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Radiators not bleeding

Hi,

I was checking my heating system and when I tried to bleed my radiators, a little bit of air came out then nothing.

Isn't there supposed to be water coming out at some point?

Thanks in advance

Comments

  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,509
    turn up the boiler pressure to 14-16# and water should come out.
  • chaznied
    chaznied Member Posts: 39
    Not sure how to do that, I don't see a pressure valve only a water valve into the system, any advise on what to look for?
  • leonz
    leonz Member Posts: 492
    Do you know what kind of heating system you have? Please tell us this first.

    Is the water valve a simple globe valve that rotates fully open or closes with a number turns clockwise or counter clockwise or a ball valve with a flat handle that rotates 90 degrees to fully open or fully close.

    A pressure regulator may be a watts, B+G, taco or some other brand. The pressure regulator is a brass or bronze valve that looks like a cone on top with a small sheet metal handle that is connected to a pin in the center of the cone.
    This little handle is what you turn to increase or decrease the water delivery pressure to the boiler. There should be a painted and stamped tag under this handle that shows the system pressure it is set for.

    Are you trying to bleed the radiators with the boiler off and cold?
    You should be doing this with the boiler running and the water hot.
    If you have only water coming out you do not have an air problem.

  • chaznied
    chaznied Member Posts: 39
    edited October 2018
    Maybe these will help

    #3 is the water valve, it is circular
    #2 is what I think is a release valve
    #1 is what I think is the gas valve





    thank you
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,763
    Your boiler has a gauge on the front of it.
    One needle is showing the water temp.
    The other shows water pressure, it has 2 scales for the other needle, one in PSI with matching altitude in feet. Also is a adjustable pointer showing the max setting for pressure.
    You need 12-15 PSI to raise water up to about 30' of altitude.

    A better picture of your #3 would help.
    Also a picture of your pump, if you have one.
    It is possible a pump is inside the boiler cabinet.
  • chaznied
    chaznied Member Posts: 39


    Thanks Jughne,

    Here's a close up of #3 and the pump must be in the cabinet

    Thanks
    neilc
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,763
    I assume you have a manual fill water valve system.
    The valve with the suitcase tag is closed?? Assuming your boiler is cold/cool and you open that valve to raise the gauge pressure to 12-15 PSI (about 30' altitude) then shut it off. That should put some pressure in the system and the air bleeder valves may pass some water.
    You may have to repeat the fill process to get the water up there.

    More pictures of your pipes connected to the boiler may help.
    You could have a gravity hot water heating system with a boiler of that vintage.
  • chaznied
    chaznied Member Posts: 39
    Hi Jughne,

    You were exactly right, when added water up to 12psi, i got water to bleed out all the way upstairs after repeating a few times. I'm attaching some images anyway since I am obviously oblivious to my heating system. I also noticed when I moved in there was a small handful of matches scattered about the base of the boiler which I assume were to light something under there, any insight to that or would you be able to point me in the direction of something to read or even how to begin a google search? I don't really know what I have so I don't know what to ask as far as a manual goes.

    Thanks again, you've been a ton of help,
    Charles
  • Fred
    Fred Member Posts: 8,518
    Those matches were to light the standing pilot, on the boiler. You really need to familiarize yourself with that boiler before the dead of winter. It is always a good idea to have an annual inspection/cleaning and burner adjustment by a Pro that knows Hot Water systems.
  • ch4man
    ch4man Member Posts: 262
    your boiler scares me.
    the last picture IMG_1975, the run off pipe from the safety relief valve needs to be cut 6-18 inches off the floor now!
    as I see it it is essentially plugged. this is the pipe that appears to be capped at the floor. not good.
    if in fact its piped to some type of drain i still would not trust it.
    i recommend a pro now.

    have a care
  • nicholas bonham-carter
    nicholas bonham-carter Member Posts: 8,564
    Yes, check that the pipe from the pressure release does not have a cap on it and is a few inches from the floor, in case it ever releases the pressure, which could be boiling hot.—NBC
    1Matthias
  • Jaykhjr
    Jaykhjr Member Posts: 10
    Having the same issue with the big brother of your boiler. Going to try to adjust the psi... but to my knowledge, my water supply line is always on/open. my bottom radiators bleed fine, but my top radiators seem to "bounce" air back and forth between them.

    My circulation pump is ancient, that may also be the problem, but I don'




    t know how to check. any help?
  • Paul Pollets
    Paul Pollets Member Posts: 3,509
    Consider modernizing your boiler with a more efficient appliance. It will save money in the long and short term.
    Gordy
  • Jaykhjr
    Jaykhjr Member Posts: 10

    Consider modernizing your boiler with a more efficient appliance. It will save money in the long and short term.

    Thats the plan for next spring, but it doesn't help me this winter.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,763
    Jay, post a picture of your pressure relief, please.

    Is the arrow on your water inlet pressure regulating pointing towards the boiler?
  • Jaykhjr
    Jaykhjr Member Posts: 10
    > @JUGHNE said:
    > Jay, post a picture of your pressure relief, please.
    >
    > Is the arrow on your water inlet pressure regulating pointing towards the boiler?

    Here are pics of that and the pump, yes, arrow pointing towards boiler.
  • JUGHNE
    JUGHNE Member Posts: 9,763
    I don't see a pressure pop off relief valve on the boiler.
    It would resemble the one on your water heater tank, but rated for only 30 PSI of pressure.
    Read farther down on the wall for a posting by BobC entitled: "Boiler Exploded"...…..that probably happened because the pop off valve was gone, rusted shut to never open or the outlet was plugged because it was dripping.
  • Jaykhjr
    Jaykhjr Member Posts: 10
    > @JUGHNE said:
    > I don't see a pressure pop off relief valve on the boiler.
    > It would resemble the one on your water heater tank, but rated for only 30 PSI of pressure.
    > Read farther down on the wall for a posting by BobC entitled: "Boiler Exploded"...…..that probably happened because the pop off valve was gone, rusted shut to never open or the outlet was plugged because it was dripping.

    I'm not home right now, but I'll take another pic. There is a pressure relief valve on the boiler. I havent tested it, but it looks slightly newer, so it was replaced at some point
    JUGHNE
  • Gordy
    Gordy Member Posts: 9,514
    That’s a mess.... seems you have high humidity in the basement.

    That’s a creative, and dangerous scenario. I can’t tell what is going on where the pressure relief valve should exist, but it does not exist. They have piped the make up water, and where does the copper tubing go vertical from the top of the tee at the boiler? Seems to be a pipe headed down to the floor. How does this all work?......
  • Jaykhjr
    Jaykhjr Member Posts: 10
    > @Gordy said:
    > That’s a mess.... seems you have high humidity in the basement.
    >
    > That’s a creative, and dangerous scenario. I can’t tell what is going on where the pressure relief valve should exist, but it does not exist. They have piped the make up water, and where does the copper tubing go vertical from the top of the tee at the boiler? Seems to be a pipe headed down to the floor. How does this all work?......

    If you look at the 4th picture down in my first post, the pressure relief valve is on the rear of the Tee located near the top left back corner of the boiler. The copper piping goes up to the expansion tank, and the other copper run goes to a big radiator with a fan built into it for heating the basement.

    The humidity isnt bad down there, there is a dehumidifier and it floats around 52%. Maybe earlier in the boilers life the humidity was worse