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Schedule 40 VS Schedule DWV - UPC 2015

maine_way
maine_way Member Posts: 20
Hello,

I am unclear about the standard of pipe I need to use for my DWV (sanitary drainage for a 2-unit) application to meet UPC 2015. TABLE 701.2 refers to Schedule 40, whereas pipe and fittings have different requirements in terms of standards. Fittings that I can buy from big box stores are marked DWV, but not marked schedule 40. Yet, they are used by plumbers and DIYers alike and seem to be the right fitting. Furthermore, they are listed as schedule 40 on some web sites, despite no marking on the fitting as such.

My interpretation is that if the fitting meets ASTM D 2665 then it meets code, and does not need to be marked schedule 40.

Whereas pipe meets ASTM D 1785 and IS marked schedule 40.

I am over-thinking here? I do want to be sure code inspection does not identify wrong fittings!

in a head spin,

Shawn

Comments

  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 13,113
    Use fittings marked DWV and pipe marked DWV
    maine_way
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,195
    edited February 2021
    Cellular core PVC is most common for DWV. Lighter, easier to work with.
    Venting some boilers requires solid core or CPVC.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 912
    hot_rod said:
    Cellular core PVC is most common for DWV. Lighter, easier to work with. Venting some boilers requires solid core or CPVC.
    The cellular core is also a good bit noisier for drain lines than the solid type. A bit of forward planning and work is need if you don’t want to hear “water events” throughout your house. 
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 18,195
    PC7060 said:


    hot_rod said:

    Cellular core PVC is most common for DWV. Lighter, easier to work with.
    Venting some boilers requires solid core or CPVC.

    The cellular core is also a good bit noisier for drain lines than the solid type. A bit of forward planning and work is need if you don’t want to hear “water events” throughout your house. 

    We used cast iron for any 3" vertical piping within a home.

    The other key is to always put 3" DWV in a 6" plumbing wall. If it touches the framing or sheetrock it can be really noisy.
    One inspector was adamant about seeing a labeled "transition" band used on the plastic to cast connection, not a standard no-hub band.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
  • PC7060
    PC7060 Member Posts: 912
    edited February 2021
    “The other key is to always put 3" DWV in a 6" plumbing wall. If it touches the framing or sheetrock it can be really noisy”
    @hot_rod - agree, recently used the PVC horizontally in 2x6 wall and packed bay with Roxol Safe and Sound.   Also put under key horizon line to quiet drain, terlet and tub especially. 
    You can still hear the vertical drains, but about at same level as CI. Horizontal are very quiet. $100 well spent

  • delta T
    delta T Member Posts: 871
    the DWV fittings at the vast majority of box stores will be sch 40. There is SDR35 which is a thin wall pipe approved for buried service lines, but not for indoor plumbing afaik. SDR35 is very thin (maybe 3/32") compared with sch 40. You will know the difference. If it is labeled DWV you should be fine.