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Isn't this unique??

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  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,241
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    There are a few blocks of these 100 yr old homes in my Village. Each Chimney is a little different.  Some have crosses built in..My Architect buddy said the Style is
    "Old  Lexington."  I wish I did mt Chimney like this 23 yrs ago.  Mad Dog  🐕 
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 2,827
    edited July 2023
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    Klinker bricks , when a stack goes into the kiln to bake . The center sometimes over cooked.. They were freebies for the masons

    There was an error rendering this rich post.

    Mad Dog_2
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,166
    edited July 2023
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    Mad Dog_2 said:

    Isn't this unique??

    Not really Matt.
    You just need to find an Italian mason
    That hired Irish workers.
    With a French CSR that could sell the work as Art.

    A truly international company.

    Is that inappropriate in the 2020s?

    It was funny in the 1970s

    Edit: You could practise rock climbing at home!

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

    CLambMikeAmannMad Dog_2Dave Carpentier
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
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    The trick is to make haphazard look intentional. Very nicely done!
    8.33 lbs./gal. x 60 min./hr. x 20°ΔT = 10,000 BTU's/hour

    Two btu per sq ft for degree difference for a slab
  • retiredguy
    retiredguy Member Posts: 930
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    That chimney looks like a "work of art". I am impressed.
    Mad Dog_2
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,241
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    Right?  Klinker bricks are b
    Cool 😎" Mad Dog 
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,949
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    i've seen a lot from about the 20's through the 50's. the klinker bricks are usually used for structural things where they won't be visible. one of the university buildings built in the 50's has the klinker bricks of all the styles in my mom's neighborhood that was built in the 50's in the brick walls forming the rough space that an auditorium is built within.
  • MikeL_2
    MikeL_2 Member Posts: 506
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      I've seen a bit of that wonderful type of novelty brick & stone work in Floral Park Queens; not limited to chimneys.
      
      
    Mad Dog_2
  • bburd
    bburd Member Posts: 933
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    There's a bit of that around southern New England too, mostly in homes built in the 1920s.

    Bburd
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,241
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    Wow Mike.. These are Floral Park Village (Nassau) but Covert Ave.  Mad Dog 🐕 
  • tim smith
    tim smith Member Posts: 2,774
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    There is a house in our neighborhood that is all done in klinker. Always have admired it.
    Mad Dog_2
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,241
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    I think it looks great...Olde Lexington....Mad Dog 🐕 
  • Dave Carpentier
    Dave Carpentier Member Posts: 604
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    Dunno if I appreciate the full length bricks at wildly off angles.
    But the eclectic collection of brick chunks, the burned ones, rocks, etc... love it.
    30+ yrs in telecom outside plant.
    Currently in building maintenance.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,915
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    If that's a style, it's not for me.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • The Steam Whisperer
    The Steam Whisperer Member Posts: 1,219
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    Yeah, I always loved those...but I tend to favor those styles. I always thought of it as what you'd get if you gave a stone mason bricks to work with. There's a number of homes around my neighborhood that have that have those clinker bricks
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  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,915
    edited July 2023
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    Yeah, I always loved those...but I tend to favor those styles. I always thought of it as what you'd get if you gave a stone mason bricks to work with. There's a number of homes around my neighborhood that have that have those clinker bricks


    My house, as well as most of the others in the area have field stone foundations.

    I'm curious where all of those nice round stones came from........... Did you buy a load of field stone? How did this work in the 1800s? The closest large river to us is about 2 miles. That's a long way to haul all that stone.

    It's called field stone.......but they're very round and I don't see them finding all of that on the land. Not my tiny lot.....

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • MikeL_2
    MikeL_2 Member Posts: 506
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       I grew up on a dairy farm in CT and every spring we towed a stone boat around the cornfields to gather / roll stones onto.
       It's amazing how many stones the earth would burp up over the winter; many of them about head size,  and round, oblong, & polished.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,949
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    ChrisJ said:


    I'm curious where all of those nice round stones came from........... Did you buy a load of field stone? How did this work in the 1800s? The closest large river to us is about 2 miles. That's a long way to haul all that stone.

