines out first back into the tank if that is advisable.

We have about 330 gallons of oil left in the tank. Ideally we'd try to burn as much of it as possible before switching to gas, but I don't want to wait until we're in the middle of the heating season to make the switch in case anything goes wrong. So it might be preferable if we could offer the oil at a discount to someone with the proper equipment (explosion proof pump, etc) who would be willing to pump it out. Is that possible, or are there rules/regulations against that?

Thanks in advance for any words of wisdom.

Comments

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,889
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    In most locations, legally you have to remove the tanks.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • jesmed1
    jesmed1 Member Posts: 560
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    Steamhead said:

    In most locations, legally you have to remove the tanks.

    OK, thanks. I have reviewed my state regs (MA) and they cover underground tanks, but I couldn't find anything about above-ground tanks. I'll call my local building inspector and Fire Dept and see what they say.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,607
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    @jesmed1

    I am in MA. If the tanks are not connected to anything and are not used (abandoned)they must be removed as far as I know.
  • jesmed1
    jesmed1 Member Posts: 560
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    @jesmed1

    I am in MA. If the tanks are not connected to anything and are not used (abandoned)they must be removed as far as I know.

    OK, thanks Ed. A local installer I talked to said he would just remove the fill pipes, but maybe he didn't know the rules. I'll confirm tomorrow with the building inspector/Fire Dept.
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 2,805
    edited September 2023
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    Why would want to leave them in the basement ?

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

  • jesmed1
    jesmed1 Member Posts: 560
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    Big Ed_4 said:

    Why would want to leave them in the basement ?

    Because we have plenty of room to just drain them and leave them where they are. Removing them is going to cost more.
  • Waher
    Waher Member Posts: 253
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    jesmed1 said:

    @jesmed1
    A local installer I talked to said he would just remove the fill pipes, but maybe he didn't know the rules. I'll confirm tomorrow with the building inspector/Fire Dept.

    If the local 'installer' doesn't know the rules they shouldn't be doing the job nor should you be hiring them to do work which may wind up being nonconforming with regulations and proper trade practices.