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Return Manifolds

Hi guys, trying to settle a dispute and could use some input. When replacing a boiler alot of times in older homes there will be split returns that has 2 returns teed together right above circulator/zone valve. The way I have liked to pipe my return manifold is with a central purge station and I will seperate the tee and drop them both directly down into my manifold with of course ball valves on both. I have done this for years never with any flow problems. I recently had a coworker tell me that he read this is wrong and can cause issues?? would love to get some feedback! thanks!

Comments

  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,301
    Why would it cause issues? If anything you could also put in circuit setters and balance the split loop better. Plus with the right valve combo, or a Webstone iso/boiler drain, you can easily isolate each split for quicker/better purging.
    Hopefully you're putting your circs on the supply and pumping away from the expansion tank...

    steve
  • Pipeslinger81
    Pipeslinger81 Member Posts: 4
    edited September 2019
    yes, of course. always pump away. as far as the webstone Iso's I have used those as well. And I'm still waiting for an explanation from him as to how this will affect flow.
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,301
    edited September 2019
    You probably won't get a good explanation (regarding flow), but if you get one, let us know...

    Sometimes when you bump up against wrong or old-school thinking (happened a lot with my father) if you explain it to them, and they don't get it (refuse to get it), just agree with them and do it your own (better) way.

    Probably the main reason for not splitting it was to save pipe, a component, and time. Plus, if you are using zone valves (or circs), you have to run one zone with one control, then split the loop (or you've made another zone).
    Whether it's split or not, if you have multiple zones, they common together at some point to go thru the boiler, right?

    ---
    I even had an old timer (try to) argue with me at the supply house that when you open a barometric damper, it increases the draft over the fire. So how do you change that thinking?
    steve
  • JakeCK
    JakeCK Member Posts: 378
    > @STEVEusaPA said:
    > I even had an old timer (try to) argue with me at the supply house that when you open a barometric damper, it increases the draft over the fire. So how do you change that thinking?

    Was this an actual professional? That scares the living $*** out of me as a homeowner. That goes against the very intent of a barometric damper or hood. :s I understand this even as a novice.
  • Alan (California Radiant) Forbes
    Alan (California Radiant) Forbes Member Posts: 2,965
    edited September 2019
    Stick to your guns. That's the way I do it and it makes air purging easy. No drawbacks.
    Often wrong, never in doubt.
  • Pipeslinger81
    Pipeslinger81 Member Posts: 4
    edited September 2019
    @STEVEusaPA So this is my explanation (see screenshot)...so basically I'm told it can back feed through another zone, makes zero sense to me whatsoever and have never heard of such a thing. pressure differential? closed system should have no pressure differential. and there are flow checks/zone valves. thoughts?
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,301
    edited September 2019
    Nonsense. It's a closed system, like you said. You may need circuit setters or valves to balance the split loads for even coverage per each zone, but one has nothing to do with the other if like I said earlier, you feed each zone with one pipe then split after the check or zone valve.


    Show him either one of Dan's books, or Siggy's book and have him find that. Caleffi also have their Idronics series (online) so have him waste his time looking for proof to his theory.

    Or have him pipe it up with clear pipe and prove it to you, with a friendly wager attached.

    Or have him come here and state his case :)

    If your common pipe is sized (or oversized) to match all the btu's needed/produced, there won't be any issues.
    steve
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,301
    @JakeCK
    By 'professional' if you mean someone who gets paid for their work, then yes, in the narrowest sense of the definition.
    You should be scared. Lots of hacks out there. That's why I play dumb in the supply houses when asked questions. Then go back into my truck and laugh.
    @Pipeslinger81
    Like Alan said, stick to your guns...
    steve