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Plumbing/Leveling Roth Tanks

Atomic1
Atomic1 Member Posts: 11
Looking at replacing my interior 275 gal oil tank and have been kicking around the pros and cons between Roth double wall and Granby single wall tanks. Initially the double wall construction of the Roth seemed like a slam dunk until I started seeing quite a few reports of leaks at the plastic threaded fittings. Upon closer review, it seems like roth tanks have no method to plumb the tank, and this is key for achieving the correct fitment on the threaded connection. I talked with roth and they say that the use of shims voids their warranty. This suggests that Roth tanks can only be put on very level concrete pads and that the top connection of a steel pipe to the poly container is the likely trouble point. Can anyone comment on this logic? I'm surprised I havent seen it mentioned somewhere.

Comments

  • HVACNUT
    HVACNUT Member Posts: 4,871
    I've installed many Roth and Granby tanks. BTW, Granby offers a double wall tank with a leak indicator.
    As far as the Roth is concerned, I'd have to say the poor reviews you've read were due to poor installations, not the tank. The connections at the tank with 2" F adapters need proper setting and tightening but it's not rocket surgery. And just like any tank, the fill and vent need to be supported and secure according to code. No bung on anything should bear the weight of the connected piping.
    Of course you can't shim an oil tank. Your asking for trouble. If the new tank is staying in the basement, and the floors not level, pour a 2" pad. If your installing outside, your local Mason supply should stock pre made 2" pads.
    Just my opinion but... If you choose the Roth, or the Granby and pipe the oil line off the top (1 pipe), install a Tiger Loop Ultra at the burner.
    Grallert
  • Snowmelt
    Snowmelt Member Posts: 1,384
    id agree with hvacnut, my mom has a roth tank for ten years no issues ever.
  • STEVEusaPA
    STEVEusaPA Member Posts: 5,983
    No tank is installed plumb (2 sides) and level. If an installer can't pipe it because it's not perfectly plumb and level, get another installer.
    I'm only looking for flat and able to support the weight, (and of course proper piping technique).
    I never gang the fills together, always pipe separately. No one will ever convince me that both (or more than 2) tanks can fill to the same level, and draw the exact same amount. The slightest vacuum leak (probably unnoticeable with a Tiger Loop installed) will throw the levels off and eventually one will overfill.
    Just make sure it's installed according to the manufacturer's recommendation, and the AHJ. Pre-made pads, concrete lentils are no longer allowed in my neck of the woods, only a poured concrete pad-and 2" over top of an unknown thickness slab may not cut it either.
    steve
  • Robert O'Brien
    Robert O'Brien Member Posts: 3,474
    Steel isn't the best material for tank construction given the fuels of today. Bio, ULS etc. Tanks of inert materials are the way to go.
    To learn more about this professional, click here to visit their ad in Find A Contractor.
    Grallert
  • Atomic1
    Atomic1 Member Posts: 11
    HVACNUT said:


    As far as the Roth is concerned, I'd have to say the poor reviews you've read were due to poor installations, not the tank.

    Of course you can't shim an oil tank. Your asking for trouble. If the new tank is staying in the basement, and the floors not level, pour a 2" pad. If your installing outside, your local Mason supply should stock pre made 2" pads.

    Of course it's installation problems. I have a concrete basement floor that isn't within the 1/2" level that Roth requires to maintain warranty. I got quotes from three certified Roth installers, none of whom brought up the issue. When I did, two of them suggested using shims, and the third said, "yea, a level concrete pad would probably be a good idea", but they dont mess with pouring pads.

    It's a good thing I researched this more. I'm gonna suspect that many Roth installers are winging it and doing it the wrong way and leaving owners hanging without warranty coverage.

    If a Roth is so particular to get it installed correctly, is it going to be safer than a Granby which can be leveled with the adjustable legs?

    It's just annoying that a lot of the literature out there is about how good these double wall tanks are but dont talk about the challenges of install.

  • Atomic1
    Atomic1 Member Posts: 11

    No tank is installed plumb (2 sides) and level. If an installer can't pipe it because it's not perfectly plumb and level, get another installer.
    I'm only looking for flat and able to support the weight, (and of course proper piping technique).

    Roth requires a plumb tank for valid warranty coverage. If the consensus is that the $2million insurance/warranty coverage Roth advertises is going to be invalidated in most cases because its tougher to have a perfect install, I think people should be aware of that.

  • Atomic1
    Atomic1 Member Posts: 11
    For what it's worth, in the past year, I happened to have the opportunity to talk to an environmental remediation company who does oil spill cleanups. Their consensus was that the Roth insurance policy warranty was a little gimmicky due to the likelihood that most installs don't follow all of roths strict requirements to the T. Everything will be scrutinized in the face of a $150,000 cleanup bill.