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Burnham Series 2 - error code 63 - Maximum Recycles Exceeded

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lbeachmike
lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
I have a Burnham Series 2 and we had no heat/hot water this morning - when i looked in the system it showed error code 63 (which is Maximum Recycles Exceeded). I turned the system off and back on again, it fired up.

The troubleshooting document for the system says this is what happens if it tries to fire up 6 times and if it can't start, it tries again in an hour.

Any thoughts on why this would have happened and what I should do to prevent it from happening again? Is this an owner fix or better to not do it myself?

Thanks
Mike

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  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,153
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    How old is the Burnham boiler? More than 2 years... When was the last time you had it professionally serviced for maintenance.

    In the booklet you looked up the error code, look in the section called MAINTENANCE for your answer as to whether you want to do that work yourself or if you want to call a Pro.

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    Hi Ed - I believe it is about seven years old. It's been looked at within two years but not serviced. The heating company that was here did not recommend any service for it when they looked at it.

    I'm fine with getting it serviced if the work performed specifically resolves my problem. So that I better understand my specific servicing needs, what specifically needs to get addressed in order to resolve this issue. And how can the cause be definitively determined so that we are certain that the service will address it?
  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    It looks like I have a bigger issue, or side effect of the issue. I see a small amount of water on the floor coming off of the relief valve. Do I need to shut this down until I have somebody look at it?

    It's also worth noting that, a couple months ago, the gas company moved the meter outside to install high-pressure gas service from the street. Not sure if related or coincidence.
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 994
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    Check your manifold gas pressure if you have the capabilities . Error code indicates that you are getting ignition but are losing it. The fact that you had your gas line upgraded could have sent dirt into the gas valve which will plug up the inlet screen. A gas pressure check on both sides of gas valve will let you know if it’s a faulty gas valve.
  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    Thanks - is this possible even though the gas meter work was done two months ago and it has been working fine all of this time? The scenario you mention sounds like the impacts would be quickly noticed. Also, isn't this error code most commonly due to a bad flame sensor?
  • pedmec
    pedmec Member Posts: 994
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    According to the service manual if it fails to light on ignition it will retry indefinitely. If it lights and then you lose flame after burner lights it will go into lockout after it loses flame 6 times.

     Take the cover off and watch the screen of the control. If it’s “sta 10” code then it’s ignition failure. If it’s “sta 13” your losing flame as it’s running. Could have a backdraft blowing off the flame sensor too but with the new gas line installed and the high pressure line I would lean that way first. Disturbing the gas line can alway cause sediment to break free. Could be the outdoor regulator not set right or defective too. 
  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    Thanks guys - this was resolved via replacing the flame sensor. I guess there is no way to prove if this was caused by the gas meter change?
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,838
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    Gas service issues wouldn't damage the flame sensor.
  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
    edited October 2022
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    Perhaps I misunderstood my plumber. There a gas line with a little "thimble" thing on the flame sensor assembly - he said that it was most likely that which was the issue. I thought the entire part was the "flame sensor." One or more people had said that it was possible that commonly gets gunked up - hence the association. To be clear - not a "gas service issue" per se, but perhaps dirt/dust blown through the line inadvertently when it was newly installed.
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,153
    edited October 2022
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    if you look at the manual that comes with your boiler, there is a recommended annual maintenance. I would wager that checking and cleaning the flame sensor is included in those recommendations.   Another is vent inspection and another is condensation trap cleaning 

    so maintenance might have prevented your failure 

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    The boiler came with my house. I do not have a manual for it, so I do not know the recommended maintenance schedule. I will try getting that from Burnham. Thanks for the advice.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,838
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    It should be on their web site. debris could clog the pilot burner but it also can be cleaned pretty easily in all but the most extreme cases.
  • lbeachmike
    lbeachmike Member Posts: 195
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    Given the labor to take things apart and clean them, and then the uncertainty of how much life is left on the part after ten years of use, didn't it make more sense to replace it? It's a different perspective as a homeowner paying somebody for the work versus DIY, where it's only my own time.
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,153
    edited October 2022
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    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?

  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 8,153
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    “Given the labor to take things apart and clean them, and then the uncertainty of how much life is left on the part after ten years of use, didn't it make more sense to replace it? It's a different perspective as a homeowner paying somebody for the work versus DIY, where it's only my own time “


    A 10 year old flame sensor that was not maintained that is the cause of the problem should certainly be replaced 

    just Saying that maintenance would have resolved this before it was a no heat problem 

    Edward Young Retired

    After you make that expensive repair and you still have the same problem, What will you check next?