Welcome! Here are the website rules, as well as some tips for using this forum.
Need to contact us? Visit https://heatinghelp.com/contact-us/.
Click here to Find a Contractor in your area.

Upgrade old furnace burner to Beckett

Options
artm
artm Member Posts: 12
I have an old furnace and would like to upgrade its burner to a newer Beckett, as I have in another furnace.

I have pics below of the old and new furnace/burner. I have been told that a Beckett AFG (like the one on the newer furnace) will work fine on the old furnace, with some work required at the mating flange (?).

I would prefer a used burner. I do NOT want to replace the old furnace as it's been working fine and I only intend to keep the building for a few more years before a major rehab. The old burner has been working fine with the usual maintenance. But, it must be terribly inefficient and may scare off future tenants when they ask about the oil usage.

Can anyone advise on this course of action? What burner should I look for? I'd like to stick with a familiar burner, like the other Beckett I have. Would I need a permit? Would a plumber even take on such a job?

Here are pics of the newer burner:
https://www.px625.com/temp/35-2-burner/

Here are pics of the older burner:
https://www.px625.com/temp/35-3-burner/

Any help appreciated.

Comments

  • SuperTech
    SuperTech Member Posts: 2,184
    Options
    That picture of the "newer" burner is of something that I consider outdated.  You could keep the burner chassis and update the oil pump to one with a solenoid valve and modern primary control with a 15 second trial for ignition.  The AFG could be used, you may have to replace the combination air tube/nozzle line assembly and mounting flange. It's not something that should be attempted DIY. Honestly the condition of the entire heating system needs to be professionally evaluated to determine wether its safe to operate and worth the effort of installing a new burner.  
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 5,861
    Options
    If the furnace has a steel chamber then you can't use a high static pressure retention head burner. 
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,735
    Options
    Is that picture just the tip of the gravity furnace iceberg?
  • artm
    artm Member Posts: 12
    Options
    Obviously, I don't much about these systems, so bear with me while I try not to sound foolish.

    I suggested this AFG as I have one already, am somewhat familiar with its operation and the oil tech said it should work fine. They're also readily available on the used market - if I'm allowed to do that. Yes, the system is very old but it has been working fine, mostly. If I must replace the furnace as well, and can't go with used parts, then I may as well convert to gas - there's already gas in the building. I would like to see if I can do it the cheapest way for now - replacing the burner.

    steel chamber: the inside is lined with bricks, right in front of the hole. A "repair" was once done as a couple of the bricks had fallen and blocked the flame. So, does this make it a steel chamber or do I look elsewhere? If I need to explore, I'll wait until the summer to do so.

    gravity furnace iceberg: ??? That doesn't sound good...explain.
  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,888
    edited March 2021
    Options
    Is the Syncromatic unit a "furnace" as in hot-air heat, or a "boiler" as in steam or hot-water heat?

    If there are bricks or similar material lining the firebox, it's not a stainless-steel one.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • artm
    artm Member Posts: 12
    Options
    It's a furnace. It's an oldie. When I purcashed the building in 2014, the existing oil company looked into its history and commented that they had never had an issue with it, just periodic maintenance. If it can get me through the next five years or so, that's the goal.
  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,735
    Options
    There are also gas power burners that can in most cases replace the oil burner. If you planned the gas line for post renovation needs you could re-use that with the new heating equipment.

    It looks like the furnace is quite large beyond the pictures of the burner area which is why i asked if it was a gravity furnace from the end of their run around the late 30's to 40's. If it is a gravity furnace, you need someone who really knows how to set up a burner in a gravity furnace to do the swap.

    Given how old and neglected that burner and furnace look, I would recommend replacing the controls along with the burner for safety reasons and it really all should be new.
  • artm
    artm Member Posts: 12
    Options
    Yes, the furnace is large: about 5x4x5-ft, LWH. I just looked up gravity fed and it does not appear to be that. There is a blower in the furnace that pushes air up the vents. Rather, it may be pulling air down through the intake vent in the unit. Still gravity fed?

    It may appear neglected, along with the burner, but they really are not. They do get their periodic service and no tech has commented on a NEED for replacement. I have never had to do anything to the furnace, except change filters. Ony the burner has required parts replaced: nozzle, transformer, electrodes. That's it since 2014.

    Yes, I am aware of the gas powered burners. When it's time to renovate, I would need a modern system with AC so very unlikely that I can reuse it.

  • mattmia2
    mattmia2 Member Posts: 9,735
    Options
    You wouldn't be able to reuse the power burner but you could reuse the gas piping to it. Depending on relative fuel costs that could be a reasonable option.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,612
    Options
    @artm
    if your technician can find you a good used Carlin or Beckett burner then change the old burner out
  • artm
    artm Member Posts: 12
    Options
    Yes, that's my hope. So, can we confirm what Beckett model to use? I don't need the latest and greatest. The AFG shown in the newer furnace is fine with me - if it's suitable. I see them available on the used market all the time and they're simple enough where I can deal with them if they act up.
  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 5,861
    Options
    The firing rate for the Jimi burner (thanks @STEVEusaPA) is 1.00 GPH. The AFG pump is set to 140 psi (verify) so no larger than a .85 nozzle in the AFG. 
    With a retention head, you might need to downfire anyway if there's impingement on the target wall. 
    Even though it's just a work shop, and it's only "temporary", because there's so many variables, you'll still want combustion, smoke, and draft tests done. I don't wanna hear, " The flame looks good enough to me".
    Also put the Carlin primary on the AFG and toss the 8184G.
    STEVEusaPASuperTech