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Why you should never dead-head a circulator

HeatingHelp
HeatingHelp Posts: 493
edited August 2019 in THE MAIN WALL
Why you should never dead-head a circulator

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Comments

  • Charlie from wmass
    Charlie from wmass Member Posts: 4,244
    I very much enjoyed the article well written and informative as always. But every time I read the word pump I had to chuckle.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
  • Nimrod66
    Nimrod66 Member Posts: 16
    This may be a stupid question, but in the formula for the 40 HP circulator, 20 BHP is used. How did 40 HP become 20 BHP? It looks like it has something to do with "(at shut off)". I don't know how to figure the difference.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,180
    It’s Break Horse Power. We get that from the pump curve.
    Retired and loving it.
    Hammer
  • Hammer
    Hammer Member Posts: 14
    I think your spell check corrected your 'brake' to 'break', Dan....lol. As I recall my mech eng classes, it was called 'brake' horsepower b/c they applied a Prony brake to the end of the crankshaft on an engine to load up the engine and measure the output torque and then convert it to net output hp at the end of the shaft.
  • Charlie from wmass
    Charlie from wmass Member Posts: 4,244
    A pony brake.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
  • Nimrod66
    Nimrod66 Member Posts: 16
    If I understand correctly, HP typically includes losses created before the point of use, for instance within a transmission or gearbox, whereas BHP is measured at the output shaft of the engine or motor.
    Hammer
  • Hammer
    Hammer Member Posts: 14
    Nimrod66 said:

    If I understand correctly, HP typically includes losses created before the point of use, for instance within a transmission or gearbox, whereas BHP is measured at the output shaft of the engine or motor.

    That is exactly correct.
  • Hammer
    Hammer Member Posts: 14

    A pony brake.

    Actually, no, I believe it is "Prony" as in, Gaspard de Prony.......the guy that came up w/ the idea to apply a load to measure ouput torque. I believe it was the precursor to the dynamometer. When James Watt was coming up w/ the concept of "horsepower" he compared the lifting power of both horses and ponies, so maybe that's what you were thinking.
  • Charlie from wmass
    Charlie from wmass Member Posts: 4,244
    Since I am from Massachusetts I will use the excuse we don't have Rs up here. I can take the rest of the day off I have learned something new thank you.
    Cost is what you spend , value is what you get.

    cell # 413-841-6726
    https://heatinghelp.com/find-a-contractor/detail/charles-garrity-plumbing-and-heating
    Solid_Fuel_Man