    It's called field stone.......but they're very round and I don't see them finding all of that on the land. Not my tiny lot.....

    Most of the rubble foundations I have seen had concrete block or finished stone or brick above ground so I think in most cases the material was hauled in. They had to haul the dirt somewhere too.
  • The Steam Whisperer
    The Steam Whisperer Member Posts: 1,219
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    MikeL_2 said:

       I grew up on a dairy farm in CT and every spring we towed a stone boat around the cornfields to gather / roll stones onto.
       It's amazing how many stones the earth would burp up over the winter; many of them about head size,  and round, oblong, & polished.

    I remember this too during my years out in the farmlands of northern Illinois... lots of big round stones pulled from the fields.
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  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,915
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    mattmia2 said:
    I'm curious where all of those nice round stones came from........... Did you buy a load of field stone? How did this work in the 1800s? The closest large river to us is about 2 miles. That's a long way to haul all that stone. It's called field stone.......but they're very round and I don't see them finding all of that on the land. Not my tiny lot.....
    Most of the rubble foundations I have seen had concrete block or finished stone or brick above ground so I think in most cases the material was hauled in. They had to haul the dirt somewhere too.
    These, including mine are field stone all the way up.  Roughly 20" thick at the bottom and 16" near the top.

    Then lightly parged.
    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • Mad Dog_2
    Mad Dog_2 Member Posts: 7,241
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    We constantly had to walk the 5/8th Mile training track on the Farm 🚜 picking large rounded rocks from egg 🥚 size to cantaloupe size, so these 1/2 Million dollat Thoroughbreds don't turn an ankle or bruise a frog 🐸.   Mad Dog 🐕 
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,105
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    I am on the edge of the sandhills of NE.
    The largest stone we might see is golf ball size and that is pumped up from a gravel/sand pit. You buy the gravel, the sand is free for the hauling.

    Anything larger must be trucked here about 100 miles from SD.

    We have a good collection as our son and wife would truck some back here when visiting.

    I know of 3 early 1900's buildings that have flat "river stones" for foundation walls.
    All others, if a good foundation, have poured concrete.
  • ChrisJ
    ChrisJ Member Posts: 15,915
    edited July 2023
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    JUGHNE said:

    I am on the edge of the sandhills of NE. The largest stone we might see is golf ball size and that is pumped up from a gravel/sand pit. You buy the gravel, the sand is free for the hauling. Anything larger must be trucked here about 100 miles from SD. We have a good collection as our son and wife would truck some back here when visiting. I know of 3 early 1900's buildings that have flat "river stones" for foundation walls. All others, if a good foundation, have poured concrete.

    Where my parents built there's a few foundations left from old houses that rotted away. They're all built from very flat grey shale stacked.  But that's what is very plentiful in that area.

    When I dug my two sump pits I was blessed by finding two huge chunks of quartz in the way. I hammer drilled and busted what I could out of the way. Lots of fun...

    Apparently there's a lot of quartz here.

    Single pipe quasi-vapor system. Typical operating pressure 0.14 - 0.43 oz. EcoSteam ES-20 Advanced Control for Residential Steam boilers. Rectorseal Steamaster water treatment
  • reggi
    reggi Member Posts: 522
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    JUGHNE said:
    I am on the edge of the sandhills of NE. The largest stone we might see is golf ball size and that is pumped up from a gravel/sand pit. You buy the gravel, the sand is free for the hauling. Anything larger must be trucked here about 100 miles from SD. We have a good collection as our son and wife would truck some back here when visiting. I know of 3 early 1900's buildings that have flat "river stones" for foundation walls. All others, if a good foundation, have poured concrete.
    The Sandhills sounds like a place that any Fieldstone that WAS around was probably made of sandstone and pressure and mother nature took care of the rest...
    Though you should of gotten a good supply from Glacier activity... probably in the history books of those schools you've been maintaining 🍎
    One way to get familiar something you know nothing about is to ask a really smart person a really stupid question