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Improving circulator efficiency

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hot_rod
hot_rod Member Posts: 22,258
Squirt this abrasive goo thru the volute to polish them up.

Wish I had this stuff in my go-kart and snowmobile days. We ported and polished two strokes with emery and steel wool, sort of.
Bob "hot rod" Rohr
trainer for Caleffi NA
Living the hydronic dream

Comments

  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
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    I’ve seen that stuff. Cleans manifolds etc. pretty slick idea. No pun intended.
  • Gilmorrie
    Gilmorrie Member Posts: 185
    edited October 2018
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    A typical circulator pump is very efficient - maybe 90%. The 10% efficiency loss becomes heat, which adds to the heating system's supply. The motor has additional inefficiencies, of course.

    The hydronic pump impellers I've inspected are usually clean and smooth. Many modern impellers are bronze, nylon, or plastic. I'm unsure what this product would do to improve pump efficiency.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,258
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    I've read typical wet rotor PSC circulators that we are familiar with run in the mid 20% efficiencies. That is IF they are running mid curve. When I see a job with a wall of circs, one wonders how many are running mid curve? Some probably running in the 10% range.

    Electric motor technology ECM, is about as efficient as it can get right now, pump manufacturers are looking to keep increasing efficiencies to meet energy standards in Europe, and the hydraulics of the volute may be a place to pick up some gains.

    Seems easy enough to squirt some abrasives thru the volute and get a mirror finish.


    https://www.pmmag.com/articles/90123-the-incredible-shrinking-circulator-br-john-siegenthaler-p-e
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    Rich_49
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    edited October 2018
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    I wonder how that would work smoothing old pipes up? I’m quite sure a lot of psi is needed. Maybe we’ll end up back where we started. Gravity :)
    Rich_49
  • djackman
    djackman Member Posts: 12
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    hot rod said:
    Funny how that article was 11 years+ ago and the plain old fixed speed circ is still the most common. Did the "microcirculator" discussed near the bottom ever go anywhere?
  • Gilmorrie
    Gilmorrie Member Posts: 185
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    "I've read typical wet rotor PSC circulators that we are familiar with run in the mid 20% efficiencies."

    That must be a total misunderstanding or a ridiculous joke. No circulator efficiency could be near that low, even with the motor efficiency. Nonsense.
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
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    Oh it could easily happen with the wrong sized circulator. Like that never happens................
  • Gilmorrie
    Gilmorrie Member Posts: 185
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    No, it couldn't - impossible. Sorry.
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
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    Really?
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,546
    edited October 2018
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    I can tell you a three piece circulator adds about zero heat to the system. It adds it to the space it occupies which is usually not inhabited by only the person who works in the boiler room.

    Even a wet rotor psc does not add all its heat to the system.
  • hot_rod
    hot_rod Member Posts: 22,258
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    The wire to water efficiency, amount of electrical energy required to more the required gpm to the load.

    This example defines a typical circuit, at 5 gpm flow rate, plots it on a common name brand pump curve, establishes the OP and then uses an efficiency curve overlay to show operating efficiency.

    If you have other numbers, show us.


    https://www.pmmag.com/articles/100760-properly-sizing-and-operating-circulators
    Bob "hot rod" Rohr
    trainer for Caleffi NA
    Living the hydronic dream
    RPK