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Need flue collector for American Standard GPH

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JimMorse
JimMorse Member Posts: 5
edited November 2018 in THE MAIN WALL
I have an "older" American Standard GPH boiler. The sheet metal part - "flue collector" - that collects the burned gas above the heat exchanger - it has holes in it, I patched it once with furnace cement but that was 5 years ago and there's about no metal left in some places. I guess the exhaust has no where to go really except up the flue but I imagine eventually it will burn through the top cover and I don't want that. I'm thinking the part is perhaps called a plenum or collector - it is a rectangular kind of pyramid shape that hooks to the flue (flue sets down in it). I sure would appreciate any help where I could get this part. I suppose I could rivet some sheet metal on it but it's in such poor shape I'd really like to just replace it. Also if anyone has an idea the year of this boiler I'd be interested. I'm guessing sixties, but I don't know. I can't find any model or serial on it but maybe I'm not looking in the right place.

Side info - it soots up (took 5 years), I am guessing that is normal. I replaced the drain valve, pressure gage, and thermocouple when I moved in here to get the thing going. It's been great, very reliable. I also adjusted the hi/lo for the circulating pump and it goes on at 145 and off at 115 which seems about perfect for my setup. If it's set too high only part of the house heats well, so I lowered it considerably from where it had been set. I can't see any reason to replace the boiler for just this one part, the rest of it seems fine and as long as the heat exchanger doesn't leak, just about everything else can be replaced with parts, I think. It runs around 10 on the pressure so that seems fine. I really know nothing about them except from working on this one. I would much appreciate any help.

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  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,899
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    You're talking about the "Flue Collector". Not sure how old this thing is, but if you can't get a replacement, it's time for a new boiler.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting
  • JimMorse
    JimMorse Member Posts: 5
    edited November 2018
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    With all respect, why would I need a new boiler if it is just one part that is bad? I understand newer is more efficient and newer is nice, but otherwise, especially if money is in issue (it is) then I'm hesitant to replace the whole thing because of a bad flue collector.

    I imagine it's from the sixties but I'm just guessing. The house was made in 1920 but I think the boiler is not that old.

    I'm hoping to find a supplier somewhere who has these. Or else I guess patch this one with some sheet metal and rivets, but I'd really like to replace it.
  • GBart
    GBart Member Posts: 746
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    American Standard GPH boiler?? Are you sure that's the model #?

    If it's gas it shouldn't ever soot up, something is seriously wrong, at that age the collector is probably not all that's rotten, has anyone had headaches? flu like symptons? etc? You could be getting CO poisoning, best have a pro look at it.
  • JimMorse
    JimMorse Member Posts: 5
    edited November 2018
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    I can't find a model number. Do you know where it might be? If you look for Google images for American Standard GPH boiler you can see them there. Maybe there was only that one type.

    I imagine the burner tubes should be cleaned and I see there is an adjustment at the front of them, however I did not mess with that.

    Getting CO detector tomorrow. Have 2 fire alarms.

    One shouldn't get CO unless there's incomplete combustion - we use gas stove inside all the time - however that boiler at probably 50 plus years should have a good going-over besides what I've done already and besides fixing the flue collector - doesn't look like there are tons of parts around. An old one would probably have the same issue.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 11,076
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    Do you have a picture of this collector box?
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,624
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    Take the flue collector box off the boiler. Ask around for a good sheet metal fabricator in your area and bring it to them. They can copy it, they do it all the time.

    You don't want someone who only does duct work. A fabricator who can bend & weld etc is what you need


    The boiler is too old you won't be able to buy one. Make sure it is sealed properly when reinstalled on the boiler.
    STEVEusaPA
  • JimMorse
    JimMorse Member Posts: 5
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    Thank you very much Ed. I'll do like you say. I'll probably see if I can find suitable gasket material and replace that as well. The holes for the bolts that hold it in might be a little questionable, but I could probably thread them out carefully just a tad bigger, that's nothing critical, so long as they hold nicely.

    I appreciate the help.
  • EBEBRATT-Ed
    EBEBRATT-Ed Member Posts: 15,624
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    Red RTV silicone is used for sealing or Kaowool available at a boiler supply house.

    Just make sure the thing is safe to run
  • Tinman
    Tinman Member Posts: 2,808
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    No gas fired appliance should ever soot up, let alone every five years.

    A tinner can easily make whatever you can dream up but it’s going to take a knowledgeable technician to resolve the bad burn.
    Steve Minnich
  • NY_Rob
    NY_Rob Member Posts: 1,370
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    JimMorse said:


    Getting CO detector tomorrow. Have 2 fire alarms.

    One shouldn't get CO unless there's incomplete combustion - we use gas stove inside all the time - however that boiler at probably 50 plus years should have a good going-over besides.

    Jim... there's a huge difference between a 8K BTU gas stove burner running for 30min and a 80-100K(?) 50yo boiler (with admittedly bad exhausting) running for hours at a time. I don't know of anyone dying from using a stove for cooking purposes, but there are many tragic instances of people/whole families dying from leaking boilers/furnaces.

    There is no such thing as 100% complete combustion... even the most modern/efficient mod-con boilers put out up to 175ppm or more CO per factory spec... and your 50+ yo boiler that's rusting out and sooting up is far from new/factory condition.

    You can do yourself a favor and get a CO alarm that has a real readout vs. just a flashing red light and horn.

    If you really want to be safe and sleep well at night, spend $160 and get a Sensorcon Inspector CO Tester/Meter and check out your basement and area near your boiler and exhaust ducting while the boiler's running.

    If after repairs you still get CO in the basement... time to invest in new equipment.

  • Steamhead
    Steamhead Member Posts: 16,899
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    NY_Rob said:

    I don't know of anyone dying from using a stove for cooking purposes, but there are many tragic instances of people/whole families dying from leaking boilers/furnaces.

    I've found readings over 2500 PPM CO from residential gas ovens. In each case the burner was way out of adjustment. And remember, a lot of these ovens exhaust right into the room, so CO poisoning is quite possible.
    All Steamed Up, Inc.
    Towson, MD, USA
    Steam, Vapor & Hot-Water Heating Specialists
    Oil & Gas Burner Service
    Consulting