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Condensate pump vent device

Zoso
Zoso Member Posts: 31
Can anyone tell me what this device is? Sorry for the poor photo with all the extra garbage. what you see is part of a steam condensate pump receiver. The condensate line in coming in the back. The pump and discharge can't be seen in the photo. The silver device is connected to the vent on top of the receiver.

This is a vacuum return system. The pump in the photo does not have vacuum, but the main return pump in the boiler room does. So I am assuming that this device is designed to not break the vacuum.

Ultimately, I am replacing this condensate pump and don't know what to do with the vent connection on my new pump receiver.

Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 12,620
    looks like a y strainer. i would pm @Pumpguy he is the vacuum pump expert
  • Zoso
    Zoso Member Posts: 31
    Thank you but I am not referring to the strainer on the condensate return pipe. I am talking about that little silver device on top of the tank.
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 566
    Most common use of wye strainers on condensate pumps is at the return line's inlet to the pump's receiving tank. You might want to pull the screen to be sure its clear and not clogged with debris.

    If the strainer is at a different location, I would need better pictures to comment further.

    For a condensate pump set on a vacuum return system, you want to be sure the tank vent is piped back to a vacuum return line, and not just to atmosphere.

    Venting the tank back to a vacuum return line will apply a vacuum to the return lines that drain into this tank too, so the whole return system will have the advantage of the applied vacuum.

    The attached file shows the correct piping arrangement. Of course it goes without saying the condensate pump's tank and float switch should be air tight with no openings to atmosphere.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.
  • Zoso
    Zoso Member Posts: 31
    Thank you @Pumpguy I will pipe the new one that way. What do you think that little silver device is? I know the photo is not great.
  • Pumpguy
    Pumpguy Member Posts: 566
    edited September 29
    Zoso said:

    Thank you @Pumpguy I will pipe the new one that way. What do you think that little silver device is? I know the photo is not great.

    I do not recognize that device. Possibly a vent of some sort, but without better photo I can't tell.

    Now, if its open to atmosphere in any way, it should be removed and a pressure vent check valve be installed instead.
    Dennis Pataki. Former Service Manager and Heating Pump Product Manager for Nash Engineering Company. Phone: 1-888 853 9963
    Website: www.nashjenningspumps.com

    The first step in solving any problem is TO IDENTIFY THE PROBLEM.