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Extending basement FHW zone with new loop

mdl
mdl Member Posts: 5
edited June 4 in THE MAIN WALL
I have a contractor renovating part of my basement to make an in-law suite, and had him add two FHW kick heaters to the space, tapping into an existing zone. The plumber did this by tapping into the return pipe for the zone and running a separate loop to the kick heaters, but he didn't put them in series as I expected. Instead, he put two tees into the 3/4" return line and ran 1/2" pipe to and from the kick heaters, in parallel with the original loop.

I don't see how this arrangement is going to work, since there's nothing stopping the water from going straight past the two tees and ignoring the kick heater zone altogether. Am I missing something? I'll add a picture of the two tees in just a minute.

Comments

  • mdl
    mdl Member Posts: 5
    Here's a picture of the new connection to the existing zone. The water flows in from the top right pipe and goes to the top left back to the boiler. The two pipes coming down from the return line are the new ones the plumber added. I don't see any flow restriction in between the two tees, so I don't see how any water is going to choose to go through the new loop.
  • mdl
    mdl Member Posts: 5
    BTW, I can't figure out how to put this post into an appropriate category, so moderators, please move it as appropriate.
  • rx7145
    rx7145 Member Posts: 7
    They look like monoflow tees. They have a scoop inside that directs the water down.  My house uses them a lot.  Not very common now but they work fine.  
  • mdl
    mdl Member Posts: 5
    rx7145 said:

    They look like monoflow tees. They have a scoop inside that directs the water down.  My house uses them a lot.  Not very common now but they work fine.  

    Oh - I've never heard of those before. I will have to look them up. If they have a diverter inside, that would make much more sense than just looking at the pipes without knowing that :smile:

    Thanks!
  • Erin Holohan Haskell
    Erin Holohan Haskell Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 1,642
    mdl said:

    BTW, I can't figure out how to put this post into an appropriate category, so moderators, please move it as appropriate.

    I've moved it. Thanks!
    President
    HeatingHelp.com
  • EdTheHeaterMan
    EdTheHeaterMan Member Posts: 2,221
    Here is a detail on the diverter tee and how it works
    You can find more information in this text
    http://media.blueridgecompany.com/documents/ZoningMadeEasy.pdf
    Mono-flo tee starts on the bottom of page 21.
    Edward Young
    Retired HVAC Contractor from So. Jersey Shore.
    Cleaned & services first oil heating system at age 16
  • Alan Welch
    Alan Welch Member Posts: 255
    You said heaters,  are there more than one? Are they  wired in?  Turn up the thermostat and see if they work.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 9,719
    I can't tell if they are monoflow or not. If they are you might be ok
    mattmia2
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 3,693
    Might being the operative word since the water is cooler on the returns and those kickspace heaters don't have a whole lot of output and they have less output with cooler water and a monoflow tee may or may not give you enough flow in that application.
  • mdl
    mdl Member Posts: 5
    I asked the plumber, and while they're not monoflo brand tees, the principle is the same. These tees have a flow restrictor in them so that the straight-through path doesn't get all the water flow, which pushes about half of the flow down into the new loop. Thanks for the tip!