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Radiator capacity/square footage

JohnStarcher
JohnStarcher Member Posts: 10


I have looked through my E.D.R. book cover to cover, and cannot find this radiator. I need to determine it's output capacity. Anyone have any clue?

Comments

  • JohnStarcher
    JohnStarcher Member Posts: 10
    It is approximately 19.5" tall, 5" deep, and 22" wide
  • MikeT_Swampeast_MO
    MikeT_Swampeast_MO Member Posts: 27
    Don't have my copy of E.D.R. handy right now but I'd say it's very fair to say it is similar to other convector-type units of about the same physical size.

    Don't forget that the "heating capacity" or "square footage [that can be heated by]" of a radiator/convector is all about how much heat that space requires!

    Are you embarking on a bathroom expansion/remodel and wanting to use that convector? If so and if the bath is already comfortable and heat is even (well--baths often have intentionally oversized convectors to keep them relatively warmer) you will have a problem if you add a significant amount of exterior wall and/or windows to the room. You can though reduce that problem by, if possible, insulating significantly better than the spaces surrounding.
  • Rich_49
    Rich_49 Member Posts: 2,709
    You didn't get what you didn't pay for and it will never be what you thought it would .
    Langans Plumbing & Heating LLC
    732-751-1560
    Serving most of New Jersey, Eastern Pa .
    Consultation, Design & Installation anywhere
    Rich McGrath 732-581-3833
    JohnStarcher
  • Danny Scully
    Danny Scully Member Posts: 1,396
    I would say it’s about 22 sqft.
    JohnStarcher
  • JohnStarcher
    JohnStarcher Member Posts: 10
    Thanks guys. Rich - that link is helpful. MikeT - this job was a freeze-up. Boiler is ancient, and now dead, and we’re trying to give the owner his best options. I ran a load calc and am comparing the calculated loads to the available radiation to determine if it’s adequate. House is typically unoccupied in the winter (it’s used as a bed & breakfast during tourist season) so comfort has never really been a major concern during the coldest part of winter. Sale is imminent and the buyer will most likely occupy it year round so we’re making sure all options are being explored. Second floor radiators escaped freeze damage, probably because the lower level froze first, water was turned off at the valve in the main water line and I’m assuming the system depressurized once the lower level rads broke, at least enough that the upper level rads were spared.
  • MikeT_Swampeast_MO
    MikeT_Swampeast_MO Member Posts: 27
    Yes, definitely check against the existing radiation as what's there is likely highly oversized.

    Look into TRVs for the radiators. Perfect fit with a B&B as you get individual temperature control in every room. They'll also compensate for rather imbalanced radiation in the event you have a hard time finding the same sized replacements. With the work you'll be doing to repair a system with significant freeze damage--I know that one well--the cost of the TRVs is extremely reasonable.

    TRVs on standing iron with a modern mod-con boiler are a match from heaven--superb comfort and wildly lower fuel consumption.