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T-Drill

Tom_133
Tom_133 Member Posts: 773
Hey All,

So for a while now Ive wanted a T-drill something like a T-60 for copper. Not for a specific job but more for use on custom headers, and when I have time to make a really nice header for a job. I am having a hard time justifying the used price on eBay. Anyone out there have one that can help me to see the benefit and cost savings? Or of course the adverse side of it, anybody out there that will say dont do it.
Tom
Montpelier Vt

Comments

  • kcopp
    kcopp Member Posts: 3,830
    edited November 24
    @hot_rod The person to ask...
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,066
    I bought one new, many years ago, and a second larger set at a pawn shop for $300 bucks. So the cost balanced out :)
    You use them a lot when you first own one, it is a bit time consuming. We did copper fire protection systems with it and it easily paid for itself.
    We also made manifolds and primary secondary connection with it.

    Pretty tough to make manifolds as nice as the ones build on the big automated T-drill machines.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 508
    Nice tool. The well used one I found was still $4k! I see the new T-65 is around $9000.  You’d have to run a lot of custom T to make that pay.  
    Mosherd1
  • offdutytech
    offdutytech Member Posts: 37
    They are a great tool! It's the investment vs payback that's the big question for such a specialized tool. Unless you can carry the cost in jobs or have a side gig making headers the payback is going to be long. Pro press for example pays for its self rather quickly after the upfront investment. 
  • Tom_133
    Tom_133 Member Posts: 773
    Thanks for the thoughts. It seems you all are saying what my wallet is telling my brain, hold off. The reality is if it was a bit more cost effective I would do it for the enjoyment, but as was noted even the used ones are pricey. Well, if anyone has a nice setup they want to sell hit me up.
    Tom
    Montpelier Vt
  • GW
    GW Member Posts: 4,332
    I thought about this in the past too, I had no idea they were that expensive, wow. I buy 6 foot long, 12 spot headers, Alberta Tee, from our local vendor. 2”x1”. The costs are higher than if I were to buy the fittings, but the look is so crisp and clean, just beautiful. I will definitely keep on buying pre made tees. even if I bought that machine, we still have to drill it and braze the stubs and buy the copper! 
    Gary Wilson
    Wilson Services, Inc
    Northampton, MA
    [email protected]
    PC7060
  • Larry Weingarten
    Larry Weingarten Member Posts: 2,295
    edited November 24
    Hi, REMS makes a similar, hand powered tool for a lot less money. It's the REMS 151005. https://remstoolsusa.com/tools/

    Yours, Larry
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 508
    @Larry Weingarten - good suggestion for the one or two specialty jobs per year.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,066
    I have one of these REMS tools, it will pull and expand up to 7/8". An affordable way to get into t pulling in small sizes. Remove the adapter and install a chuck for another drill motor :)
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 15,066
    GW said:

    I thought about this in the past too, I had no idea they were that expensive, wow. I buy 6 foot long, 12 spot headers, Alberta Tee, from our local vendor. 2”x1”. The costs are higher than if I were to buy the fittings, but the look is so crisp and clean, just beautiful. I will definitely keep on buying pre made tees. even if I bought that machine, we still have to drill it and braze the stubs and buy the copper! 

    PPP up in Oregon makes manifolds also. I see them on wholesalers shelves across the country.

    Sioux Chief bought some of the Watts radiant machines when they closed the Springfield shop, they offer copper headers also.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    GW
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,001
    So I am looking at Larry's "Rems" tools, is there any other use for the "dimpling pliers"?

    Somehow I have ended up with a couple of pairs of them from some auction in the last 30 years or so. I can't imagine whoever had that auction would of had a T-drill machine.

    So I need to know what else they might be for.
    I can not throw anything away unless I know what it is....and once I know, then well, maybe someone might need that someday.

    I am not clear on how it worked with the T-drill...somehow puts a stop in your tapping to keep your insert pipe from going in too far??
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,374
    @JUGHNE

    I have run into older EMT installs that used indenter type fittings (no set screw). I never saw anyone install any but maybe the tools you have were for that
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 4,008
    Do they still make drive on emt fittings?

    I like that the rems tool also has a power swedging tool.

    Aren't there braze on saddles that do the same thing without special tools?