Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

Anyone ever see a storm/downspout like this before?

JakeCK
JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
I've been redoing my front flower beds and this is what is in place where my downspout connection is supposed to be. That corner is all gravel with a broken oversized drain tile. Which suggests someone has dug down and "repaired" something in this corner before. The downspout has never been connected since I've owned the house and instead flows out to the front lawn. That flexible drain got knocked off once and I did end up with a nice little leak in that corner of the basement when half of the roof dumped there.

I'm half tempted to dig down a few feet and find out what has been done to it but I don't want to open a can of worms and being all gravel it'll be a *****.




Comments

  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    I'm specifically asking about the giant drain tile where a 3 or 4 inch drain tile would normally be. Not the running of the downspout out to the yard. I know that is done all the time.
  • bburd
    bburd Member Posts: 483
    edited September 10
    It was typical in older homes for roof drainage to flow through clay tile drain pipes into dry wells, holes filled with rock under the lawn. Over time, the tile pipes frequently become crushed or clogged, leading to rainwater dumping at the foundation line and getting into the basement.

    Someone made a quick and economical fix to get the water away from the foundation. 

    Bburd
    JakeCKSTEVEusaPAHomerJSmith
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    bburd said:
    It was typical in older homes for roof drainage to flow through clay tile drain pipes into dry wells, holes filled with rock under the lawn. Over time, the tile pipes frequently become crushed or clogged, leading to rainwater dumping at the foundation line and getting into the basement.

    Someone made a quick and economical fix to get the water away from the foundation. 

    If this is what this is, it is a bit odd that the front center downspout would have this when the drain for the the rest of the downspouts and below that the footer drain run right under it. 

    The six other downspouts and the driveway have functioning drains. And there is also a separate footer drain tied to the city storms as well. The connection of all of that was actually just repaired when the front porch was. 

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 15,646
    bburd said:

    It was typical in older homes for roof drainage to flow through clay tile drain pipes into dry wells, holes filled with rock under the lawn. Over time, the tile pipes frequently become crushed or clogged, leading to rainwater dumping at the foundation line and getting into the basement.

    Someone made a quick and economical fix to get the water away from the foundation. 
    This only works with sandy soil. If the soil is clay, as in the Baltimore area, such dry wells don't work. Here, the proper procedure is to run your downspout drains to the street.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    All clay here. 
    reggi
  • bburd
    bburd Member Posts: 483
    The common factor in these solutions is the clay tile pipe, not so much what’s at the end. It is usually the pipe that gives trouble.

    Bburd
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 6,637
    edited September 10
    in ann arbor it is common in houses built before the municipal water system to have cisterns that drain tiles from the downspouts drain in to. i suspect that is the top of the cistern. there usually will be pipes in the basement from the cistern to allow you to take water out of it for things like laundry, Usually you see them with a 3 ft or so round stone cover on them.
    PC7060JakeCK
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 831
    What @mattmia2 said, we had one at the old Victorian I grew up in. Most got filled in the 50s / 60s / 70s. 
    mattmia2
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    No evidence in the basement of such pipes. No patches, or areas of replaced brick that stands out other than where the water line was replaced. But I can't rule this out though. The Parma reservoir wasn't built until 1934, my house was built in 28'. I do know the water line into the house has been replaced at least once. The last time was when they smashed all of the storm sewer connections. We found a brick and a 2x1 in the lateral. Yes a full intact brick and a piece of lumber was shoved into my storm lateral. That is all fixed now.

    How big were these cisterns? 
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    And the reservoir is actually right across the street from me. 
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 6,637
    I don't know how deep they were but they were usually around 3 ft in diameter.

    I have also seen cleanouts for sewer laterals that were like that where a piece of sewer tile was at ground level and a concrete or stone cap was set in the hub. Could have been part of a septic system too.
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    Clean out is at the side walk for both the sanitary and storm and have a concrete cap. Sanitary is 4" and the storm is a 6". House never had a septic. sewer's were laid out in the early 20's.
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 831
    edited September 11
    The cistern we had was 6’ deep by 4’ square. All brick construction. 
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 6,637
    This is a cistern that it looks like someone didn't know was there when they started digging up a driveway:


    JakeCK
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 1,045
    Oops.