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Need advice on new circular combustion chamber

kbrisk
kbrisk Member Posts: 4
edited October 9 in Oil Heating
Hi we have an oil boiler that is very old, we recently got hit hard from Hurricane Ida. We had to replace our burner but when my father looked inside the boiler he saw that the previous combustion chamber was broken apart. It has since been removed but now we are trying to build a new combustion chamber.

The previous combustion chamber was made from fire brick I think, it was in a circular shape and had a hole in it for the motor.

We spoke with a boiler parts manufacturer and they recommended we use a lynn mfg product, a timesaver universal combustion chamber. We know we have to cut a hole for the burner tube. Below is the link for the products we got. People at the boiler place thought we had a dry base.


https://www.lynnmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/spec/Specification-Sheet-1013.pdf
https://www.lynnmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/spec/Specification-Sheet-1030.pdf
https://www.lynnmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/spec/Specification-Sheet-1022.pdf


I have included the model information and my dad drew a picture of the specs. If you look at the picture of the empty metal box that is where the old chamber used to sit, it goes pretty deep inside and at the end there is an opening to the top that leads to the tubes.

Do we need to cover the rest of the metal box where the chamber will sit? My dad wants to put the the ceramic board against the door that closes the metal box, he will cut a hole in the ceramic fiber board and match it with the hole for the chamber.

Let me know if you need more pictures.










Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 10,253
    edited October 9
    So it does look like a dry base boiler to me. The boiler (the part that holds water ) sits on top pf a steel base that is 27" long x 15" wide x 17" tall.

    That entire steel base needs to be protected by the flame (hi temp insulation covered by refractory material).

    It's hard to tell without looking at it but my first impression (and I could be wrong) would be to put the lynn chamber in (which is 14" tall) but first cover the floor with 1 layer of 2 1/2" thick insulating fire brick.

    That would bring the top of the chamber about 16 1/2" above the floor close to the 17" you need.

    Then the chamber would need to be backfilled with vermiculite and capped with castable refractory.

    But usually the water leg of the boiler has to be covered the first 3" up so that part I am not clear on by seeing the pictures.

    But the chamber needs to be able to withstand the weight of the back fill and you have a lot of that

    Might be better to use fire brick on this one.

    Maybe you can take some more pictures stand back so we can see. Some pic inside the boiler near the top of the combustion chamber might help.

    Others will comment

    I don't suppose you have a picture of the old chamber??
    kbrisk
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,775
    You received good instructions on installing chamber . You might want to instal a tub chamber in that federal . That is one heavy boiler you have there . It has wet legs . That boiler originally was installed with a rectangle chamber after the boiler was dropped into the basement before the house was built . I have to assume the round chamber was a replacement . What is the firing rate of the boiler and what oil burner is used ?
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
    kbrisk
  • kbrisk
    kbrisk Member Posts: 4
    edited October 9

    Thank you both for your comments. I appreciate it.

    @Big Ed_4

    My dad says the metal around the empty box contains water too. I believe you are correct in that it has 'water legs'. Also as far as he knows that was the original chamber. We just bought a new beckett AFG, firing rate .5 - 3 GHP.


    @EBEBRATT-Ed

    Can you explain these terms further vermiculite, capped with castable refractory, refractory material, and by backfilling you mean pouring on the sides of the chamber?

    According to the instructions of the timesaver they should not be backfilled.

    https://www.lynnmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/instr/Instructions_1007_1009_1011_1013.pdf


    My dad did get pics of the old chamber and I took a picture of ceiling of the metal box and I took one a little far away.






  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,190
    Do you have anyone who can set up the burner properly? 
    Is there a bolted flange or will it sit on a pedestal?
    Will there be any smoke, draft, combustion tests for this project?
  • kbrisk
    kbrisk Member Posts: 4
    HVACNUT said:
    Do you have anyone who can set up the burner properly? 
    Is there a bolted flange or will it sit on a pedestal?
    Will there be any smoke, draft, combustion tests for this project?
    We were going to setup the new burner the same way it was setup before. 

    It sits on cement pedestal. 

    Could we do those ourselves? We didn't have flood insurance because our basement does not flood so we are trying to fix this ourselves without trying to spend too much. 
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,775
    Hmm , Why the reason for lack of back fill . Back filling and capping the chambers would prolong the need of replacing it again ..
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 14,834
    Lynn Timesavers are not designed to be backfilled. Here are the instructions:

    https://www.lynnmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/instr/Instructions_1007_1009_1011_1013.pdf

    If you're worried about the base getting too hot, glue some Kaowool board or blanket to it.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
    kbrisk
  • Big Ed_4
    Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,775
    Well ,hit me in the head again for not reading the instruction sheet :) Now I have to cart the old chamber out :)
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,190
    kbrisk said:
    We were going to setup the new burner the same way it was setup before. 

    I admire your optimism but that's virtually impossible without the proper tools and experience.
    Insertion depth, pitch, static pressure, spray pattern and angle with the new chamber, 0 smoke, proper draft, knowing exact combustion numbers, etc, etc.
    You might finish, say "Gee pop, that flame looks good to me." Two days later your wondering why the CO and or smoke alarm is going off. 
    After the fun stuff you need to do the important stuff.
    Robert O'BrienSTEVEusaPAbburd
  • kbrisk
    kbrisk Member Posts: 4
    edited October 11
    HVACNUT said:


    kbrisk said:

    We were going to setup the new burner the same way it was setup before. 


    I admire your optimism but that's virtually impossible without the proper tools and experience.
    Insertion depth, pitch, static pressure, spray pattern and angle with the new chamber, 0 smoke, proper draft, knowing exact combustion numbers, etc, etc.
    You might finish, say "Gee pop, that flame looks good to me." Two days later your wondering why the CO and or smoke alarm is going off. 
    After the fun stuff you need to do the important stuff.
    Ok. Understood. We were definitely going to make sure it wasn't smoking. We also cleaned to chimney to make sure it wasn't blocked.

    As far as everything else you mentioned, would it pretty much be trial and error to see what works best?
    STEVEusaPA