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TPH

bean
bean Member Posts: 34
What is TPH Stand for in regards to steam consumption & how is it calculated?

Comments

  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    edited June 2018
    Tonnes per hour. It's an industrial term for steam boilers, the amount of steam the boiler can produce in one hour.
    Retired and loving it.
  • bean
    bean Member Posts: 34
    Tonnes per hour, how is that calculated?
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    edited June 2018
    It's given by the boiler manufacturer in the rating of their boiler. It's a measure of the boiler's power. They calculate it for you. It's similar to a space-heating boiler, which the manufacturer rated in pounds of steam per hour.
    Retired and loving it.
  • bean
    bean Member Posts: 34
    I understand the rating but do you know how this is calculated?
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    The boiler-design engineer does it based on surface area internally, I suppose. I don’t know the formula. Sorry.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Gsmith
    Gsmith Member Posts: 431
    Not sure of this, but tonne is a metric ton, 2,2054 US lbs. I believe the rating is the measured ability of the boiler to evaporate X tonnes (2,205 US lbs) of water per hour. 2205 lbs of water is about 265 gallons, they probably measure how many gallons of water are evaporated when the boiler is running and convert to metric tons.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    That's correct, Gary, but I think he's trying to find out HOW they come up with it during design.
    Retired and loving it.
  • Gsmith
    Gsmith Member Posts: 431
    I'm not a boiler designer, but have worked with a few. I believe they (the manufacturer's) have experience tables that they use to let them initially guess how much square feet of tube area or heat exchange area are needed and how much efficiency losses their particular boiler design will have (based on insulation, shape, etc.) then they figure out the heat input required (burner input needed), then they build a prototype, test, change whatever is needed, rebuild, retest until they are happy with the resulting boiler design and the rating is confirmed by actual steam production on an actual unit.
  • DanHolohan
    DanHolohan Member, Moderator, Administrator Posts: 16,487
    I hope that answers his question, Gary. Thanks.
    Retired and loving it.