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How to pipe to radiators or baseboard in basement

ewangewang Member Posts: 42
edited August 11 in Radiant Heating

In the process of renovating and installing hydronic heat in my basement, which didn't have any heat prior.

For all of the other rooms (bedroom, laundry, bathroom) a single radiator or baseboard should be sufficient per load calcs, but in the family room (pictured) I think I would want a radiator/baseboard underneath each window.

The bare walls shown, I plan on framing out with 2x4 walls, with some foam insulation against the block. Question is, what is the best to plumb to the radiators/baseboard with PEX? Along the wall (Red) or coming down from the ceiling (blue)?

Required BTU at DD is about 13,000 BTU and I'd prefer to size at 140*F to ensure condensing on my new Evergreen 70. Load for the remaining rooms are about 12k BTU.

Comments

  • Big Ed_4Big Ed_4 Member Posts: 1,486
    edited August 11
    You really don't want to run a heating pipe filled with water in an outside wall . I assume your running a 3/4" pipe on a baseboard loop . For radiators you want to use diverters and risers . I would either box or bury the 3/4" pex and use 3/4x1/2x1/2 tees spaced the length of the radiator , 1/2" between the tees's and 1/2" used as the risers up into the radiators .
    I have enough experience to know , that I dont know it all
  • ewangewang Member Posts: 42
    Thanks Big Ed_4, but what do you mean by "box or bury?
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,543
    I agree with @Big Ed_4 about pipe in the ceiling and stay out of the walls as much as possible.

    Box or bury means box the pipe in with something like build a soffett around the pipe....a wooden chase bury is put it inside the ceiling

    If it was me I would box the pipe in and stay out of the walls and run in the ceiling. You could run both the supply and return in 1 chase and run both pipes around the room inside the baseboard enclosure (using dummy enclosure) if you don't mind the way it looks
  • ewangewang Member Posts: 42
    Glad I asked, since I was sure people would tell me the walls were a no brainer!

    Would a home run + manifold + TRV + PropPressureCirc be overkill? With the T's, I'm a little worried about balancing.
  • EBEBRATT-EdEBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 7,543
    For just those 3 radiators with a total of 13000 btu I would make it a series loop it's all in one room and close coupled. I would run 3/4" you close to the limit of 1/2"
  • STEVEusaPASTEVEusaPA Member Posts: 4,535
    edited August 11
    Looks like a candidate for radiant in the ceiling?
    steve
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 14,075
    As an example with Slantfin 30, you would need about 40- 50 feet of board at 140F. Do you have wall space for that?
    Figure 145 SWT, 20 ∆, 125 RWT so average 135 temperature to size by.

    Or look at some of the high output boards, or panel rads.
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
  • ewangewang Member Posts: 42
    I'll be doing staple up with plates in the ceiling for the upstairs. And many of the rooms in the basement make it unfeasible for radiant ceiling, so I thought I would stick with baseboard/radiators for the basement floor.
  • ewangewang Member Posts: 42
    hot_rod said:

    As an example with Slantfin 30, you would need about 40- 50 feet of board at 140F. Do you have wall space for that?

    I was planning on SlantFin at first, but was reading about the benefits of radiators and their thermal storage to prevent short cycling. With my basement load of ~23k BTU and my EG-70's 5:1 turndown, I thought radiators might be a better fit.
  • hot_rodhot_rod Member Posts: 14,075
    ewang said:

    hot_rod said:

    As an example with Slantfin 30, you would need about 40- 50 feet of board at 140F. Do you have wall space for that?

    I was planning on SlantFin at first, but was reading about the benefits of radiators and their thermal storage to prevent short cycling. With my basement load of ~23k BTU and my EG-70's 5:1 turndown, I thought radiators might be a better fit.
    Pros and cons to all the different type of emitters. Panel rads are also nice, a mid mass system between radiant slabs and fin tube.
    Cast iron rads with TRVs, pipe exposed from ceiling? Get some brass or copper and shine it up.

    If you want to operate on design days with low temperatures, you need lots of surface area on radiant emitters. Lots of baseboard, or forced convection like kick or wall heaters.

    Some good formulas here for different type of emitters at low SWT
    https://www.caleffi.com/sites/default/files/file/idronics_25_na.pdf
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    The magic is in hydronics, and hydronics is in me
    ewang
  • ewangewang Member Posts: 42
    Alright, I think I got this figured out on how I'm going to pipe to the panel radiators in this situation. I read through a lot of threads on where to run piping, the dangers of freezing if pex is in an exterior wall, the issues with glycol and exhausted all options on good-looking boxed out piping chases.

    I think what I'm going to do is build out a 24" wide wall inbetween the windows to act as a piping chase, that will have R15+ insulation between itself and the outdoors. Inside the chase, I'll have a tee to branch off to either panel radiator, each equipped with a TRV.


    I think I like this plan the best as it gets some heat on the cold side of the room and I won't be burying any pipes in a cold, exterior wall.

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